Author Guidelines

  • ULUM Journal of Religious Inquiries is an academic refereed journal dedicated to publishing articles, essays, translations, symposium reviews, and book reviews primarily within the fields of Religious and Islamic Studies including Arts and Humanities, Religion, Islamic Studies as well as Social and Behavioral Sciences, Theology and Ethics.


  • ULUM accepts paper submission from researchers with only doctoral degrees in research articles and book review.

  • Papers may not exceed 10.000 words, including appended material such as pictures, charts and maps etc.

  • Authors transfer (assign) the copyright in their articles to ULUM before publication. The authors should prepare a copyright transfer form signed by all authors. Unless otherwise specified, written communication will be carried on with the first author, at all. The intention of having the disposed paper to be published in our Journal as well as the preferred section (research, review, case reports or letter to the editor) should clearly be indicated in the paper. COPYRIGHT RELEASE FORM

  • ULUM does not charge any article submission, processing charges, and printing charge from the authors. 

  • ULUM requires writers to use the ISNAD Citation Style. There is no article submission or processing charges in this journal. 

THE ISNAD CITATION STYLE

 http://www.isnadsistemi.org




                     BOOK

a) One Author: 

1. Michael Pollan, The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals (New York: Penguin, 2006), 99–100.

2. Pollan, Omnivore’s Dilemma, 3.

Bibliography: 

Pollan, Michael. The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals. New York: Penguin, 2006.

 

b) Two Authors

1. Geoffrey C. Ward and Ken Burns, The War: An Intimate History 1941–1945 (New York: Knopf, 2007), 52.

2. Ward and Burns, War, 59–61.

 

Bibliography: 

Ward, Geoffrey C., and Ken Burns. The War: An Intimate History 1941–1945. New York: Knopf, 2007.


c) Three or More Authors

For three or more authors, list all of the authors in the bibliography; in the note, list only the first author, followed by et al. (“and others”):

1. Mitchell L. Eisen, Jodi A. Quas, and Gail S. Goodman, eds., Memory and Suggestibility in the Forensic Interview (Mahwah, NJ: L. Erlbaum Assoicates, 2002), 65.

2. Eisen and et al., Memory and Suggestibility in the Forensic Interview, 67.


Bibliography: 

Eisen, Mitchell L., Jodi A. Quas, and Gail S. Goodman, eds. Memory and Suggestibility in the Forensic Interview. Mahwah, NJ: L. Erlbaum Associates, 2002.

 

d) Translation

1. Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Love in the Time of Cholera, trans. Edith Grossman (London: Cape, 1988), 242–55.

2. Marquez, Cholera, 33.


Bibliography:

Marquez, Gabriel Garcia. Love in the Time of Cholera. Translated by Edith Grossman. London: Cape, 1988.

 

e) Chapter or Other Part of a Book

1. John D. Kelly, “Seeing Red: Mao Fetishism, Pax Americana, and the Moral Economy of War,” in Anthropology and Global Counterinsurgency, ed. John D. Kelly et al (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010), 77.

2. Kelly, “Seeing Red,” 81–82.


Bibliography: 

Kelly, John D. “Seeing Red: Mao Fetishism, Pax Americana, and the Moral Economy of War.” In Anthropology and Global Counterinsurgency, edited by John D. Kelly, Beatrice Jauregui, Sean T. Mitchell, and Jeremy Walton, 67–83. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010.

 

ARTICLE

a)Printed

1. Joshua I. Weinstein, “The Market in Plato’s Republic,” Classical Philology 104 (2009): 440.

2. Weinstein, “Plato’s Republic,” 452–53.


Bibliography: 

Weinstein, Joshua I. “The Market in Plato’s Republic.” Classical Philology 104 (2009): 439–58.

 

b) Online

1. Gueorgi Kossinets and Duncan J. Watts, “Origins of Homophily in an Evolving Social Network”, American Journal of Sociology 115 (2009): 411, accessed February 28, 2010, doi:10.1086/599247.

2. Kossinets and Watts, “Origins of Homophily,” 439.

 

Bibliography: 

Kossinets, Gueorgi, and Duncan J. Watts. “Origins of Homophily in an Evolving Social Network.” American Journal of Sociology 115 (2009): 405–50. Accessed February 28, 2010. doi:10.1086/599247.

 

ENCYCLOPEDIA ENTRIES

For encylopedia entries, the author’s name and surname are written first. These are followed by the title of the entry in quotation marks, the full name of the encyclopedia, , the place and date of publication, its volume number and page numbers:

1. As’ad Abukhalil, “Maronites,” in Encyclopedia of the Modern Middle East and North Africa, ed. Philip Mattar, 2nd ed., vol. 3 (New York: Macmillan Reference, 2004), 1491-92. 

2. Abukhalil, “Maronites,” 1492. 


Bibliography: 

Abukhalil, As’ad. “Maronites.” In Encycloedia or the Modern Middle East and North Africa. Edited by Philip Mattar. 2nd ed. Vol. 3. New York: Macmillan Reference, 1491-92.

 

DISSERTATION

For theses and dissertations, the following order should be followed: name of the author and surname, full title of thesis in italics, thesis type, the name of the university and date.

1. Mihwa Choi, “Contesting Imaginaires in Death Rituals during the Northern Song Dynasty” (PhD diss., University of Chicago, 2008), 55.

2. Choi, “Contesting Imaginaires,” 59.

 

Bibliography: 

Choi, Mihwa. “Contesting Imaginaires in Death Rituals during the Northern Song Dynasty.” PhD diss., University of Chicago, 2008.

 

The Isnad Citation Style: http://www.isnadsistemi.org



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