Year 2020, Volume 6 , Issue 1, Pages 30 - 37 2020-06-25

CYBER AGGRESSION: Impact, Awareness & Protection
CYBER AGGRESSION: Impact, Awareness & Protection

Adeel Nazir AHMAD [1] , Nazir AHMAD [2]


In all categories of schools, whether state, private or grammar, minor incidents of fun and merriment do happen among same-age children. The naughty kids participate in funny jokes by mocking one another for the sake of amusement. Even conventional peer-to-peer pushing and propelling do not create hostility, but elbowing and jostling generate anger, whereas hitting and knocking down a classmate can lead to bitterness and hatred. These actions and reactions are various forms of physical bullying giving rise to aggressive behaviour. 

The free access to mobile devices has made teenager smarter for they now use disappearing snapchat messages and Finsta (fake Instagram) accounts without parents' knowledge. They move on to different apps and talk freely for the sake of freedom, independence and excitement. The supervisory and retraining power of a good mother has been penalised due to tremendous technological advancement in all spheres of mobile and cyber platforms. Exercising freedom without responsibility in the name of liberty and individual emancipation can be very risky for an orderly civilisation in which strong and weak, rich and poor live in peace and harmony. 

In all categories of schools, whether state, private or grammar, minor incidents of fun and merriment do happen among same-age children. The naughty kids participate in funny jokes by mocking one another for the sake of amusement. Even conventional peer-to-peer pushing and propelling do not create hostility, but elbowing and jostling generate anger, whereas hitting and knocking down a classmate can lead to bitterness and hatred. These actions and reactions are various forms of physical bullying giving rise to aggressive behaviour. 

The free access to mobile devices has made teenager smarter for they now use disappearing snapchat messages and Finsta (fake Instagram) accounts without parents' knowledge. They move on to different apps and talk freely for the sake of freedom, independence and excitement. The supervisory and retraining power of a good mother has been penalised due to tremendous technological advancement in all spheres of mobile and cyber platforms. Exercising freedom without responsibility in the name of liberty and individual emancipation can be very risky for an orderly civilisation in which strong and weak, rich and poor live in peace and harmony. 

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Primary Language en
Subjects Social Sciences, Interdisciplinary
Journal Section Review
Authors

Orcid: 0000-0002-1146-4324
Author: Adeel Nazir AHMAD
Country: United Kingdom


Orcid: 0000-0002-9677-7329
Author: Nazir AHMAD (Primary Author)
Country: United Kingdom


Dates

Application Date : October 13, 2019
Acceptance Date : May 27, 2020
Publication Date : June 25, 2020

APA Ahmad, A , Ahmad, N . (2020). CYBER AGGRESSION: Impact, Awareness & Protection . Uluslararası Kültürel ve Sosyal Araştırmalar Dergisi (UKSAD) , 6 (1) , 30-37 . Retrieved from https://dergipark.org.tr/en/pub/intjcss/issue/55225/632614