Year 2015, Volume 5 , Issue 1, Pages 163 - 176 2015-07-13

This chapter discusses how religious belief emerges as a byproduct of ‘highly structured’ systems, or preexisting adaptations in the social world. It starts by presenting evidence that argues that the universals of religion exist because of the general habits of the human mind: The thought of having ‘agents and designers’ of everything, and having a common sense on dualism that bodies and souls are distinct. It further explains the implications of these habits of thinking

This chapter discusses how religious belief emerges as a byproduct of ‘highly structured’ systems, or preexisting adaptations in the social world. It starts by presenting evidence that argues that the universals of religion exist because of the general habits of the human mind: The thought of having ‘agents and designers’ of everything, and having a common sense on dualism that bodies and souls are distinct. It further explains the implications of these habits of thinking.

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  • Öz: Bu yazı dini inancın ‘yüksek yapılı’ sistemlerin bir yan ürünü ya
  • da önceden varolan uyarlamalar olarak toplumsal dünyada nasıl or
  • taya çıktıklarını tartışmaktadır. Yazı, insan zihninin genel alışkan
  • lıkları yüzünden dinin evrensellerinin varolduğunu iddia eden kanı
  • tın sunulmasıyla başlar: Her şeyin ‘etkenleri ve tasarımcıları” oldu
  • ğu düşüncesi ile bedenler ve ruhların ayrı olduğu şeklindeki düa
  • lizm konusunda bir ortak duyuya sahip olma düşüncesi. Yazı ayrıca
  • bu düşünme alışkanlıklarının birbirine karştırılmalarını da açıkla- maktadır.
  • Anahtar Kelimeler: Evrim, din, düalizm, sosyal yapılar, evrimsel rastlantı.
Primary Language tr
Journal Section Translations
Authors

Author: Paul Bloom

Author: Osman Zahid Çifçi

Dates

Publication Date : July 13, 2015

APA Bloom, P , Çifçi, O . (2015). Religious Belief as an Evolutionary Accident. Beytulhikme An International Journal of Philosophy , 5 (1) , 163-176 . DOI: 10.18491/bijop.82438