Research Article
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Year 2016, Volume 3, Issue 2, 1 - 15, 01.08.2016
https://doi.org/10.17275/per.16.06.3.2

Abstract

References

  • Bergmann, J. and A. Sams (2012). Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day. New York, ISTE & ASTD.
  • Bonk, C. J. and E. Khoo (2014). Adding some TEC-variety: 100+ activities for motivating and retaining learners online. Bloomington, Indiana, Open World Books.
  • Bonk, C. J. and K. Zhang (2008). Empowering online learning: 100+ Activities for reading, reflecting, displaying, & doing. San Francisco, Jossey-Bass.
  • Deimann, M. and J. M. Keller (2006). "Volitional aspects of multimedia learning." Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia 15(2): 137-158.
  • Eitington, J. E. (2001). The winning trainer. New York, Routledge.
  • Joyce, B. and M. Weil (1980). Models of Teaching. Englewood Cliffs, NJ, Prentice-Hall, Inc.
  • Keller, J. M. (1979). "Motivation and instructional design: A theoretical perspective." Journal of Instructional Development 2(4): 26 - 34.
  • Keller, J. M. (1983). Motivational design of instruction. Instructional design theories and models: An overview of their current status. C. M. Reigeluth. Hillsdale, NJ, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  • Keller, J. M. (1984). The use of the ARCS model of motivation in teacher training. Aspects of Educational Technology Volume XVII: Staff Development and Career Updating. K. S. A. J. Trott. London, Kogan Page.
  • Keller, J. M. (1987). "Strategies for stimulating the motivation to learn." Performance & Instruction 26(8): 1 - 7.
  • Keller, J. M. (1987). "The systematic process of motivational design." Performance & Instruction 26(9): 1 - 8.
  • Keller, J. M. (2008). "An integrative theory of motivation, volition, and performance." Technology, Instruction, Cognition, and Learning 6(2): 79-104.
  • Keller, J. M. (2010). Motivational design for learning and performance: The ARCS model approach. New York, Springer.
  • Kuhl, J. (1987). Action control: The maintenance of motivational states. Motivation, Intention and Volition. F. Halisch and J. Kuhl. Berlin, Springer: 279-291.
  • Suzuki, K. and J. M. Keller (1996). Creation and cultural validation of an ARCS motivational design matrix. Annual meeting of the Japanese Association for Educational Technology, Kanazawa, Japan.
  • Visser, L. (1998). The Development of Motivational Communication in Distance Education Support, Educational Technology Department, The University of Twente, The Netherlands.
  • Wheelwright, P. (1951). Aristotle. New York, The Odyssey Press.
  • Zimmerman, B. J. (2001). Theories of Self-Regulated Learning and Academic Achievement: An Overview and Analysis. Self-Regulated Learning and Academic Achievement. Theoretical Perspectives. B. J. Zimmerman and D. H. Schunk. Mahwah, N.J., Erlbaum: 1-38.

Motivation, Learning, and Technology: Applying the ARCS-V Motivation Model

Year 2016, Volume 3, Issue 2, 1 - 15, 01.08.2016
https://doi.org/10.17275/per.16.06.3.2

Abstract

The ARCS-V model (an acronym for attention, relevance, confidence, satisfaction, and volition) contains a synthesis of motivational and volitional concepts and theories that provide a foundation for a motivational design process that has been validated in many contexts (Keller 2010). This paper begins with a listing of many of the technology applications and delivery system options that are now available to instructional designers and teachers, but then goes on to describe learner motivation challenges that still occur despite these innovations. Part 2, the major part of the paper, describes the ARCS-V motivational synthesis and how to apply it to identify motivational characteristics and problems of learners together with a systematic process for designing and implementing motivational solutions. This design approach includes a 10-step process as well as a simplified version of the process to aid in lesson and module planning. It also includes a self-reflective checklist that an instructor can use to identify which aspects of motivation are satisfactory and which require strengthening. The final part of the paper provides examples of motivational strategies and a case description of the motivational enhancement of an instructional module in three different delivery contexts: classroom instruction, blended learning, and eLearning.

References

  • Bergmann, J. and A. Sams (2012). Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day. New York, ISTE & ASTD.
  • Bonk, C. J. and E. Khoo (2014). Adding some TEC-variety: 100+ activities for motivating and retaining learners online. Bloomington, Indiana, Open World Books.
  • Bonk, C. J. and K. Zhang (2008). Empowering online learning: 100+ Activities for reading, reflecting, displaying, & doing. San Francisco, Jossey-Bass.
  • Deimann, M. and J. M. Keller (2006). "Volitional aspects of multimedia learning." Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia 15(2): 137-158.
  • Eitington, J. E. (2001). The winning trainer. New York, Routledge.
  • Joyce, B. and M. Weil (1980). Models of Teaching. Englewood Cliffs, NJ, Prentice-Hall, Inc.
  • Keller, J. M. (1979). "Motivation and instructional design: A theoretical perspective." Journal of Instructional Development 2(4): 26 - 34.
  • Keller, J. M. (1983). Motivational design of instruction. Instructional design theories and models: An overview of their current status. C. M. Reigeluth. Hillsdale, NJ, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  • Keller, J. M. (1984). The use of the ARCS model of motivation in teacher training. Aspects of Educational Technology Volume XVII: Staff Development and Career Updating. K. S. A. J. Trott. London, Kogan Page.
  • Keller, J. M. (1987). "Strategies for stimulating the motivation to learn." Performance & Instruction 26(8): 1 - 7.
  • Keller, J. M. (1987). "The systematic process of motivational design." Performance & Instruction 26(9): 1 - 8.
  • Keller, J. M. (2008). "An integrative theory of motivation, volition, and performance." Technology, Instruction, Cognition, and Learning 6(2): 79-104.
  • Keller, J. M. (2010). Motivational design for learning and performance: The ARCS model approach. New York, Springer.
  • Kuhl, J. (1987). Action control: The maintenance of motivational states. Motivation, Intention and Volition. F. Halisch and J. Kuhl. Berlin, Springer: 279-291.
  • Suzuki, K. and J. M. Keller (1996). Creation and cultural validation of an ARCS motivational design matrix. Annual meeting of the Japanese Association for Educational Technology, Kanazawa, Japan.
  • Visser, L. (1998). The Development of Motivational Communication in Distance Education Support, Educational Technology Department, The University of Twente, The Netherlands.
  • Wheelwright, P. (1951). Aristotle. New York, The Odyssey Press.
  • Zimmerman, B. J. (2001). Theories of Self-Regulated Learning and Academic Achievement: An Overview and Analysis. Self-Regulated Learning and Academic Achievement. Theoretical Perspectives. B. J. Zimmerman and D. H. Schunk. Mahwah, N.J., Erlbaum: 1-38.

Details

Primary Language English
Subjects Education, Scientific Disciplines
Journal Section Research Articles
Authors

John M. KELLER

Publication Date August 1, 2016
Published in Issue Year 2016, Volume 3, Issue 2

Cite

APA Keller, J. M. (2016). Motivation, Learning, and Technology: Applying the ARCS-V Motivation Model . Participatory Educational Research , 3 (2) , 1-15 . DOI: 10.17275/per.16.06.3.2