Year 2018, Volume 18 , Issue 74, Pages 25 - 40 2018-03-20

An Integrated Curriculum at an Islamic University: Perceptions of Students and Lecturers

Bambang SURYADI [1] , Fika EKAYANTI [2] , Euis AMALIA [3]


Purpose: The aim of our study was to identify the perceptions of students and lecturers at Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University Jakarta (UIN Jakarta) regarding the concept of an integrated curriculum implemented at the university, differences in perceptions between the two groups, and problems encountered during the curriculum’s implementation Methods: A descriptive quantitative research study was conducted with 670 students and 90 lecturers from 11 faculties at UIN Jakarta. The student samples consisted of 270 men and 400 women, while lecturer samples consisted of 44 men and 46 women. Data were collected via interviews and a perceptual questionnaire consisting of 54 items scored on a 4-point Likert scale. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, a t test, and confirmatory factor analysis.

Findings: Although both students and lecturers had positive perceptions of the concept of the integrated curriculum, the students’ perceptions were more favorable than the lecturers’. Problems encountered during the implementation of the integrated curriculum included the absence of clear guidelines for implementing the integrated curriculum, the lack of lecturers’ competencies to implement the integration in learning processes, the lack of specific nomenclature about the integration concept, and limited time allotted to learning Islamic studies in the natural sciences program.

Implications for Research and Practice: Few obstacles have hindered the successful implementation of the integrated curriculum throughout the faculties at UIN Jakarta. The findings have informed the development of a blueprint and clear guidelines for implementing an integrated curriculum that other Islamic institutions of higher education in Indonesia and other countries can use to deliver integrated studies.

perceptions, integrated curriculum, religion, science, Islamic studies
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Primary Language en
Journal Section Articles
Authors

Author: Bambang SURYADI

Author: Fika EKAYANTI

Author: Euis AMALIA

Dates

Publication Date : March 20, 2018

Bibtex @research article { ejer512424, journal = {Eurasian Journal of Educational Research}, issn = {1302-597X}, eissn = {2528-8911}, address = {}, publisher = {Anı Yayıncılık Eğitim ve Danışmanlık Ltd. Şti.}, year = {2018}, volume = {18}, pages = {25 - 40}, doi = {}, title = {An Integrated Curriculum at an Islamic University: Perceptions of Students and Lecturers}, key = {cite}, author = {Suryadı, Bambang and Ekayantı, Fika and Amalıa, Euis} }
APA Suryadı, B , Ekayantı, F , Amalıa, E . (2018). An Integrated Curriculum at an Islamic University: Perceptions of Students and Lecturers . Eurasian Journal of Educational Research , 18 (74) , 25-40 . Retrieved from https://dergipark.org.tr/en/pub/ejer/issue/42528/512424
MLA Suryadı, B , Ekayantı, F , Amalıa, E . "An Integrated Curriculum at an Islamic University: Perceptions of Students and Lecturers" . Eurasian Journal of Educational Research 18 (2018 ): 25-40 <https://dergipark.org.tr/en/pub/ejer/issue/42528/512424>
Chicago Suryadı, B , Ekayantı, F , Amalıa, E . "An Integrated Curriculum at an Islamic University: Perceptions of Students and Lecturers". Eurasian Journal of Educational Research 18 (2018 ): 25-40
RIS TY - JOUR T1 - An Integrated Curriculum at an Islamic University: Perceptions of Students and Lecturers AU - Bambang Suryadı , Fika Ekayantı , Euis Amalıa Y1 - 2018 PY - 2018 N1 - DO - T2 - Eurasian Journal of Educational Research JF - Journal JO - JOR SP - 25 EP - 40 VL - 18 IS - 74 SN - 1302-597X-2528-8911 M3 - UR - Y2 - 2021 ER -
EndNote %0 Eurasian Journal of Educational Research An Integrated Curriculum at an Islamic University: Perceptions of Students and Lecturers %A Bambang Suryadı , Fika Ekayantı , Euis Amalıa %T An Integrated Curriculum at an Islamic University: Perceptions of Students and Lecturers %D 2018 %J Eurasian Journal of Educational Research %P 1302-597X-2528-8911 %V 18 %N 74 %R %U
ISNAD Suryadı, Bambang , Ekayantı, Fika , Amalıa, Euis . "An Integrated Curriculum at an Islamic University: Perceptions of Students and Lecturers". Eurasian Journal of Educational Research 18 / 74 (March 2018): 25-40 .
AMA Suryadı B , Ekayantı F , Amalıa E . An Integrated Curriculum at an Islamic University: Perceptions of Students and Lecturers. Eurasian Journal of Educational Research. 2018; 18(74): 25-40.
Vancouver Suryadı B , Ekayantı F , Amalıa E . An Integrated Curriculum at an Islamic University: Perceptions of Students and Lecturers. Eurasian Journal of Educational Research. 2018; 18(74): 25-40.
IEEE B. Suryadı , F. Ekayantı and E. Amalıa , "An Integrated Curriculum at an Islamic University: Perceptions of Students and Lecturers", Eurasian Journal of Educational Research, vol. 18, no. 74, pp. 25-40, Mar. 2018