Research Article
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Are gifted students challenge pursuers?

Year 2022, Volume 9, Issue 1, 43 - 55, 30.03.2022

Abstract

Challenging education has always been considered a necessity and a presupposition, but it has not been considered whether gifted students also have a challenging nature. This study answers this question and examines whether gifted students have a challenging nature and seek to face the challenge. Our study was conducted with two groups of fifth- and sixth-grade students of the same schools in Istanbul, Turkey: the study group consisted of 52 gifted students, and the control group consisted of 92 undiagnosed students. In about 15 minutes, participants completed the Challenge Performance Test and the Student Information Sheet. Data obtained from participants' responses to the challenge performance test were analyzed using a t-test, and the two study and control groups were compared based on the acceptance or rejection of challenges. As expected, the analysis of participants' responses showed that gifted students in the study group performed better in accepting the challenge than students in the control group and preferred more challenging questions. After the success or failure of the students at the level they had chosen, however, the preferred behaviors in terms of challenges were different. This was thought-provoking regarding the relationship between challenge and the meaning of giftedness.

References

  • Clark, B. (2017). Social ideologies and gifted education in today's schools. In Charting a New Course in Gifted Education (pp. 81-100). Routledge.
  • Clinkenbeard, P. K. (1991). Unfair expectations: A pilot study of middle school students' comparisons of gifted and regular classes. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 15, 56-63.
  • Çalıkoğlu, B. S., & Kahveci, N. G. (2015). Altering depth and complexity in the science curriculum for the gifted: results of an experiment. Asia-Pacific Forum on Science Learning and Teaching.
  • Calikoglu, B. S. (2019). Challenge-Oriented Behavior Types: A New Explanation. International Electronic Journal of Elementary Education, 12(2), 197-204.
  • Feldhusen, J. F., & Kroll, M. D. (1991). Boredom or challenge for the academically talented in school. Gifted Education International, 7(2), 80-81.
  • Feuchter, M. D., & Preckel, F. (2021). Reducing boredom in gifted education—Evaluating the effects of full-time ability grouping. Journal of Educational Psychology.
  • Gallagher, J. J. (2007). According to Jim: Another opportunity for preschool education. Roeper Review, 29, 231. doi:10.1080/02783190709554416.
  • Gallagher, J., Harradine, C. C., & Coleman, M. R. (1997). Challenge or boredom? Gifted students’ views on their schooling. Roeper Review, 19(3), 132-136.
  • Gentry, M., Gable, R. K., & Springer, P. (2000). Gifted and nongifted middle school students: Are their attitudes toward school different as measured by the new affective instrument, My Class Activities…?. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 24(1), 74-95.
  • Goldberg, Y. K., Eastwood, J. D., LaGuardia, J., & Danckert, J. (2011). Boredom: An emotional experience distinct from apathy, anhedonia, or depression. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 30(6), 647-666.
  • Humphreys, K. L., Lee, S. S., & Tottenham, N. (2013). Not all risk taking behavior is bad: Associative sensitivity predicts learning during risk taking among high sensation seekers. Personality and individual differences, 54(6), 709-715.
  • Hymes, R. M., & Bullock, F. O. (1975). Alternative Schools Answer To the Gifted Child's Boredom. Gifted Child Quarterly, 19(4), 340-345.
  • Kanevsky, L., & Keighley, T. (2003). To produce or not to produce? Understanding boredom and the honor in underachievement. Roeper Review, 26(1), 20-28.
  • LePera, N. (2011). Relationships between boredom proneness, mindfulness, anxiety, depression, and substance use. The New School Psychology Bulletin, 8(2), 15-25.
  • Linn-Cohen, R., & Hertzog, N. B. (2007). Unlocking the GATE to differentiation: A qualitative study of two self-contained gifted classes. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 31(2), 227-259.
  • Pabst, S., Brand, M., & Wolf, O. T. (2013). Stress and decision making: A few minutes make all the difference. Behavioural brain research, 250, 39-45.
  • Patterson, I., & Pegg, S. (1999). Nothing to do: the relationship between'leisure boredom'and alcohol and drug addiction: is there a link to youth suicide in rural Australia?. Youth Studies Australia, 18(2), 24-29.
  • Preckel, F., Götz, T., & Frenzel, A. (2010). Ability grouping of gifted students: Effects on academic self‐concept and boredom. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 80(3), 451-472.
  • Starcke, K., & Brand, M. (2012). Decision making under stress: a selective review. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 36(4), 1228-1248.
  • "Top students subject of ETS study." (1991, Fall). Teaching Exceptional Children, 71.
  • Tomlinson, C. A., & Strickland, C. A. (2005). Differentiation in practice: A resource guide for differentiating curriculum, grades 9-12. ASCD.
  • Weissinger E, Caldwell LL and Bandolas DL (1992) Relation between intrinsic motivation and boredom in leisure time. Leisure Sciences 14: 317–325.
  • Wegner, L., & Flisher, A. J. (2009). Leisure boredom and adolescent risk behaviour: A systematic literature review. Journal of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 21(1), 1-28.

Year 2022, Volume 9, Issue 1, 43 - 55, 30.03.2022

Abstract

References

  • Clark, B. (2017). Social ideologies and gifted education in today's schools. In Charting a New Course in Gifted Education (pp. 81-100). Routledge.
  • Clinkenbeard, P. K. (1991). Unfair expectations: A pilot study of middle school students' comparisons of gifted and regular classes. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 15, 56-63.
  • Çalıkoğlu, B. S., & Kahveci, N. G. (2015). Altering depth and complexity in the science curriculum for the gifted: results of an experiment. Asia-Pacific Forum on Science Learning and Teaching.
  • Calikoglu, B. S. (2019). Challenge-Oriented Behavior Types: A New Explanation. International Electronic Journal of Elementary Education, 12(2), 197-204.
  • Feldhusen, J. F., & Kroll, M. D. (1991). Boredom or challenge for the academically talented in school. Gifted Education International, 7(2), 80-81.
  • Feuchter, M. D., & Preckel, F. (2021). Reducing boredom in gifted education—Evaluating the effects of full-time ability grouping. Journal of Educational Psychology.
  • Gallagher, J. J. (2007). According to Jim: Another opportunity for preschool education. Roeper Review, 29, 231. doi:10.1080/02783190709554416.
  • Gallagher, J., Harradine, C. C., & Coleman, M. R. (1997). Challenge or boredom? Gifted students’ views on their schooling. Roeper Review, 19(3), 132-136.
  • Gentry, M., Gable, R. K., & Springer, P. (2000). Gifted and nongifted middle school students: Are their attitudes toward school different as measured by the new affective instrument, My Class Activities…?. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 24(1), 74-95.
  • Goldberg, Y. K., Eastwood, J. D., LaGuardia, J., & Danckert, J. (2011). Boredom: An emotional experience distinct from apathy, anhedonia, or depression. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 30(6), 647-666.
  • Humphreys, K. L., Lee, S. S., & Tottenham, N. (2013). Not all risk taking behavior is bad: Associative sensitivity predicts learning during risk taking among high sensation seekers. Personality and individual differences, 54(6), 709-715.
  • Hymes, R. M., & Bullock, F. O. (1975). Alternative Schools Answer To the Gifted Child's Boredom. Gifted Child Quarterly, 19(4), 340-345.
  • Kanevsky, L., & Keighley, T. (2003). To produce or not to produce? Understanding boredom and the honor in underachievement. Roeper Review, 26(1), 20-28.
  • LePera, N. (2011). Relationships between boredom proneness, mindfulness, anxiety, depression, and substance use. The New School Psychology Bulletin, 8(2), 15-25.
  • Linn-Cohen, R., & Hertzog, N. B. (2007). Unlocking the GATE to differentiation: A qualitative study of two self-contained gifted classes. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 31(2), 227-259.
  • Pabst, S., Brand, M., & Wolf, O. T. (2013). Stress and decision making: A few minutes make all the difference. Behavioural brain research, 250, 39-45.
  • Patterson, I., & Pegg, S. (1999). Nothing to do: the relationship between'leisure boredom'and alcohol and drug addiction: is there a link to youth suicide in rural Australia?. Youth Studies Australia, 18(2), 24-29.
  • Preckel, F., Götz, T., & Frenzel, A. (2010). Ability grouping of gifted students: Effects on academic self‐concept and boredom. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 80(3), 451-472.
  • Starcke, K., & Brand, M. (2012). Decision making under stress: a selective review. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 36(4), 1228-1248.
  • "Top students subject of ETS study." (1991, Fall). Teaching Exceptional Children, 71.
  • Tomlinson, C. A., & Strickland, C. A. (2005). Differentiation in practice: A resource guide for differentiating curriculum, grades 9-12. ASCD.
  • Weissinger E, Caldwell LL and Bandolas DL (1992) Relation between intrinsic motivation and boredom in leisure time. Leisure Sciences 14: 317–325.
  • Wegner, L., & Flisher, A. J. (2009). Leisure boredom and adolescent risk behaviour: A systematic literature review. Journal of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 21(1), 1-28.

Details

Primary Language English
Subjects Education, Special
Published Date March 2022
Journal Section Thinking Skills at Gifted Education
Authors

Burcu Seher ÇALIKOĞLU (Primary Author)
İzmir Demokrasi Üniversitesi
0000-0002-4085-8330
Türkiye

Publication Date March 30, 2022
Published in Issue Year 2022, Volume 9, Issue 1

Cite

APA Çalıkoğlu, B. S. (2022). Are gifted students challenge pursuers? . Journal of Gifted Education and Creativity , 9 (1) , 43-55 . Retrieved from https://dergipark.org.tr/en/pub/jgedc/issue/68496/1079501

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