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Possibilities of Killing Weeds by Microwave Power

Year 2016, Volume 12, Issue 4, 285 - 288, 14.10.2016

Abstract

Weeds are the main problems for organic and traditional cropping system. According to

the researches, it was found that weeds decrease the yield by 21-61% especially in cotton and

corn production. Herbicides use for controlling weeds destroys the environment and increases the

cost. Recently microwave applications are considered for controlling weed plants due to the

growing concerns about herbicide resistance and chemical residues in the environment. Recent

studies proved that microwave can kill the weeds effectively.

In this study, the possibilities of using microwave energy to kill the weeds between the rows were

investigated in corn and cotton production at laboratory conditions. Four weed varieties cocklebur

(Xanthium strumarium), Johnson Grass (Sorghum halepense (L.)), Black Nightshade (Solanum

nigrum), Bermuda Grass (Cynodon dactylon) were selected since they are the most common weeds

found at corn and cotton production. In the experiment, weeds with three different development

stages: weeds with four leaves, eight leaves and weeds at seeding stage were exposed to

minimum 0.8 kW and maximum 5.6 kW microwave power with four different forward speeds were

0.05 –0.1 – 0.3 - 1 m s-1.

According to the results; all four types of weeds were be able to be killed by microwave

applications. The required microwave power to kill the weeds increased with increasing forward

speed. It was found that forward speed of 1 m s-1 was not effective to kill the weeds with

maximum power of 5.6 kW. All four weeds required more power for killing when they are at late

growing stages. Generally, cocklebur and Black Nightshade required less power comparing Johnson

Grass and Bermuda Grass. Bermuda Grass was the only weed which required maximum 5.6 kW

microwave power level at all forward speeds at laboratory conditions.

References

  • Ark, P. A. and W. Parry, 1940. Application of High-Frequency Electrostatic Fields in Agriculture. The Quarterly Review of Biology. 15(2): 172-191.
  • Bebawi, F. F., Cooper, A. P., Brodie, G., Madigan, I., Vitelli, B., Worsley, A., J. S. and Davis, K. M. 2007. Effect of microwave radiation on seed mortality of rubber vine (Cryptostegia grandiflora R.Br.), parthenium (Parthenium hysterophorous L.) and bellyache bush (Jatropha gossypiifolia L.). Plant Protection Quarterly. 22(4): 136- 142.
  • Brodie, G., G. Harris, L. Pasma,, A. Travers, , D. Leyson, , C. Lancaster, and J. Woodworth, 2009. Microwave Soil Heating for Controlling Ryegrass Seed Germination.
  • Transactions of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers. 52(1): 295-302.
  • Brodie, G., C. Botta, and J. Woodworth, 2007. Preliminary Investigation into Microwave Soil Pasteurization Using Wheat as a Test Species. Plant Protection Quarterly. 22(2): 72-75
  • Brodie, G., S. Hamilton, and J. Woodworth, 2007. An Assessment of Microwave Soil Pasteurization for Killing Seeds and Weeds. Plant Protection Quarterly. 22(4): 143-149
  • Burnside, O. C., R. S. Moomaw, , F. W. Roeth, , G. A. Wicks, and R. G. Wilson, 1986. Weed Seed Demise in Soil in Weed-Free Crn (Zea mays) Production Across Nabraska. Weed Science. 34(2): 248-251
  • Davis, F. S., Wayland, J. R. and Merkle, M. G. 1971. Ultrahigh-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields for Weed Control: Phytotoxicity and Selectivity. Science. 173(3996): 535-537.
  • Davis, F. S., J. R. Wayland, and M. G. Merkle, 1973. Phytotoxicity of a UHF Electromagnetic Field. Nature. 241(5387): 291-292.
  • Heap, I. M. 1997. The Occurrence of Herbicide-resistant Weeds Worldwide. Pesticide Science. 51(3): 235-243. Kremer, R. J. 1993. Management of Weed Seed Banks with Microorganisms. Ecological Applications. 3(1): 42-52.
  • Nelson, S. O. and L. E. Stetson, 1985. Germination Responses of Selected Plant Species to RF Electrical Seed Treatment. Transactions of the ASAE. 28(6): 2051- 2058.
  • Nelson, S. O. 1996. A Review and Assessment of Microwave Energy for Soil Treatment to Control Pests. Transactions of the ASAE. 39(1): 281-289.
  • Tran, V. N. 1979. Effects of Microwave Energy on the Strophiole, Seed Coat and Germination of Acacia Seeds. Australian Journal of Plant Physiology. 6(3): 277-287.
  • Tran, V. N. and A. K Cavanagh. 1979. Effects of Microwave Energy on Acacia Longifolia. Journal of Microwave Power. 14(1): 21-27.

Possibilities of Killing Weeds by Microwave Power

Year 2016, Volume 12, Issue 4, 285 - 288, 14.10.2016

Abstract

Weeds are the main problems for organic and traditional cropping system. According to

the researches, it was found that weeds decrease the yield by 21-61% especially in cotton and

corn production. Herbicides use for controlling weeds destroys the environment and increases the

cost. Recently microwave applications are considered for controlling weed plants due to the

growing concerns about herbicide resistance and chemical residues in the environment. Recent

studies proved that microwave can kill the weeds effectively.

In this study, the possibilities of using microwave energy to kill the weeds between the rows were

investigated in corn and cotton production at laboratory conditions. Four weed varieties cocklebur

(Xanthium strumarium), Johnson Grass (Sorghum halepense (L.)), Black Nightshade (Solanum

nigrum), Bermuda Grass (Cynodon dactylon) were selected since they are the most common weeds

found at corn and cotton production. In the experiment, weeds with three different development

stages: weeds with four leaves, eight leaves and weeds at seeding stage were exposed to

minimum 0.8 kW and maximum 5.6 kW microwave power with four different forward speeds were

0.05 –0.1 – 0.3 - 1 m s-1.

According to the results; all four types of weeds were be able to be killed by microwave

applications. The required microwave power to kill the weeds increased with increasing forward

speed. It was found that forward speed of 1 m s-1 was not effective to kill the weeds with

maximum power of 5.6 kW. All four weeds required more power for killing when they are at late

growing stages. Generally, cocklebur and Black Nightshade required less power comparing Johnson

Grass and Bermuda Grass. Bermuda Grass was the only weed which required maximum 5.6 kW

microwave power level at all forward speeds at laboratory conditions.

References

  • Ark, P. A. and W. Parry, 1940. Application of High-Frequency Electrostatic Fields in Agriculture. The Quarterly Review of Biology. 15(2): 172-191.
  • Bebawi, F. F., Cooper, A. P., Brodie, G., Madigan, I., Vitelli, B., Worsley, A., J. S. and Davis, K. M. 2007. Effect of microwave radiation on seed mortality of rubber vine (Cryptostegia grandiflora R.Br.), parthenium (Parthenium hysterophorous L.) and bellyache bush (Jatropha gossypiifolia L.). Plant Protection Quarterly. 22(4): 136- 142.
  • Brodie, G., G. Harris, L. Pasma,, A. Travers, , D. Leyson, , C. Lancaster, and J. Woodworth, 2009. Microwave Soil Heating for Controlling Ryegrass Seed Germination.
  • Transactions of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers. 52(1): 295-302.
  • Brodie, G., C. Botta, and J. Woodworth, 2007. Preliminary Investigation into Microwave Soil Pasteurization Using Wheat as a Test Species. Plant Protection Quarterly. 22(2): 72-75
  • Brodie, G., S. Hamilton, and J. Woodworth, 2007. An Assessment of Microwave Soil Pasteurization for Killing Seeds and Weeds. Plant Protection Quarterly. 22(4): 143-149
  • Burnside, O. C., R. S. Moomaw, , F. W. Roeth, , G. A. Wicks, and R. G. Wilson, 1986. Weed Seed Demise in Soil in Weed-Free Crn (Zea mays) Production Across Nabraska. Weed Science. 34(2): 248-251
  • Davis, F. S., Wayland, J. R. and Merkle, M. G. 1971. Ultrahigh-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields for Weed Control: Phytotoxicity and Selectivity. Science. 173(3996): 535-537.
  • Davis, F. S., J. R. Wayland, and M. G. Merkle, 1973. Phytotoxicity of a UHF Electromagnetic Field. Nature. 241(5387): 291-292.
  • Heap, I. M. 1997. The Occurrence of Herbicide-resistant Weeds Worldwide. Pesticide Science. 51(3): 235-243. Kremer, R. J. 1993. Management of Weed Seed Banks with Microorganisms. Ecological Applications. 3(1): 42-52.
  • Nelson, S. O. and L. E. Stetson, 1985. Germination Responses of Selected Plant Species to RF Electrical Seed Treatment. Transactions of the ASAE. 28(6): 2051- 2058.
  • Nelson, S. O. 1996. A Review and Assessment of Microwave Energy for Soil Treatment to Control Pests. Transactions of the ASAE. 39(1): 281-289.
  • Tran, V. N. 1979. Effects of Microwave Energy on the Strophiole, Seed Coat and Germination of Acacia Seeds. Australian Journal of Plant Physiology. 6(3): 277-287.
  • Tran, V. N. and A. K Cavanagh. 1979. Effects of Microwave Energy on Acacia Longifolia. Journal of Microwave Power. 14(1): 21-27.

Details

Primary Language English
Subjects Science
Journal Section Articles
Authors

Ikbal AYGUN
0000-0003-1144-913X
Türkiye


Engin CAKIR
Türkiye


Koray KACAN This is me
Türkiye

Publication Date October 14, 2016
Published in Issue Year 2016, Volume 12, Issue 4

Cite

APA Aygun, I. , Cakır, E. & Kacan, K. (2016). Possibilities of Killing Weeds by Microwave Power . Tarım Makinaları Bilimi Dergisi , 12 (4) , 285-288 . Retrieved from https://dergipark.org.tr/en/pub/tarmak/issue/35304/408237

Journal of Agricultural Machinery Science is a refereed scientific journal published by the Agricultural Machinery Association as 3 issues a year.