2019-12-31

The Silence of non-Western International Relations Theory as a Camouflage Strategy: The Trauma of Qing China and the Late Ottoman Empire

Hayriye Asena Demirer


My main argument in this article is that there have been at least three important barriers to the development of non-Western international relations theory (NWIRT): intellectual barriers (traumatizing effects of the imposition of the “standard of civilization”); ideational barriers (dominance of Western concepts and contexts); and scientific barriers (imposition of the standard of science). I argue that the silence of NWIRT is substantially a side effect of the strategy of mimicking the West, which was developed as an intellectual defense mechanism or as a camouflage strategy for the (re)establishment and the survival of non-Western states after their traumatic encounter with the Western states. Therefore, the surfacing of NWIRT discussions in the last decades can be attributed primarily to the maturation of an internal condition that is the revival of self-confidence in the residuals of former empires due to their regaining of rising power status and, thus, can be seen as a new phase of the ‘revolt against the West.’ On the other hand, I argue that the rise of NWIRT discussions are also related to the ripening of an external condition: some European schools of IR have been attempting to intellectually balance against the hegemony of American mainstream IRT, therefore, publication of edited books and special issues on NWIRT can also be read as searching for intellectual alliance with NWIRT.
Non-western IR theory, standard of civilization, mimicking as a response to trauma, late Ottoman Empire, Qing China
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Orcid: 0000-0002-6679-1015
Yazar: Hayriye Asena Demirer
Kurum: İSTANBUL GELİŞİM ÜNİVERSİTESİ
Ülke: Turkey


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Yayımlanma Tarihi : 31 Aralık 2019

Bibtex @araştırma makalesi { allazimuth663742, journal = {All Azimuth: A Journal of Foreign Policy and Peace}, issn = {2146-7757}, address = {}, publisher = {Center for Foreign Policy and Peace Research, İhsan Doğramacı Peace Foundation}, year = {2019}, pages = { - }, doi = {10.20991/allazimuth.663742}, title = {The Silence of non-Western International Relations Theory as a Camouflage Strategy: The Trauma of Qing China and the Late Ottoman Empire}, key = {cite}, author = {Demirer, Hayriye Asena} }
APA Demirer, H . (2019). The Silence of non-Western International Relations Theory as a Camouflage Strategy: The Trauma of Qing China and the Late Ottoman Empire. All Azimuth: A Journal of Foreign Policy and Peace , , . DOI: 10.20991/allazimuth.663742
MLA Demirer, H . "The Silence of non-Western International Relations Theory as a Camouflage Strategy: The Trauma of Qing China and the Late Ottoman Empire". All Azimuth: A Journal of Foreign Policy and Peace (2019 ): <https://dergipark.org.tr/tr/pub/allazimuth/article/663742>
Chicago Demirer, H . "The Silence of non-Western International Relations Theory as a Camouflage Strategy: The Trauma of Qing China and the Late Ottoman Empire". All Azimuth: A Journal of Foreign Policy and Peace (2019 ):
RIS TY - JOUR T1 - The Silence of non-Western International Relations Theory as a Camouflage Strategy: The Trauma of Qing China and the Late Ottoman Empire AU - Hayriye Asena Demirer Y1 - 2019 PY - 2019 N1 - doi: 10.20991/allazimuth.663742 DO - 10.20991/allazimuth.663742 T2 - All Azimuth: A Journal of Foreign Policy and Peace JF - Journal JO - JOR SP - EP - SN - 2146-7757- M3 - doi: 10.20991/allazimuth.663742 UR - https://doi.org/10.20991/allazimuth.663742 Y2 - 2019 ER -
EndNote %0 All Azimuth: A Journal of Foreign Policy and Peace The Silence of non-Western International Relations Theory as a Camouflage Strategy: The Trauma of Qing China and the Late Ottoman Empire %A Hayriye Asena Demirer %T The Silence of non-Western International Relations Theory as a Camouflage Strategy: The Trauma of Qing China and the Late Ottoman Empire %D 2019 %J All Azimuth: A Journal of Foreign Policy and Peace %P 2146-7757- %R doi: 10.20991/allazimuth.663742 %U 10.20991/allazimuth.663742
ISNAD Demirer, Hayriye Asena . "The Silence of non-Western International Relations Theory as a Camouflage Strategy: The Trauma of Qing China and the Late Ottoman Empire". All Azimuth: A Journal of Foreign Policy and Peace (Aralık 2020): - . https://doi.org/10.20991/allazimuth.663742
AMA Demirer H . The Silence of non-Western International Relations Theory as a Camouflage Strategy: The Trauma of Qing China and the Late Ottoman Empire. All Azimuth: A Journal of Foreign Policy and Peace. 2019; -.
Vancouver Demirer H . The Silence of non-Western International Relations Theory as a Camouflage Strategy: The Trauma of Qing China and the Late Ottoman Empire. All Azimuth: A Journal of Foreign Policy and Peace. 2019; -.