Year 2020, Volume 7 , Issue 1, Pages 17 - 24 2020-04-15

The Evolution of The Term of Giftedness & Theories to Explain Gifted Characteristics
The Evolution of The Term of Giftedness & Theories to Explain Gifted Characteristics

Burak TÜRKMAN [1]


The term giftedness has been interpreted in many different ways throughout history depending on the area(s) of expertise of a researcher, the focus of a study, and the current trends of time. Each new definition has introduced a different dimension of giftedness to produce better representations for the gifted population and it’s diversity. The first portion of this paper summarizes the most common definitions of giftedness in education research and examines the evolution of the term giftedness in the classroom. The second portion of this paper highlights how researchers have characterized general traits of gifted students. Rather, during the course of this research a new definition emerged that considered diversity and uniqueness of the gifted students and of the environments that support their special talents. This definition asserts that there are two type of giftedness: active and dormant. Active giftedness manifests as outstanding potential in a defined area, influences others, promotes productivity, and active gifted students need differentiated services to maximize their potential. Dormant giftedness manifests when natural abilities shine through when its time to solve problems, produce ideas, or to be a leader. Dormant gifted students need rich, supportive learning environments to be motivated to bring forth their giftedness.
Keywords

The term giftedness has been interpreted in many different ways throughout history depending on the area(s) of expertise of a researcher, the focus of a study, and the current trends of time. Each new definition has introduced a different dimension of giftedness to produce better representations for the gifted population and it’s diversity. The first portion of this paper summarizes the most common definitions of giftedness in education research and examines the evolution of the term giftedness in the classroom. The second portion of this paper highlights how researchers have characterized general traits of gifted students. Rather, during the course of this research a new definition emerged that considered diversity and uniqueness of the gifted students and of the environments that support their special talents. This definition asserts that there are two type of giftedness: active and dormant. Active giftedness manifests as outstanding potential in a defined area, influences others, promotes productivity, and active gifted students need differentiated services to maximize their potential. Dormant giftedness manifests when natural abilities shine through when its time to solve problems, produce ideas, or to be a leader. Dormant gifted students need rich, supportive learning environments to be motivated to bring forth their giftedness. 

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Primary Language en
Subjects Education and Educational Research, Education, Special
Journal Section Gifted Education
Authors

Orcid: 0000-0002-5613-3895
Author: Burak TÜRKMAN (Primary Author)
Institution: HASAN ALİ YÜCEL EĞİTİM FAKÜLTESİ
Country: Turkey


Dates

Publication Date : April 15, 2020

APA TÜRKMAN, B . (2020). The Evolution of The Term of Giftedness & Theories to Explain Gifted Characteristics. Journal of Gifted Education and Creativity , 7 (1) , 17-24 . Retrieved from https://dergipark.org.tr/en/pub/jgedc/issue/52403/645722