Year 2021, Volume 9 , Issue 1, Pages 67 - 73 2021-03-15

The effects of birth order and family size on academic achievement, divergent thinking, and problem finding among gifted students

Aseel ALSALEH [1] , Ahmed ABDULLA ALABBASİ [2] , Alaa Eldin AYOUB [3] , Amnah HAFSYAN [4]


The current study explored the influence of birth order and family size on academic achievement, divergent thinking (DT), and problem finding (PF) with a sample of 156 gifted male and female Arab students (M= 12.21 years, SD= 1.75). Regarding academic achievement, it was found that first-borns possessed higher grade point averages (GPAs) than did other-born children. Family size was also related to academic achievement-participants from smaller-sized families had significantly higher GPAs compared with gifted students from middle- and large-sized families. As for the influence of birth order and family size on both DT and PF, a multivariate analysis of variance showed significant differences for birth order and the interaction between birth order and family size in the originality dimension of PF. Non-significant differences were found concerning family size. The follow-up analyses of variance showed that later-born gifted students scored higher than first-, second-, third-, and fourth-born children in PF originality. Later-born gifted students who scored higher on originality were from smaller families. No significant influences for birth order and family size were found concerning fluency for both DT and PF as well as DT originality. Limitations and future directions are discussed.
Birth order, family size, academic achievement, divergent thinking, problem finding
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Primary Language en
Subjects Education and Educational Research
Published Date March 2021
Journal Section Thinking Skills
Authors

Orcid: 0000-0003-4652-2341
Author: Aseel ALSALEH
Institution: Arabian Gulf University
Country: Bahrain


Orcid: 0000-0002-4773-4955
Author: Ahmed ABDULLA ALABBASİ (Primary Author)
Institution: Arabian Gulf University
Country: Bahrain


Orcid: 0000-0002-3506-4835
Author: Alaa Eldin AYOUB
Institution: Arabian Gulf University
Country: Bahrain


Orcid: 0000-0001-9821-4872
Author: Amnah HAFSYAN
Institution: Arabian Gulf University
Country: Bahrain


Dates

Publication Date : March 15, 2021

Bibtex @research article { jegys864399, journal = {Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists}, issn = {}, eissn = {2149-360X}, address = {editorjegys@gmail.com}, publisher = {Genç Bilge Yayıncılık}, year = {2021}, volume = {9}, pages = {67 - 73}, doi = {10.17478/jegys.864399}, title = {The effects of birth order and family size on academic achievement, divergent thinking, and problem finding among gifted students}, key = {cite}, author = {Alsaleh, Aseel and Abdulla Alabbasi, Ahmed and Ayoub, Alaa Eldin and Hafsyan, Amnah} }
APA Alsaleh, A , Abdulla Alabbasi, A , Ayoub, A , Hafsyan, A . (2021). The effects of birth order and family size on academic achievement, divergent thinking, and problem finding among gifted students . Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists , 9 (1) , 67-73 . DOI: 10.17478/jegys.864399
MLA Alsaleh, A , Abdulla Alabbasi, A , Ayoub, A , Hafsyan, A . "The effects of birth order and family size on academic achievement, divergent thinking, and problem finding among gifted students" . Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists 9 (2021 ): 67-73 <https://dergipark.org.tr/en/pub/jegys/issue/60293/864399>
Chicago Alsaleh, A , Abdulla Alabbasi, A , Ayoub, A , Hafsyan, A . "The effects of birth order and family size on academic achievement, divergent thinking, and problem finding among gifted students". Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists 9 (2021 ): 67-73
RIS TY - JOUR T1 - The effects of birth order and family size on academic achievement, divergent thinking, and problem finding among gifted students AU - Aseel Alsaleh , Ahmed Abdulla Alabbasi , Alaa Eldin Ayoub , Amnah Hafsyan Y1 - 2021 PY - 2021 N1 - doi: 10.17478/jegys.864399 DO - 10.17478/jegys.864399 T2 - Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists JF - Journal JO - JOR SP - 67 EP - 73 VL - 9 IS - 1 SN - -2149-360X M3 - doi: 10.17478/jegys.864399 UR - https://doi.org/10.17478/jegys.864399 Y2 - 2021 ER -
EndNote %0 Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists The effects of birth order and family size on academic achievement, divergent thinking, and problem finding among gifted students %A Aseel Alsaleh , Ahmed Abdulla Alabbasi , Alaa Eldin Ayoub , Amnah Hafsyan %T The effects of birth order and family size on academic achievement, divergent thinking, and problem finding among gifted students %D 2021 %J Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists %P -2149-360X %V 9 %N 1 %R doi: 10.17478/jegys.864399 %U 10.17478/jegys.864399
ISNAD Alsaleh, Aseel , Abdulla Alabbasi, Ahmed , Ayoub, Alaa Eldin , Hafsyan, Amnah . "The effects of birth order and family size on academic achievement, divergent thinking, and problem finding among gifted students". Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists 9 / 1 (March 2021): 67-73 . https://doi.org/10.17478/jegys.864399
AMA Alsaleh A , Abdulla Alabbasi A , Ayoub A , Hafsyan A . The effects of birth order and family size on academic achievement, divergent thinking, and problem finding among gifted students. JEGYS. 2021; 9(1): 67-73.
Vancouver Alsaleh A , Abdulla Alabbasi A , Ayoub A , Hafsyan A . The effects of birth order and family size on academic achievement, divergent thinking, and problem finding among gifted students. Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists. 2021; 9(1): 67-73.
IEEE A. Alsaleh , A. Abdulla Alabbasi , A. Ayoub and A. Hafsyan , "The effects of birth order and family size on academic achievement, divergent thinking, and problem finding among gifted students", Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 67-73, Mar. 2021, doi:10.17478/jegys.864399