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Understanding of Current Higher Education System: A focus on the Interpretation of Marxism Over Time

Year 2021, Volume 6, Issue Special Issue (December 2021), 467 - 476, 01.12.2021
https://doi.org/10.24331/ijere.982875

Abstract

This paper discusses the role of Marxism to understand the current higher education system in terms of the theoretical lens. Marxism has been the academic foundation to explain various regimes of communism in some areas of the world, and it still has an impact on the theoretical background to describe specific characteristics of industrial development over time. While prior studies have examined Marxism in terms of specific academic areas, such as economics and business but, there are rare studies that combine the current development of the current higher education system. This study provides the importance of Marxism to the higher education system and how the theoretical approach justifies diverse characteristics of current higher education development. Finally, this research shows the aspects of the revised Marxism framework that could explain the current higher education system and give implications for higher education researchers to reorganize the current educational system.

References

  • Allman, P., McLaren, P., & Rikowski, G. (2005). After the Box People: The labor-capital relation as class constitution–and its consequences for Marxist educational theory and human resistance. Capitalists and Conquerors: A Critical Pedagogy Against Empire. Lanham MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 135-165.
  • Alon, S. (2009). The evolution of class inequality in higher education: Competition, exclusion, and adaptation. American Sociological Review, 74(5), 731-755.
  • Anyon, J. (1994). The retreat of Marxism and socialist feminism: Postmodern and poststructural theories in education. Curriculum Inquiry, 24(2), 115-133.
  • Au, W. (2006). Against economic determinism: Revisiting the roots of neo-Marxism in critical educational theory. Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies, 4(2), 11-35.
  • Balibar, É. (1978). Irrationalism and Marxism. New Left Review, 107, 3-18.
  • Béchard, J. P., & Grégoire, D. (2005). Entrepreneurship education research revisited: The case of higher education. Academy of Management Learning & Education, 4(1), 22-43.
  • Brosio, R. (2004). Marxism, Still the Best Hunter of the Predator, Capitalism.
  • Brown, P. (1995). Cultural capital and social exclusion: some observations on recent trends in education, employment, and the labour market. Work, Employment and Society, 9(1), 29-51.
  • Blackledge, P. (2005). Freedom, Desire and Revolution: Alasdair Macintyre's Early Marxist Ethics. History of Political Thought, 26(4), p.696-720.
  • Cantwell, B., & Maldonado‐Maldonado, A. (2009). Four stories: Confronting contemporary ideas about globalization and internationalization in higher education. Globalisation, Societies and Education, 7(3), 289-306.
  • Cole, M. (2005). Transmodernism, Marxism and social change: Some implications for teacher education. Policy Futures in Education, 3(1), 90-105.
  • Cole, M., Hill, D., & Rikowski, G. (1997). Between postmodernism and nowhere: The predicament of the postmodernist. British journal of educational studies, 45(2), 187-200.
  • Dordoy, A., & Mellor, M. (2000). Ecosocialism and feminism: deep materialism and the contradictions of capitalism. Capitalism Nature Socialism, 11(3), 41-61.
  • Fourie, M. (2003). Beyond the ivory tower: Service learning for sustainable community development: Perspectives on higher education. South African Journal of Higher Education, 17(1), 31-38.
  • Greaves, N., Hill, D., & Maisuria, A. (2007). Embourgeoisment, immiseration, commodification—Marxism revisited: A critique of education in capitalist systems. Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies, 5(1), 38-72.
  • Heyneman, S. P. (2010). A comment on the changes in higher education in the former Soviet Union. European Education, 42(1), 76-87. Hill, D. (2003). Global neo-liberalism, the deformation of education and resistance. Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies, 1(1), 1-30.
  • Hill, D. (2004). Books, banks and bullets: Controlling our minds—The global project of imperialistic and militaristic neo-liberalism and its effect on education policy. Policy Futures in Education, 2(3-4), 504-522.
  • Hill, D. (2005). State theory and the neoliberal reconstruction of schooling and teacher education. Critical theories, radical pedagogies, and global conflicts, 23-51.
  • Hill, H. C., Rowan, B., & Ball, D. L. (2005). Effects of teachers’ mathematical knowledge for teaching on student achievement. American educational research journal, 42(2), 371-406.
  • Hill, D. (2007). Critical teacher education, new labour, and the global project of neoliberal capital. Policy Futures in Education, 5(2), 204-225.
  • Hill, D., & Kumar, R. (2012). Neoliberalism and its impacts. In Global neoliberalism and education and its consequences (pp. 32-49). Routledge.
  • Huckle, J. (2004). Critical realism: A philosophical framework for higher education for sustainability. In Higher education and the challenge of sustainability (pp. 33-47). Springer, Dordrecht.
  • Ibrahim, A. (2007). Linking Marxism, globalization, and citizenship education: Toward a comparative and critical pedagogy post 9/11. Educational Theory, 57(1), 89-103.
  • John Morgan, W. (2005). Marxism and moral education. Journal of Moral Education, 34(4), 391-398.
  • Johnston, R. J. (1989) Environmental Problems: Economy, Society and State. London: Belhaven.
  • Kellner, D. (2006). Marxian perspectives on educational philosophy: From classical Marxism to critical pedagogy. University of Los Angeles, California. Lissovoy, N. D., & McLaren, P. (2003). Educational 'accountability' and the violence of capital: A Marxian reading. Journal of Education Policy, 18(2), 131-143.
  • Malott, C. (2006). Schooling in an era of corporate dominance: Marxism against burning tires. Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies, 4(1).
  • Michael A. Peters (2019). Affective capitalism, higher education and the constitution of the social body Althusser, Deleuze, and Negri on Spinoza and Marxism, Educational Philosophy and Theory, 51(5), 465-473
  • Neary, M. (2010). Student as producer: a pedagogy for the avant-garde?. Learning Exchange, 1(1).
  • Neary, M., & Winn, J. (2016). Beyond public and private: a framework for co-operative higher education.
  • Nixon, E., Scullion, R., & Hearn, R. (2018). Her majesty the student: marketised higher education and the narcissistic (dis) satisfactions of the student-consumer. Studies in Higher Education, 43(6), 927-943.
  • Olssen, M. (2004). Foucault and Marxism: rewriting the theory of historical materialism. Policy Futures in Education, 2(3-4), 454-482.
  • Öhman, M. (2012). Gender, Class and Transhumanism in Charles Stross' Novel Singularity Sky: An Intersectional Analysis of Post-Singularity Societies.
  • Papagiannis, G. J., Klees, S. J., & Bickel, R. N. (1982). Toward a political economy of educational innovation. Review of Educational Research, 52(2), 245-290.
  • Perry, L. B., & Tor, G. H. (2008). Understanding educational transfer: Theoretical perspectives and conceptual frameworks. Prospects, 38(4), 509-526.
  • Qi, J. (1997). Postmodernism and Marxism: What Is Called into Question in the Educational Discourse?.
  • Rikowski, G. (2002). Prelude: Marxist educational theory after postmodernism. Marxism against postmodernism in educational theory, 15-32.
  • Soper, K. (1999). The politics of nature: Reflections on hedonism, progress and ecology. Capitalism Nature Socialism, 10(2), 47-70.
  • Steele, T., & Taylor, R. (2004). Marxism and adult education in Britain. Policy Futures in Education, 2(3-4), 578-592.
  • Torres, C. A. (1995). Chapter 6: State and Education Revisited: Why Educational Researchers Should Think Politically About Education. Review of research in education, 21(1), 255-331.
  • Trowler, P. (2001). Captured by the discourse? The socially constitutive power of new higher education discourse in the UK. Organization, 8(2), 183-201.
  • Whitehead, J. (2009). How do I influence the generation of living educational theories for personal and social accountability in improving practice? Using a living theory methodology in improving educational practice. In Research Methods for the self-study of practice (pp. 173-194). Springer, Dordrecht.
  • Young, M. (2012). Education, globalisation and the 'voice of knowledge.' In Educating for the Knowledge Economy? (pp. 151-163). Routledge.

Year 2021, Volume 6, Issue Special Issue (December 2021), 467 - 476, 01.12.2021
https://doi.org/10.24331/ijere.982875

Abstract

References

  • Allman, P., McLaren, P., & Rikowski, G. (2005). After the Box People: The labor-capital relation as class constitution–and its consequences for Marxist educational theory and human resistance. Capitalists and Conquerors: A Critical Pedagogy Against Empire. Lanham MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 135-165.
  • Alon, S. (2009). The evolution of class inequality in higher education: Competition, exclusion, and adaptation. American Sociological Review, 74(5), 731-755.
  • Anyon, J. (1994). The retreat of Marxism and socialist feminism: Postmodern and poststructural theories in education. Curriculum Inquiry, 24(2), 115-133.
  • Au, W. (2006). Against economic determinism: Revisiting the roots of neo-Marxism in critical educational theory. Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies, 4(2), 11-35.
  • Balibar, É. (1978). Irrationalism and Marxism. New Left Review, 107, 3-18.
  • Béchard, J. P., & Grégoire, D. (2005). Entrepreneurship education research revisited: The case of higher education. Academy of Management Learning & Education, 4(1), 22-43.
  • Brosio, R. (2004). Marxism, Still the Best Hunter of the Predator, Capitalism.
  • Brown, P. (1995). Cultural capital and social exclusion: some observations on recent trends in education, employment, and the labour market. Work, Employment and Society, 9(1), 29-51.
  • Blackledge, P. (2005). Freedom, Desire and Revolution: Alasdair Macintyre's Early Marxist Ethics. History of Political Thought, 26(4), p.696-720.
  • Cantwell, B., & Maldonado‐Maldonado, A. (2009). Four stories: Confronting contemporary ideas about globalization and internationalization in higher education. Globalisation, Societies and Education, 7(3), 289-306.
  • Cole, M. (2005). Transmodernism, Marxism and social change: Some implications for teacher education. Policy Futures in Education, 3(1), 90-105.
  • Cole, M., Hill, D., & Rikowski, G. (1997). Between postmodernism and nowhere: The predicament of the postmodernist. British journal of educational studies, 45(2), 187-200.
  • Dordoy, A., & Mellor, M. (2000). Ecosocialism and feminism: deep materialism and the contradictions of capitalism. Capitalism Nature Socialism, 11(3), 41-61.
  • Fourie, M. (2003). Beyond the ivory tower: Service learning for sustainable community development: Perspectives on higher education. South African Journal of Higher Education, 17(1), 31-38.
  • Greaves, N., Hill, D., & Maisuria, A. (2007). Embourgeoisment, immiseration, commodification—Marxism revisited: A critique of education in capitalist systems. Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies, 5(1), 38-72.
  • Heyneman, S. P. (2010). A comment on the changes in higher education in the former Soviet Union. European Education, 42(1), 76-87. Hill, D. (2003). Global neo-liberalism, the deformation of education and resistance. Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies, 1(1), 1-30.
  • Hill, D. (2004). Books, banks and bullets: Controlling our minds—The global project of imperialistic and militaristic neo-liberalism and its effect on education policy. Policy Futures in Education, 2(3-4), 504-522.
  • Hill, D. (2005). State theory and the neoliberal reconstruction of schooling and teacher education. Critical theories, radical pedagogies, and global conflicts, 23-51.
  • Hill, H. C., Rowan, B., & Ball, D. L. (2005). Effects of teachers’ mathematical knowledge for teaching on student achievement. American educational research journal, 42(2), 371-406.
  • Hill, D. (2007). Critical teacher education, new labour, and the global project of neoliberal capital. Policy Futures in Education, 5(2), 204-225.
  • Hill, D., & Kumar, R. (2012). Neoliberalism and its impacts. In Global neoliberalism and education and its consequences (pp. 32-49). Routledge.
  • Huckle, J. (2004). Critical realism: A philosophical framework for higher education for sustainability. In Higher education and the challenge of sustainability (pp. 33-47). Springer, Dordrecht.
  • Ibrahim, A. (2007). Linking Marxism, globalization, and citizenship education: Toward a comparative and critical pedagogy post 9/11. Educational Theory, 57(1), 89-103.
  • John Morgan, W. (2005). Marxism and moral education. Journal of Moral Education, 34(4), 391-398.
  • Johnston, R. J. (1989) Environmental Problems: Economy, Society and State. London: Belhaven.
  • Kellner, D. (2006). Marxian perspectives on educational philosophy: From classical Marxism to critical pedagogy. University of Los Angeles, California. Lissovoy, N. D., & McLaren, P. (2003). Educational 'accountability' and the violence of capital: A Marxian reading. Journal of Education Policy, 18(2), 131-143.
  • Malott, C. (2006). Schooling in an era of corporate dominance: Marxism against burning tires. Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies, 4(1).
  • Michael A. Peters (2019). Affective capitalism, higher education and the constitution of the social body Althusser, Deleuze, and Negri on Spinoza and Marxism, Educational Philosophy and Theory, 51(5), 465-473
  • Neary, M. (2010). Student as producer: a pedagogy for the avant-garde?. Learning Exchange, 1(1).
  • Neary, M., & Winn, J. (2016). Beyond public and private: a framework for co-operative higher education.
  • Nixon, E., Scullion, R., & Hearn, R. (2018). Her majesty the student: marketised higher education and the narcissistic (dis) satisfactions of the student-consumer. Studies in Higher Education, 43(6), 927-943.
  • Olssen, M. (2004). Foucault and Marxism: rewriting the theory of historical materialism. Policy Futures in Education, 2(3-4), 454-482.
  • Öhman, M. (2012). Gender, Class and Transhumanism in Charles Stross' Novel Singularity Sky: An Intersectional Analysis of Post-Singularity Societies.
  • Papagiannis, G. J., Klees, S. J., & Bickel, R. N. (1982). Toward a political economy of educational innovation. Review of Educational Research, 52(2), 245-290.
  • Perry, L. B., & Tor, G. H. (2008). Understanding educational transfer: Theoretical perspectives and conceptual frameworks. Prospects, 38(4), 509-526.
  • Qi, J. (1997). Postmodernism and Marxism: What Is Called into Question in the Educational Discourse?.
  • Rikowski, G. (2002). Prelude: Marxist educational theory after postmodernism. Marxism against postmodernism in educational theory, 15-32.
  • Soper, K. (1999). The politics of nature: Reflections on hedonism, progress and ecology. Capitalism Nature Socialism, 10(2), 47-70.
  • Steele, T., & Taylor, R. (2004). Marxism and adult education in Britain. Policy Futures in Education, 2(3-4), 578-592.
  • Torres, C. A. (1995). Chapter 6: State and Education Revisited: Why Educational Researchers Should Think Politically About Education. Review of research in education, 21(1), 255-331.
  • Trowler, P. (2001). Captured by the discourse? The socially constitutive power of new higher education discourse in the UK. Organization, 8(2), 183-201.
  • Whitehead, J. (2009). How do I influence the generation of living educational theories for personal and social accountability in improving practice? Using a living theory methodology in improving educational practice. In Research Methods for the self-study of practice (pp. 173-194). Springer, Dordrecht.
  • Young, M. (2012). Education, globalisation and the 'voice of knowledge.' In Educating for the Knowledge Economy? (pp. 151-163). Routledge.

Details

Primary Language English
Subjects Education, Scientific Disciplines
Journal Section Articles
Authors

Youngsik HWANG> (Primary Author)
Chungnam National University
0000-0003-4065-225X
South Korea

Publication Date December 1, 2021
Published in Issue Year 2021, Volume 6, Issue Special Issue (December 2021)

Cite

Bibtex @research article { ijere982875, journal = {International Journal of Educational Research Review}, eissn = {2458-9322}, address = {Sakarya Üniversitesi Eğitim Fakültesi E blok Hendek-Sakarya}, publisher = {Sakarya University}, year = {2021}, volume = {6}, number = {Special Issue (December 2021)}, pages = {467 - 476}, doi = {10.24331/ijere.982875}, title = {Understanding of Current Higher Education System: A focus on the Interpretation of Marxism Over Time}, key = {cite}, author = {Hwang, Youngsik} }
APA Hwang, Y. (2021). Understanding of Current Higher Education System: A focus on the Interpretation of Marxism Over Time . International Journal of Educational Research Review , Special Issue (December 2021) , 467-476 . DOI: 10.24331/ijere.982875
MLA Hwang, Y. "Understanding of Current Higher Education System: A focus on the Interpretation of Marxism Over Time" . International Journal of Educational Research Review 6 (2021 ): 467-476 <https://dergipark.org.tr/en/pub/ijere/issue/65536/982875>
Chicago Hwang, Y. "Understanding of Current Higher Education System: A focus on the Interpretation of Marxism Over Time". International Journal of Educational Research Review 6 (2021 ): 467-476
RIS TY - JOUR T1 - Understanding of Current Higher Education System: A focus on the Interpretation of Marxism Over Time AU - YoungsikHwang Y1 - 2021 PY - 2021 N1 - doi: 10.24331/ijere.982875 DO - 10.24331/ijere.982875 T2 - International Journal of Educational Research Review JF - Journal JO - JOR SP - 467 EP - 476 VL - 6 IS - Special Issue (December 2021) SN - -2458-9322 M3 - doi: 10.24331/ijere.982875 UR - https://doi.org/10.24331/ijere.982875 Y2 - 2021 ER -
EndNote %0 International Journal of Educational Research Review Understanding of Current Higher Education System: A focus on the Interpretation of Marxism Over Time %A Youngsik Hwang %T Understanding of Current Higher Education System: A focus on the Interpretation of Marxism Over Time %D 2021 %J International Journal of Educational Research Review %P -2458-9322 %V 6 %N Special Issue (December 2021) %R doi: 10.24331/ijere.982875 %U 10.24331/ijere.982875
ISNAD Hwang, Youngsik . "Understanding of Current Higher Education System: A focus on the Interpretation of Marxism Over Time". International Journal of Educational Research Review 6 / Special Issue (December 2021) (December 2021): 467-476 . https://doi.org/10.24331/ijere.982875
AMA Hwang Y. Understanding of Current Higher Education System: A focus on the Interpretation of Marxism Over Time. IJERE. 2021; 6(Special Issue (December 2021)): 467-476.
Vancouver Hwang Y. Understanding of Current Higher Education System: A focus on the Interpretation of Marxism Over Time. International Journal of Educational Research Review. 2021; 6(Special Issue (December 2021)): 467-476.
IEEE Y. Hwang , "Understanding of Current Higher Education System: A focus on the Interpretation of Marxism Over Time", International Journal of Educational Research Review, vol. 6, no. Special Issue (December 2021), pp. 467-476, Dec. 2021, doi:10.24331/ijere.982875

The International Journal of Educational Research Review (IJERE) aims to be a scientific reference source where researchers can publish their studies and have access to relevant studies. IJERE is an international journal for researchers interested in the review of studies and theoretical papers on education at any level.
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