Year 2015, Volume 13, Issue 1, Pages 24 - 49 2015-04-06

THE MODERN AMERICAN UNIVERSITY AND EARLY ENGLISH DEPARTMENTS: GERMAN MODELS AND AMERICAN PRACTICE, 1870-1920

Yrd. Doç. Dr. Gerard PAULSEN [1]

324 565

The English department first came into existence in the modern American university; its theoretical apparatus, research methodology and pedagogic practices were directly derived from nineteenth-century German philology. Whereas the postCivil War educational reformers who constructed the modern American academic system adapted the German university model to fit it to the social and cultural patterns of America, professors in early English departments simply borrowed German philology and method and, without substantially adding to it or altering it, used it over the next five or six decades as the basis intense research publication. This paper aims to show why American professors of English were so enamored of German philology and, more importantly, what kind of research it enabled them to produce. In addition, it will attempt to examine the consequences of the philological orientation of early English departments and to explain why, when the New Critics finally supplanted philologists and their literary historian descendants, philology almost completely disappeared from English departments
The English department first came into existence in the modern American university; its theoretical apparatus, research methodology and pedagogic practices were directly derived from nineteenth-century German philology. Whereas the post-Civil War educational reformers who constructed the modern American academic system adapted the German university model to fit it to the social and cultural patterns of America, professors in early English departments simply borrowed German philology and method and, without substantially adding to it or altering it, used it over the next five or six decades as the basis intense research publication. This paper aims to show why American professors of English were so enamored of German philology and, more importantly, what kind of research it enabled them to produce. In addition, it will attempt to examine the consequences of the philological orientation of early English departments and to explain why, when the New Critics finally supplanted philologists and their literary historian descendants, philology almost completely disappeared from English departments.
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Primary Language en
Journal Section Articles
Authors

Author: Yrd. Doç. Dr. Gerard PAULSEN

Dates

Publication Date: April 6, 2015

Bibtex
APA PAULSEN, Y . (). . , 13 (1), 24-49. DOI: 10.18026/cbusos.06796
MLA PAULSEN, Y . "". 13 (): 24-49 <http://dergipark.org.tr/cbayarsos/issue/4078/53863>
Chicago PAULSEN, Y . "". 13 (): 24-49
RIS TY - JOUR T1 - AU - Yrd. Doç. Dr. Gerard PAULSEN Y1 - 2015 PY - 2015 N1 - doi: 10.18026/cbusos.06796 DO - 10.18026/cbusos.06796 T2 - Celal Bayar Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi JF - Journal JO - JOR SP - 24 EP - 49 VL - 13 IS - 1 SN - 1304-4796-2146-2844 M3 - doi: 10.18026/cbusos.06796 UR - https://doi.org/10.18026/cbusos.06796 Y2 - 2019 ER -
EndNote %0 Celal Bayar Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi %A Yrd. Doç. Dr. Gerard PAULSEN %T %D 2015 %J Celal Bayar Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi %P 1304-4796-2146-2844 %V 13 %N 1 %R doi: 10.18026/cbusos.06796 %U 10.18026/cbusos.06796
ISNAD PAULSEN, Yrd. Doç. Dr. Gerard . "". Celal Bayar Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi 13 / 1 (April 2015): 24-49. https://doi.org/10.18026/cbusos.06796
AMA PAULSEN Y . . Celal Bayar Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi. 2015; 13(1): 24-49.
Vancouver PAULSEN Y . . Celal Bayar Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi. 2015; 13(1): 49-24.