Case Report
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Year 2017, Volume 3, Issue 2, 114 - 129, 10.12.2017

Abstract

References

  • Badger, R., & White, G. (2000). A process genre approach to teaching writing. ELT Journal, 54(2), 153-160.
  • Berkenkotter, C. & Huckin, T. (1995). Genre knowledge in disciplinary communication: Cognition/culture/power. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Consolo, D. A. (2006). Classroom oral interaction in foreign language lessons and implications for teacher development. Linguagem & Ensino, 9 (2), 33-55.
  • Cheng, A. (2006). Understanding learners and learning in ESP genre-based writing instruction. English for Specific Purposes, 25, 76-89.
  • Derewianka, B. (2003). Trends and issues in genre-based approaches. RELC, 34(2), 133-154.
  • Grabe, W., & Kaplan, R. B. (1996). Theory and practice of writing: An applied linguistic perspective. New York: Longman.
  • Hyland, K. (2002). Genre: language, context and literacy. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 22, 113-35.
  • Hyland,K. (2003). Genre-based pedagogies: A social response to process. Journal of Second Language Writing, 12, 17-29.
  • Johns, A. M. (1997). Text, role and context: Developing academic literacies. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Johns, A. M. (2002). Genre in the classroom. New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Kress, G. (2003). Literacy in the new media age. London: Routledge.
  • Kroll, B. (1990). Second language writing: Research insights for the classroom. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.
  • Lin, B. (2006). Vygotskian principles in genre-based approach to teaching writing. NUCL JLCC, 8(3), 69-83.
  • Matsuo, C. and Bevan, G. (2002). Two approaches to genre-based writing instruction: A comparative study. Presented paper at the Japan Association for Language Teaching National conference. Retrieved on May 12, 2009, from http://www.adm.fukuoka-u.ac.jp/fu844/home2/Ronso/Jinbun/L38-1/L3801_0155.pdf
  • Myles, J. (2002). Second language writing and research: The writing process and error analysis in student texts. Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language, 6(2), 1-19. O’Brien, T. (2004). Writing in a foreign language: Teaching and learning. Language Teaching, 37, 1-28.
  • Raimes, A. (1991). Out of the woods: Emerging traditions in the teaching of writing. TESOL Quarterly, 25 (3), 407-430.
  • Silva, T. (1990). Second language composition instruction: Developments, issues, and directions in ESL. In B. Kroll (Ed.) Second Language Writing: Research Insights for the Classroom (pp.11-36). New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Tangpermpoon, T. (2008). Integrated approaches to improve students writing skills for English major students. ABAC Journal, 28( 2), 1-9.
  • Ur, P. (1996). A course in language teaching: Practice & theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wu, B. (1998). Towards an understanding of the dynamic process of L2 classroom interaction. System, 26, 525-540.

A Case Study on Teacher Practice of Genre-Based Writing and Classroom Interaction Patterns at an Advanced Level

Year 2017, Volume 3, Issue 2, 114 - 129, 10.12.2017

Abstract

This paper is a classroom-based research study, which explores the practice of the English teacher genre-based writing in the English Foreign Language (ELF) setting as regards the classroom interaction patterns. The study took place in a private tertiary institution in Istanbul, Turkey. To ensure the essence of the qualitative research design, the interpretive participant fieldwork, classroom observation data, structured and semi-structured interviews, course pack, syllabus, and handout analysis were integrated also in the research process. The data collection and analyses occurred simultaneously. The categories along with the subcategories such as teacher pedagogy of the genre-based writing approach, learning outcomes and interaction patterns were created and verified; concurrently with the accumulated data. To ensure the external reliability of the outcome, triangulation and member checking was employed and the results indicate that genre-based writing classes observed in this study have focused on the model texts and the production of similar texts disregarding two other major phases - contextual explanation and joint construction of the text, which are vital for delivering the social purpose of writing skills. 

References

  • Badger, R., & White, G. (2000). A process genre approach to teaching writing. ELT Journal, 54(2), 153-160.
  • Berkenkotter, C. & Huckin, T. (1995). Genre knowledge in disciplinary communication: Cognition/culture/power. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Consolo, D. A. (2006). Classroom oral interaction in foreign language lessons and implications for teacher development. Linguagem & Ensino, 9 (2), 33-55.
  • Cheng, A. (2006). Understanding learners and learning in ESP genre-based writing instruction. English for Specific Purposes, 25, 76-89.
  • Derewianka, B. (2003). Trends and issues in genre-based approaches. RELC, 34(2), 133-154.
  • Grabe, W., & Kaplan, R. B. (1996). Theory and practice of writing: An applied linguistic perspective. New York: Longman.
  • Hyland, K. (2002). Genre: language, context and literacy. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 22, 113-35.
  • Hyland,K. (2003). Genre-based pedagogies: A social response to process. Journal of Second Language Writing, 12, 17-29.
  • Johns, A. M. (1997). Text, role and context: Developing academic literacies. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Johns, A. M. (2002). Genre in the classroom. New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Kress, G. (2003). Literacy in the new media age. London: Routledge.
  • Kroll, B. (1990). Second language writing: Research insights for the classroom. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.
  • Lin, B. (2006). Vygotskian principles in genre-based approach to teaching writing. NUCL JLCC, 8(3), 69-83.
  • Matsuo, C. and Bevan, G. (2002). Two approaches to genre-based writing instruction: A comparative study. Presented paper at the Japan Association for Language Teaching National conference. Retrieved on May 12, 2009, from http://www.adm.fukuoka-u.ac.jp/fu844/home2/Ronso/Jinbun/L38-1/L3801_0155.pdf
  • Myles, J. (2002). Second language writing and research: The writing process and error analysis in student texts. Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language, 6(2), 1-19. O’Brien, T. (2004). Writing in a foreign language: Teaching and learning. Language Teaching, 37, 1-28.
  • Raimes, A. (1991). Out of the woods: Emerging traditions in the teaching of writing. TESOL Quarterly, 25 (3), 407-430.
  • Silva, T. (1990). Second language composition instruction: Developments, issues, and directions in ESL. In B. Kroll (Ed.) Second Language Writing: Research Insights for the Classroom (pp.11-36). New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Tangpermpoon, T. (2008). Integrated approaches to improve students writing skills for English major students. ABAC Journal, 28( 2), 1-9.
  • Ur, P. (1996). A course in language teaching: Practice & theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wu, B. (1998). Towards an understanding of the dynamic process of L2 classroom interaction. System, 26, 525-540.

Details

Subjects Social
Journal Section Research articles
Authors

Fidel ÇAKMAK>
Alanya Alaadin Keykubat University
0000-0002-3285-7661
Türkiye

Publication Date December 10, 2017
Application Date November 10, 2017
Acceptance Date December 5, 2017
Published in Issue Year 2017, Volume 3, Issue 2

Cite

APA Çakmak, F. (2017). A Case Study on Teacher Practice of Genre-Based Writing and Classroom Interaction Patterns at an Advanced Level . The Literacy Trek , 3 (2) , 114-129 . Retrieved from https://dergipark.org.tr/en/pub/literacytrek/issue/32167/350953

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