Year 2016, Volume 4 , Issue 2, Pages 29 - 42 2016-12-01

Where Are All the Talented Girls? How Can We Help Them Achieve in Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics?

Monica MEADOWS [1]


Women’s participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) courses and careers lags behind that of men. Multiple factors contribute to the underrepresentation of women and girls in STEM. Academic research suggests three areas, which account for the under representation of girls in STEM: social and environmental factors, the school climate and the influence of bias. In order to engage and to retain girls in STEM, educators need to: eliminate bias in the classroom, change school culture, introduce female role models, help girls assess their abilities accurately and develop talent in areas related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Educators should encourage young girls to ask questions about the world, to problem solve, and to develop creativity through play and experimentation. Women have made impressive gains in science and engineering but remain a distinct minority in many science and engineering fields. Creating environments that support girls’ and women’s achievements and interests in science and engineering will encourage more girls and women to pursue careers in these vital fields.

girls, science, technology, engineering, mathematics, gifted, underachievement
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Primary Language en
Journal Section STEM Education
Authors

Author: Monica MEADOWS (Primary Author)
Institution: University of Arkansas
Country: United States


Dates

Publication Date : December 1, 2016

Bibtex @research article { jegys431384, journal = {Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists}, issn = {}, eissn = {2149-360X}, address = {editorjegys@gmail.com}, publisher = {Genç Bilge Yayıncılık}, year = {2016}, volume = {4}, pages = {29 - 42}, doi = {}, title = {Where Are All the Talented Girls? How Can We Help Them Achieve in Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics?}, key = {cite}, author = {Meadows, Monica} }
APA Meadows, M . (2016). Where Are All the Talented Girls? How Can We Help Them Achieve in Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics?. Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists , 4 (2) , 29-42 . Retrieved from https://dergipark.org.tr/en/pub/jegys/issue/37320/431384
MLA Meadows, M . "Where Are All the Talented Girls? How Can We Help Them Achieve in Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics?". Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists 4 (2016 ): 29-42 <https://dergipark.org.tr/en/pub/jegys/issue/37320/431384>
Chicago Meadows, M . "Where Are All the Talented Girls? How Can We Help Them Achieve in Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics?". Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists 4 (2016 ): 29-42
RIS TY - JOUR T1 - Where Are All the Talented Girls? How Can We Help Them Achieve in Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics? AU - Monica Meadows Y1 - 2016 PY - 2016 N1 - DO - T2 - Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists JF - Journal JO - JOR SP - 29 EP - 42 VL - 4 IS - 2 SN - -2149-360X M3 - UR - Y2 - 2018 ER -
EndNote %0 Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists Where Are All the Talented Girls? How Can We Help Them Achieve in Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics? %A Monica Meadows %T Where Are All the Talented Girls? How Can We Help Them Achieve in Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics? %D 2016 %J Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists %P -2149-360X %V 4 %N 2 %R %U
ISNAD Meadows, Monica . "Where Are All the Talented Girls? How Can We Help Them Achieve in Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics?". Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists 4 / 2 (December 2016): 29-42 .
AMA Meadows M . Where Are All the Talented Girls? How Can We Help Them Achieve in Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics?. JEGYS. 2016; 4(2): 29-42.
Vancouver Meadows M . Where Are All the Talented Girls? How Can We Help Them Achieve in Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics?. Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists. 2016; 4(2): 42-29.