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The theoretical roots of gifted and talented youth education programs: The CTY case example

Year 2022, Volume 9, Issue 3, 299 - 311, 30.09.2022

Abstract

The aim of this study is to examine past literature from a reductionist approach of findings derived from academically gifted and talented youth research, and to examine the factors explaining the roots of such abilities. Also explored are common human development theories of social information processing perspective, social cognitive, attachment and behavioral genetics. This analysis explores these theories and how they can be combined to allow for the best understanding of gifted ability. Detailed here is also the Johns Hopkins University Center for Talented Youth program as a model to show a current example of how theory is being applied to practice in a gifted youth setting. The writing concludes by discussing how research of combined theories on gifted abilities can further inform practice and understanding of gifted children’s abilities. Further, research suggestions are provided for meeting the gaps in literature on the roots of gifted youth abilities.

References

  • Ablard, K. E. (1997). Self‐perceptions and needs as a function of type of academic ability and gender. Roeper Review, 20(2), 110-115.
  • Ablard, K. E., & Mills, C. J. (1996). Implicit theories of intelligence and self-perceptions of academically talented adolescents and children. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 25(2), 137-148.
  • Ablard, K. E., & Parker, W. D. (1997). Parents' achievement goals and perfectionism in their academically talented children. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 26(6), 651-667.
  • Ablard, K. E. (2002). Achievement goals and implicit theories of intelligence among academically talented students. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 25(3), 215-232.
  • Bain, S. K. (2008). Flanagan, DP, & Harrison, PL (Eds.).(2005). Contemporary Intellectual Assessment—Theories, Tests, and Issues New York: Guilford Press.
  • Bandura, A. (1986). Social foundations of thought and action. Englewood Cliffs, NJ.
  • Bandura, A. (1989). Social cognitive theory. In R. Vasta (Ed.), Annals of child development (Vol. 6, pp. 1-60). Greenwich, CT: JAI Press.
  • Blackburn, C. C., & Brody, L. E. (1994). Family background characteristics of students who reason extremely well mathematically and/or verbally. In Talent development (Vol. 2, pp. 439-444). Dayton, OH: Ohio Psychology Press.
  • Bowlby, J. (1973).Attachment and loss: Separation, anxiety, and anger. New York: Basic Books.
  • Bowlby, J. (1980).Attachment and loss: Vol. 3. Loss: Sadness and depression. New York: Basic Books.
  • Bowlby, J. (1982).Attachment and loss: Attachment(rev. ed.). New York: Basic Books. (Original work published 1969).
  • Bowlby, J. (1988). A secure base. New York: Basic Books.
  • Brody, L. E., Barnett, L. B., & Mills, C. J. (1994). Gender differences among talented adolescents. In Competence and responsibility. The Third European Conference of the European Council for High Ability (pp. 204-210).
  • Brody, L. E., & Reis, S. M. (Eds.). (2004). Grouping and acceleration practices in gifted education. Corwin Press.
  • Campbell, R. J., Muijs, R. D., Neelands, J. G. A., Robinson, W., Eyre, D., & Hewston, R. (2007). The social origins of students identified as gifted and talented in England: a geodemographic analysis. Oxford Review of Education, 33(1), 103-120.
  • Chao, R. K. (1994). Beyond parental control and authoritarian parenting style: Understanding Chinese parenting through the cultural notion of training. Child development, 65(4), 1111-1119.
  • Chiang, M. C., Barysheva, M., Shattuck, D. W., Lee, A. D., Madsen, S. K., Avedissian, C., & Wright, M. J. (2009). Genetics of brain fiber architecture and intellectual performance. Journal of Neuroscience, 29(7), 2212-2224.
  • Croft, L. J. (2003). Teachers of the gifted: Gifted teachers. Handbook of gifted education, 3, 558-571.
  • Deary, I. J., Spinath, F. M., & Bates, T. C. (2006). Genetics of intelligence. European Journal of Human Genetics, 14(6), 690.
  • Deary, I. J., Penke, L., & Johnson, W. (2010). The neuroscience of human intelligence differences. Nature reviews neuroscience, 11(3), 201.
  • Dodge, K. A. (2014). A social information processing model of social competence in children. In Cognitive perspectives on children's social and behavioral development (pp. 85-134). Psychology Press.
  • Durden, W. G., Mills, C. J., & Barnett, L. B. (1990). Aspects of gender differentiation in the Johns Hopkins University Center for Talented Youth. Highly talented young women, 166-185.
  • Durden, W. G., & Mills, C. J. (1993). Talent derailed: the education establishment’s assault on ability grouping. Wisconsin Interest, 2(1), 43-50.
  • Dwairy, M. (2004). Parenting styles and mental health of Arab gifted adolescents. Gifted child quarterly, 48(4), 275-286.
  • Fiedler, E. D., Lange, R. E., & Winebrenner, S. (2002). In search of reality: Unraveling the myths about tracking, ability grouping, and the gifted. Roeper Review, 24(3), 108-111.
  • Brody, L., Fox, L. H., & Tobin, D. (1980). Women and the Mathematical Mystique:
  • Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Hyman Blumberg Symposium on Research in Early Childhood Education: Expanded Version of a Symposium of the American Association for the Advancement of Science Entitled 'Women and Mathematics'. Vol. 5. Johns Hopkins University Press.
  • Goldhaber, D. (2000). Theories of human development: Integrative perspectives. McGraw-Hill Humanities, Social Sciences & World Languages.
  • Howes, C., & Hamilton, C. E. (1992). Children's relationships with caregivers: Mothers and child care teachers. Child development, 63(4), 859-866.
  • Howes, C., Matheson, C. C., & Hamilton, C. E. (1994). Maternal, teacher, and child care history correlates of children's relationships with peers. Child development, 65(1), 264-273.
  • Ireson, J., & Hallam, S. (2009). Academic self-concepts in adolescence: Relations with achievement and ability grouping in schools. Learning and Instruction, 19(3), 201-213.
  • Klahr, D. (1989). Information-processing approaches. Annals of child development, 6, 133-185.
  • Kreppner, K., & Ullrich, M. (1998). Talk to mom and dad, and listen to what is in between: A differential approach to family communication and its impact on adolescent development. In Verbal interaction and development in families with adolescents (pp. 83-108). Ablex.
  • Kulik, J. A. (1992). An Analysis of the Research on Ability Grouping: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives. Research-Based Decision Making Series.
  • Loveless, T. (1998). The Tracking and Ability Grouping Debate. Volume 2, Number 8.
  • Lubinski, D., & Benbow, C. P. (1992). Gender differences in abilities and preferences among the gifted: Implications for the math-science pipeline. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 1(2), 61-66.
  • McCrae, R. R., Costa Jr, P. T., Terracciano, A., Parker, W. D., Mills, C. J., De Fruyt, F., & Mervielde, I. (2002). Personality trait development from age 12 to age 18: Longitudinal, cross-sectional and cross-cultural analyses. Journal of personality and social psychology, 83(6), 1456.
  • Mills, C. J., & Bohannon, W. E. (1980). Personality characteristics of effective state police officers. Journal of Applied Psychology, 65(6), 680.
  • Mills, C. J. (1981). Sex roles, personality, and intellectual abilities in adolescents. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 10(2), 85-112.
  • Mills, C. J. (1983). Personality characteristics of gifted adolescents and their parents: Comparisons and implications for achievement and counseling.
  • Mills, C. J., & Tangherlini, A. E. (1991). Finding the optimal match: Another look at ability grouping and cooperative learning. Equity & Excellence in Education, 25(2-4), 205-208.
  • Mills, C. J., & Durden, W. G. (1992). Cooperative learning and ability grouping: An issue of choice. Gifted Child Quarterly, 36(1), 11-16.
  • Mills, C. J. (1993). Personality, learning style and cognitive style profiles of mathematically talented students. European Journal of High Ability, 4(1), 70-85.
  • Mills, C. J., Moore, N. D., & Parker, W. D. (1996). Psychological type and cognitive style in elementary-age gifted students: Comparisons across age and gender. Journal of Psychological Type, 38, 13-23.
  • Mills, C. J., Ablard, K. E., & Stumpf, H. (1993). Gender differences in academically talented young students' mathematical reasoning: Patterns across age and subskills. Journal of Educational Psychology, 85(2), 340-346.
  • Mills, C. J., & Parker, W. D. (1998). Cognitive-psychological profiles of gifted adolescents from Ireland and the US: Cross-societal comparisons. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 22(1), 1-16.
  • Nelson, K. (1993). Events, narratives, memory: What develops. In Memory and affect in development. The minnesota symposia on child psychology (Vol. 26, pp. 1-24). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.
  • Oakland, T., Joyce, D., Horton, C., & Glutting, J. (2000). Temperament-based learning styles of identified gifted and nongifted students. Gifted Child Quarterly, 44(3), 183-189.
  • Parker, W. D., & Adkins, K. K. (1995). Perfectionism and the gifted. Roeper review, 17(3), 173-175.
  • Parker, W. D. (1998). Birth-order effects in the academically talented. Gifted Child Quarterly, 42(1), 29-38.
  • Parker, W. D., & Stumpf, H. (1998). A validation of the five-factor model of personality in academically talented youth across observers and instruments. Personality and Individual Differences, 25(6), 1005-1025.
  • Pianta, R. C. (1992). Conceptual and Methodological Issues in Research on Relationships between Children and Nonparental Adults. New directions for child development, 57, 121-29.
  • Preckel, F., Götz, T., & Frenzel, A. (2010). Ability grouping of gifted students: Effects on academic self‐concept and boredom. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 80(3), 451-472.
  • Robinson, J. P. (2008). Evidence of a differential effect of ability grouping on the reading achievement growth of language-minority Hispanics. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 30(2), 141-180.
  • Rogers, K. B. (2002). Re-forming gifted education: Matching the program to the child. Great Potential Press, Inc.
  • Rogers, K. B. (2006). A menu of options for grouping gifted students. Prufrock Press Inc.
  • Runco, M. A., & Okuda, S. M. (1993). Reaching creatively gifted children through their learning styles. Teaching and counseling gifted and talented adolescents: An international learning style perspective, 103-115.
  • Steinberg, L., Darling, N. E., Fletcher, A. C., Brown, B. B., & Dornbusch, S. M. (1995).
  • Authoritative parenting and adolescent adjustment: An ecological journey. Examining lives in context: Perspectives on the ecology of human development, 63, 2-3.
  • Sternberg, R. J., & Clinkenbeard, P. R. (1995). The triarchic model applied to identifying, teaching, and assessing gifted children.
  • Sternberg, R. J., & Zhang, L. F. (1995). What do we mean by giftedness? A pentagonal implicit theory. Gifted Child Quarterly, 39(2), 88-94.
  • Stumpf, H. (1995). Gender differences in performance on tests of cognitive abilities: Experimental design issues and empirical results. Learning and Individual Differences, 7(4), 275-287.
  • Tieso, C. L. (2003). Ability grouping is not just tracking anymore. Roeper Review, 26(1), 29-36.
  • Toga, A. W., & Thompson, P. M. (2005). Genetics of brain structure and intelligence. Annu. Rev. Neurosci., 28, 1-23.
  • Tsui, J. M., & Mazzocco, M. M. (2007). Mathematics and perfectionism: Effects of math anxiety and perfectionism on timed versus untimed math testing in mathematically gifted sixth graders. Roeper Review, 29(2), 132-139.
  • Van Ijzendoorn, M. H., & Tavecchio, L. W. (1987). The development of attachment theory as a Lakatosian research program: Philosophical and methodological aspects. In Advances in Psychology (Vol. 44, pp. 3-31). North-Holland.
  • Waters, E., Merrick, S., Treboux, D., Crowell, J., & Albersheim, L. (2000). Attachment security in infancy and early adulthood: A twenty‐year longitudinal study. Child development, 71(3), 684-689.
  • Ybarra, L. (Producer). (2009, June). Center for talented youth [Audio Podcast]. Johns Hopkins University "Great Ideas". Retrieved from http://www.jhu.edu/news/podcasts/mp3/ctyfinal0625.mp3

Year 2022, Volume 9, Issue 3, 299 - 311, 30.09.2022

Abstract

References

  • Ablard, K. E. (1997). Self‐perceptions and needs as a function of type of academic ability and gender. Roeper Review, 20(2), 110-115.
  • Ablard, K. E., & Mills, C. J. (1996). Implicit theories of intelligence and self-perceptions of academically talented adolescents and children. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 25(2), 137-148.
  • Ablard, K. E., & Parker, W. D. (1997). Parents' achievement goals and perfectionism in their academically talented children. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 26(6), 651-667.
  • Ablard, K. E. (2002). Achievement goals and implicit theories of intelligence among academically talented students. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 25(3), 215-232.
  • Bain, S. K. (2008). Flanagan, DP, & Harrison, PL (Eds.).(2005). Contemporary Intellectual Assessment—Theories, Tests, and Issues New York: Guilford Press.
  • Bandura, A. (1986). Social foundations of thought and action. Englewood Cliffs, NJ.
  • Bandura, A. (1989). Social cognitive theory. In R. Vasta (Ed.), Annals of child development (Vol. 6, pp. 1-60). Greenwich, CT: JAI Press.
  • Blackburn, C. C., & Brody, L. E. (1994). Family background characteristics of students who reason extremely well mathematically and/or verbally. In Talent development (Vol. 2, pp. 439-444). Dayton, OH: Ohio Psychology Press.
  • Bowlby, J. (1973).Attachment and loss: Separation, anxiety, and anger. New York: Basic Books.
  • Bowlby, J. (1980).Attachment and loss: Vol. 3. Loss: Sadness and depression. New York: Basic Books.
  • Bowlby, J. (1982).Attachment and loss: Attachment(rev. ed.). New York: Basic Books. (Original work published 1969).
  • Bowlby, J. (1988). A secure base. New York: Basic Books.
  • Brody, L. E., Barnett, L. B., & Mills, C. J. (1994). Gender differences among talented adolescents. In Competence and responsibility. The Third European Conference of the European Council for High Ability (pp. 204-210).
  • Brody, L. E., & Reis, S. M. (Eds.). (2004). Grouping and acceleration practices in gifted education. Corwin Press.
  • Campbell, R. J., Muijs, R. D., Neelands, J. G. A., Robinson, W., Eyre, D., & Hewston, R. (2007). The social origins of students identified as gifted and talented in England: a geodemographic analysis. Oxford Review of Education, 33(1), 103-120.
  • Chao, R. K. (1994). Beyond parental control and authoritarian parenting style: Understanding Chinese parenting through the cultural notion of training. Child development, 65(4), 1111-1119.
  • Chiang, M. C., Barysheva, M., Shattuck, D. W., Lee, A. D., Madsen, S. K., Avedissian, C., & Wright, M. J. (2009). Genetics of brain fiber architecture and intellectual performance. Journal of Neuroscience, 29(7), 2212-2224.
  • Croft, L. J. (2003). Teachers of the gifted: Gifted teachers. Handbook of gifted education, 3, 558-571.
  • Deary, I. J., Spinath, F. M., & Bates, T. C. (2006). Genetics of intelligence. European Journal of Human Genetics, 14(6), 690.
  • Deary, I. J., Penke, L., & Johnson, W. (2010). The neuroscience of human intelligence differences. Nature reviews neuroscience, 11(3), 201.
  • Dodge, K. A. (2014). A social information processing model of social competence in children. In Cognitive perspectives on children's social and behavioral development (pp. 85-134). Psychology Press.
  • Durden, W. G., Mills, C. J., & Barnett, L. B. (1990). Aspects of gender differentiation in the Johns Hopkins University Center for Talented Youth. Highly talented young women, 166-185.
  • Durden, W. G., & Mills, C. J. (1993). Talent derailed: the education establishment’s assault on ability grouping. Wisconsin Interest, 2(1), 43-50.
  • Dwairy, M. (2004). Parenting styles and mental health of Arab gifted adolescents. Gifted child quarterly, 48(4), 275-286.
  • Fiedler, E. D., Lange, R. E., & Winebrenner, S. (2002). In search of reality: Unraveling the myths about tracking, ability grouping, and the gifted. Roeper Review, 24(3), 108-111.
  • Brody, L., Fox, L. H., & Tobin, D. (1980). Women and the Mathematical Mystique:
  • Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Hyman Blumberg Symposium on Research in Early Childhood Education: Expanded Version of a Symposium of the American Association for the Advancement of Science Entitled 'Women and Mathematics'. Vol. 5. Johns Hopkins University Press.
  • Goldhaber, D. (2000). Theories of human development: Integrative perspectives. McGraw-Hill Humanities, Social Sciences & World Languages.
  • Howes, C., & Hamilton, C. E. (1992). Children's relationships with caregivers: Mothers and child care teachers. Child development, 63(4), 859-866.
  • Howes, C., Matheson, C. C., & Hamilton, C. E. (1994). Maternal, teacher, and child care history correlates of children's relationships with peers. Child development, 65(1), 264-273.
  • Ireson, J., & Hallam, S. (2009). Academic self-concepts in adolescence: Relations with achievement and ability grouping in schools. Learning and Instruction, 19(3), 201-213.
  • Klahr, D. (1989). Information-processing approaches. Annals of child development, 6, 133-185.
  • Kreppner, K., & Ullrich, M. (1998). Talk to mom and dad, and listen to what is in between: A differential approach to family communication and its impact on adolescent development. In Verbal interaction and development in families with adolescents (pp. 83-108). Ablex.
  • Kulik, J. A. (1992). An Analysis of the Research on Ability Grouping: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives. Research-Based Decision Making Series.
  • Loveless, T. (1998). The Tracking and Ability Grouping Debate. Volume 2, Number 8.
  • Lubinski, D., & Benbow, C. P. (1992). Gender differences in abilities and preferences among the gifted: Implications for the math-science pipeline. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 1(2), 61-66.
  • McCrae, R. R., Costa Jr, P. T., Terracciano, A., Parker, W. D., Mills, C. J., De Fruyt, F., & Mervielde, I. (2002). Personality trait development from age 12 to age 18: Longitudinal, cross-sectional and cross-cultural analyses. Journal of personality and social psychology, 83(6), 1456.
  • Mills, C. J., & Bohannon, W. E. (1980). Personality characteristics of effective state police officers. Journal of Applied Psychology, 65(6), 680.
  • Mills, C. J. (1981). Sex roles, personality, and intellectual abilities in adolescents. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 10(2), 85-112.
  • Mills, C. J. (1983). Personality characteristics of gifted adolescents and their parents: Comparisons and implications for achievement and counseling.
  • Mills, C. J., & Tangherlini, A. E. (1991). Finding the optimal match: Another look at ability grouping and cooperative learning. Equity & Excellence in Education, 25(2-4), 205-208.
  • Mills, C. J., & Durden, W. G. (1992). Cooperative learning and ability grouping: An issue of choice. Gifted Child Quarterly, 36(1), 11-16.
  • Mills, C. J. (1993). Personality, learning style and cognitive style profiles of mathematically talented students. European Journal of High Ability, 4(1), 70-85.
  • Mills, C. J., Moore, N. D., & Parker, W. D. (1996). Psychological type and cognitive style in elementary-age gifted students: Comparisons across age and gender. Journal of Psychological Type, 38, 13-23.
  • Mills, C. J., Ablard, K. E., & Stumpf, H. (1993). Gender differences in academically talented young students' mathematical reasoning: Patterns across age and subskills. Journal of Educational Psychology, 85(2), 340-346.
  • Mills, C. J., & Parker, W. D. (1998). Cognitive-psychological profiles of gifted adolescents from Ireland and the US: Cross-societal comparisons. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 22(1), 1-16.
  • Nelson, K. (1993). Events, narratives, memory: What develops. In Memory and affect in development. The minnesota symposia on child psychology (Vol. 26, pp. 1-24). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.
  • Oakland, T., Joyce, D., Horton, C., & Glutting, J. (2000). Temperament-based learning styles of identified gifted and nongifted students. Gifted Child Quarterly, 44(3), 183-189.
  • Parker, W. D., & Adkins, K. K. (1995). Perfectionism and the gifted. Roeper review, 17(3), 173-175.
  • Parker, W. D. (1998). Birth-order effects in the academically talented. Gifted Child Quarterly, 42(1), 29-38.
  • Parker, W. D., & Stumpf, H. (1998). A validation of the five-factor model of personality in academically talented youth across observers and instruments. Personality and Individual Differences, 25(6), 1005-1025.
  • Pianta, R. C. (1992). Conceptual and Methodological Issues in Research on Relationships between Children and Nonparental Adults. New directions for child development, 57, 121-29.
  • Preckel, F., Götz, T., & Frenzel, A. (2010). Ability grouping of gifted students: Effects on academic self‐concept and boredom. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 80(3), 451-472.
  • Robinson, J. P. (2008). Evidence of a differential effect of ability grouping on the reading achievement growth of language-minority Hispanics. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 30(2), 141-180.
  • Rogers, K. B. (2002). Re-forming gifted education: Matching the program to the child. Great Potential Press, Inc.
  • Rogers, K. B. (2006). A menu of options for grouping gifted students. Prufrock Press Inc.
  • Runco, M. A., & Okuda, S. M. (1993). Reaching creatively gifted children through their learning styles. Teaching and counseling gifted and talented adolescents: An international learning style perspective, 103-115.
  • Steinberg, L., Darling, N. E., Fletcher, A. C., Brown, B. B., & Dornbusch, S. M. (1995).
  • Authoritative parenting and adolescent adjustment: An ecological journey. Examining lives in context: Perspectives on the ecology of human development, 63, 2-3.
  • Sternberg, R. J., & Clinkenbeard, P. R. (1995). The triarchic model applied to identifying, teaching, and assessing gifted children.
  • Sternberg, R. J., & Zhang, L. F. (1995). What do we mean by giftedness? A pentagonal implicit theory. Gifted Child Quarterly, 39(2), 88-94.
  • Stumpf, H. (1995). Gender differences in performance on tests of cognitive abilities: Experimental design issues and empirical results. Learning and Individual Differences, 7(4), 275-287.
  • Tieso, C. L. (2003). Ability grouping is not just tracking anymore. Roeper Review, 26(1), 29-36.
  • Toga, A. W., & Thompson, P. M. (2005). Genetics of brain structure and intelligence. Annu. Rev. Neurosci., 28, 1-23.
  • Tsui, J. M., & Mazzocco, M. M. (2007). Mathematics and perfectionism: Effects of math anxiety and perfectionism on timed versus untimed math testing in mathematically gifted sixth graders. Roeper Review, 29(2), 132-139.
  • Van Ijzendoorn, M. H., & Tavecchio, L. W. (1987). The development of attachment theory as a Lakatosian research program: Philosophical and methodological aspects. In Advances in Psychology (Vol. 44, pp. 3-31). North-Holland.
  • Waters, E., Merrick, S., Treboux, D., Crowell, J., & Albersheim, L. (2000). Attachment security in infancy and early adulthood: A twenty‐year longitudinal study. Child development, 71(3), 684-689.
  • Ybarra, L. (Producer). (2009, June). Center for talented youth [Audio Podcast]. Johns Hopkins University "Great Ideas". Retrieved from http://www.jhu.edu/news/podcasts/mp3/ctyfinal0625.mp3

Details

Primary Language English
Subjects Education, Special
Journal Section Identification and Test Development
Authors

Justin PETKUS> (Primary Author)
University of Luxembourg
0000-0002-3179-1904
Luxembourg

Publication Date September 30, 2022
Published in Issue Year 2022, Volume 9, Issue 3

Cite

APA Petkus, J. (2022). The theoretical roots of gifted and talented youth education programs: The CTY case example . Journal of Gifted Education and Creativity , 9 (3) , 299-311 . Retrieved from https://dergipark.org.tr/en/pub/jgedc/issue/71264/1167514

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