Year 2019, Volume 20, Issue 1, Pages 53 - 70 2019-01-01

Asynchronous Video and the Development of Instructor Social Presence and Student Engagement

Kayla COLLINS [1] , Shannon GROFF [2] , Cindy MATHENA [3] , Lori KUPCZYNSKI [4]

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Enrollment in online learning continues to grow in the higher education sector, along with persistent goals dedicated to achieving better student outcomes and lowering attrition rates. Improved student engagement has been shown to possibly reduce attrition rates through a greater sense of connectedness and decreased feelings of isolation among online learners. Instructor social presence may be the most important factor in building the relationships that foster learning and retention. Through communication, the instructor conveys the necessary immediacy behaviors required to cultivate these interpersonal relationships. With improved technology that allows for enhanced communication in online classrooms, the use of asynchronous video may be an effective way to improve instructor social presence and student engagement. This quasi-experimental design aimed to determine whether asynchronous video or text-based communication increased students’ perceptions of instructor social presence and student engagement in an online graduate classroom. Significance was found for student engagement based on the number of discussion posts and length of discussion posts. Students in the group who received text-based communication demonstrated increased student engagement in voluntary discussion boards as opposed to students in the group who received asynchronous video. There was no significant difference found for instructor social presence between the two groups.

Video, engagement, instructor social presence, online learning
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Primary Language en
Subjects Social
Journal Section Articles
Authors

Orcid: 0000-0001-7136-6418
Author: Kayla COLLINS (Primary Author)

Orcid: 0000-0002-6869-7209
Author: Shannon GROFF

Orcid: 0000-0001-9697-6339
Author: Cindy MATHENA

Orcid: 0000-0002-3645-5328
Author: Lori KUPCZYNSKI

Bibtex @research article { tojde522378, journal = {Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education}, issn = {1302-6488}, address = {Anadolu University}, year = {2019}, volume = {20}, pages = {53 - 70}, doi = {10.17718/tojde.522378}, title = {Asynchronous Video and the Development of Instructor Social Presence and Student Engagement}, key = {cite}, author = {COLLINS, Kayla and GROFF, Shannon and MATHENA, Cindy and KUPCZYNSKI, Lori} }
APA COLLINS, K , GROFF, S , MATHENA, C , KUPCZYNSKI, L . (2019). Asynchronous Video and the Development of Instructor Social Presence and Student Engagement. Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education, 20 (1), 53-70. DOI: 10.17718/tojde.522378
MLA COLLINS, K , GROFF, S , MATHENA, C , KUPCZYNSKI, L . "Asynchronous Video and the Development of Instructor Social Presence and Student Engagement". Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education 20 (2019): 53-70 <http://dergipark.org.tr/tojde/issue/43090/522378>
Chicago COLLINS, K , GROFF, S , MATHENA, C , KUPCZYNSKI, L . "Asynchronous Video and the Development of Instructor Social Presence and Student Engagement". Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education 20 (2019): 53-70
RIS TY - JOUR T1 - Asynchronous Video and the Development of Instructor Social Presence and Student Engagement AU - Kayla COLLINS , Shannon GROFF , Cindy MATHENA , Lori KUPCZYNSKI Y1 - 2019 PY - 2019 N1 - doi: 10.17718/tojde.522378 DO - 10.17718/tojde.522378 T2 - Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education JF - Journal JO - JOR SP - 53 EP - 70 VL - 20 IS - 1 SN - 1302-6488- M3 - doi: 10.17718/tojde.522378 UR - https://doi.org/10.17718/tojde.522378 Y2 - 2018 ER -
EndNote %0 Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education Asynchronous Video and the Development of Instructor Social Presence and Student Engagement %A Kayla COLLINS , Shannon GROFF , Cindy MATHENA , Lori KUPCZYNSKI %T Asynchronous Video and the Development of Instructor Social Presence and Student Engagement %D 2019 %J Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education %P 1302-6488- %V 20 %N 1 %R doi: 10.17718/tojde.522378 %U 10.17718/tojde.522378
ISNAD COLLINS, Kayla , GROFF, Shannon , MATHENA, Cindy , KUPCZYNSKI, Lori . "Asynchronous Video and the Development of Instructor Social Presence and Student Engagement". Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education 20 / 1 (January 2019): 53-70. https://doi.org/10.17718/tojde.522378