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BibTex RIS Kaynak Göster
Yıl 2019, Cilt: 1 Sayı: 1, 11 - 15, 12.04.2019

Öz

Kaynakça

  • Acquisti, A. & Gross, R. (2006). Imagined communities: Awareness, information sharing, and privacy on the Facebook. In International workshop on privacy enhancing Technologies (pp. 36-58). Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
  • Aydın, S. (2012). A review of research on Facebook as an educational environment. Educational Technology Research and Development, 60(6), 1093–1106.
  • Balçıkanlı, C. (2015). Prospective English language teachers’ experiences in Facebook: Adoption, use and educational use in Turkish context. IJEDICT, 11(3), 82-99.
  • Bateman, D. and Willems, J. (2012). Facing off: Facebook and higher education in Misbehavior online in higher education. Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
  • Blattner, G. & Fiori, M. (2009). Facebook in the language classroom: Promises and possibilities. International Journal of Instructional Technology and Distance Learning, 6(1), 17-28.
  • Borau, K., Ullrich, C., Feng, J. and Shen, R. (2009). Microblogging for language learning: Using twitter to train communicative and cultural competence. International Conference on Web-based Learning (pp. 78-87). Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
  • Brown, H. (1994). Teaching by principles. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.
  • Chen, W. and Lee, K. H. (2013). Sharing, liking, commenting, and distressed? The pathway between Facebook interaction and psychological distress. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, & Social Networking, 16 (10), 728–734.
  • Debatin, B., Lovejoy, J. P., Horn, A. K and Hughes, B. N. (2009). Facebook and online privacy: Attitudes, behaviors, and unintended consequences. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 15(1), 83–108.
  • Dweyer, C., Hiltz, S. R. & Passerini K. (2007). Trust and privacy concern within social networking sites: A comparison of Facebook and MySpace. Proceedings of the Thirteenth Americas Conference on Information Systems (pp. 339-350). Keystone: Colorado.
  • Ellis, R. (1991). The interaction hypothesis: A critical evaluation. In E. Sadtono (Eds.), Language acquisition in the second/foreign language classroom (Anthology Series 28, pp. 179–211). Singapore: SEMEO, Regional Language Centre.
  • Ellison, N. B. (2008). Introduction: Reshaping campus communication and community through social network sites. In G. Salaway, J. B. Caruso, and M. R. Nelson (Eds.), The ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology (pp. 19-32). Boulder, CO: EDUCAUSE Center for Applied Research.
  • Godwin-Jones, R. (2008). Web-writing 2.0: Enabling, documenting, and assessing writing online. Language Learning & Technology, 12(2), 7–13.Hatch, E. (1978). Acquisition of syntax in a second language. In J. Richards (Ed.), Understanding second and foreign language learning (pp. 34-70). Rowley, MA: Newbury House.
  • Kabilan, M. K., Ahmad, N. and Abidin, M. J. Z. (2010). Facebook: An online environment for learning of English in institutions of higher education? The Internet and Higher Education, 13(4), 179–187.
  • Krashen, S. D. (1981). Second language acquisition and second language learning. USA: Pergamon Press.
  • Krashen, S (1985). The Input Hypothesis: Issues and Implications. London: Longman.
  • Labinowicz, E. (1980). The Piaget primer: Thinking, learning, teaching. California: Addison Wesley.
  • Long, M. H. (1990). Task, group, and task-group interactions. Language Teaching Methodology for the Nineties. Anthology Series, 24, 31-53.
  • Long, M. H. (1996). The role of the linguistic environment in second language acquisition. In W. C. Ritchie & T. K. Bhatia (Eds.), Handbook of second language acquisition (pp. 413–468). New York: Academic Press.
  • Mackey, A. (1999). Input, interaction and second language development. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 21(4), 557-587.
  • Mathias, A. (2011). The fakebook generation. In Kirszner, and Mandell (Eds). The Blair Reader (pp. 239-24). Boston: Prentice Hall.
  • McBride, K. (2009). Social-networking sites in foreign language classes: Opportunities for re-creation. In L. Lomicka & G. Lord (Eds.), The next generation: Social networking and online collaboration in foreign language learning (pp. 35-58). San Marcos, Texas: CALICO.
  • Mead, G. H. (1934). Mind, Self, and Society. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Pempek, T. A, Yermoyeleva, Y. A and Calvert, S. A. (2009). College students' social networking experiences on Facebook. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 30(3), 227-238.
  • Peterson, C. and McCabe, A. (1994). A social interactionist account of developing decontextualized narrative skill. Developmental Psychology, 30(6), 937-948.
  • Sykes, J. M., Oskoz, A. and Thorne, S. L. (2008). Web 2.0, synthetic immersive environments, and mobile resources for language education. CALICO Journal, 25(3), 528-546.
  • Verma, R. B. S. (2010). Principles, skills and models of group work practice. In Thomas Gracious (Ed.), Social work intervention with individuals and groups (pp. 212-241). Maidan Garhi: New Delhi.
  • Long, M. H. (1985). Input and second language acquisition theory. In S. M. Gass & C. G. Madden (Eds.), Input in second language acquisition (pp. 377–393). Rowley, MA: Newbury House.

Facebook as an Interactional Environment in the Foreign Language Learning Context

Yıl 2019, Cilt: 1 Sayı: 1, 11 - 15, 12.04.2019

Öz

Today, Facebook, as a sample of Web 2.0 and social media tool, has considerable effects on communication and interaction among individuals. Related literature also suggests that Facebook can be an educational tool in the learning and teaching contexts. Considered that the nature of foreign language learning directly relates to interactions among learners, how Facebook can be used as an interactional tool among foreign language learners should be clarified in relation to current theories and hypotheses. Thus, this paper discusses the role of Facebook as an interactional tool in a theoretical framework. For this purpose, the study first introduces the role of interaction in the foreign language teaching and learning contexts. Then, it focuses on the relationship between Facebook and interaction in the mentioned processes in the scope of theoretical background. The paper concludes that Facebook is an ideal platform for interaction in the foreign language learning and teaching contexts. Finally, the paper ends with recommendations for target groups and researchers.    

Kaynakça

  • Acquisti, A. & Gross, R. (2006). Imagined communities: Awareness, information sharing, and privacy on the Facebook. In International workshop on privacy enhancing Technologies (pp. 36-58). Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
  • Aydın, S. (2012). A review of research on Facebook as an educational environment. Educational Technology Research and Development, 60(6), 1093–1106.
  • Balçıkanlı, C. (2015). Prospective English language teachers’ experiences in Facebook: Adoption, use and educational use in Turkish context. IJEDICT, 11(3), 82-99.
  • Bateman, D. and Willems, J. (2012). Facing off: Facebook and higher education in Misbehavior online in higher education. Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
  • Blattner, G. & Fiori, M. (2009). Facebook in the language classroom: Promises and possibilities. International Journal of Instructional Technology and Distance Learning, 6(1), 17-28.
  • Borau, K., Ullrich, C., Feng, J. and Shen, R. (2009). Microblogging for language learning: Using twitter to train communicative and cultural competence. International Conference on Web-based Learning (pp. 78-87). Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
  • Brown, H. (1994). Teaching by principles. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.
  • Chen, W. and Lee, K. H. (2013). Sharing, liking, commenting, and distressed? The pathway between Facebook interaction and psychological distress. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, & Social Networking, 16 (10), 728–734.
  • Debatin, B., Lovejoy, J. P., Horn, A. K and Hughes, B. N. (2009). Facebook and online privacy: Attitudes, behaviors, and unintended consequences. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 15(1), 83–108.
  • Dweyer, C., Hiltz, S. R. & Passerini K. (2007). Trust and privacy concern within social networking sites: A comparison of Facebook and MySpace. Proceedings of the Thirteenth Americas Conference on Information Systems (pp. 339-350). Keystone: Colorado.
  • Ellis, R. (1991). The interaction hypothesis: A critical evaluation. In E. Sadtono (Eds.), Language acquisition in the second/foreign language classroom (Anthology Series 28, pp. 179–211). Singapore: SEMEO, Regional Language Centre.
  • Ellison, N. B. (2008). Introduction: Reshaping campus communication and community through social network sites. In G. Salaway, J. B. Caruso, and M. R. Nelson (Eds.), The ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology (pp. 19-32). Boulder, CO: EDUCAUSE Center for Applied Research.
  • Godwin-Jones, R. (2008). Web-writing 2.0: Enabling, documenting, and assessing writing online. Language Learning & Technology, 12(2), 7–13.Hatch, E. (1978). Acquisition of syntax in a second language. In J. Richards (Ed.), Understanding second and foreign language learning (pp. 34-70). Rowley, MA: Newbury House.
  • Kabilan, M. K., Ahmad, N. and Abidin, M. J. Z. (2010). Facebook: An online environment for learning of English in institutions of higher education? The Internet and Higher Education, 13(4), 179–187.
  • Krashen, S. D. (1981). Second language acquisition and second language learning. USA: Pergamon Press.
  • Krashen, S (1985). The Input Hypothesis: Issues and Implications. London: Longman.
  • Labinowicz, E. (1980). The Piaget primer: Thinking, learning, teaching. California: Addison Wesley.
  • Long, M. H. (1990). Task, group, and task-group interactions. Language Teaching Methodology for the Nineties. Anthology Series, 24, 31-53.
  • Long, M. H. (1996). The role of the linguistic environment in second language acquisition. In W. C. Ritchie & T. K. Bhatia (Eds.), Handbook of second language acquisition (pp. 413–468). New York: Academic Press.
  • Mackey, A. (1999). Input, interaction and second language development. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 21(4), 557-587.
  • Mathias, A. (2011). The fakebook generation. In Kirszner, and Mandell (Eds). The Blair Reader (pp. 239-24). Boston: Prentice Hall.
  • McBride, K. (2009). Social-networking sites in foreign language classes: Opportunities for re-creation. In L. Lomicka & G. Lord (Eds.), The next generation: Social networking and online collaboration in foreign language learning (pp. 35-58). San Marcos, Texas: CALICO.
  • Mead, G. H. (1934). Mind, Self, and Society. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Pempek, T. A, Yermoyeleva, Y. A and Calvert, S. A. (2009). College students' social networking experiences on Facebook. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 30(3), 227-238.
  • Peterson, C. and McCabe, A. (1994). A social interactionist account of developing decontextualized narrative skill. Developmental Psychology, 30(6), 937-948.
  • Sykes, J. M., Oskoz, A. and Thorne, S. L. (2008). Web 2.0, synthetic immersive environments, and mobile resources for language education. CALICO Journal, 25(3), 528-546.
  • Verma, R. B. S. (2010). Principles, skills and models of group work practice. In Thomas Gracious (Ed.), Social work intervention with individuals and groups (pp. 212-241). Maidan Garhi: New Delhi.
  • Long, M. H. (1985). Input and second language acquisition theory. In S. M. Gass & C. G. Madden (Eds.), Input in second language acquisition (pp. 377–393). Rowley, MA: Newbury House.

Ayrıntılar

Birincil Dil İngilizce
Konular Eğitim Üzerine Çalışmalar
Bölüm Original Article
Yazarlar

Rabia BÖREKCİ 0000-0001-5678-7365

Yayımlanma Tarihi 12 Nisan 2019
Yayımlandığı Sayı Yıl 2019 Cilt: 1 Sayı: 1

Kaynak Göster

APA BÖREKCİ, R. (2019). Facebook as an Interactional Environment in the Foreign Language Learning Context. Language and Technology, 1(1), 11-15.

Language and Technology