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Year 2020, Volume 10, Issue 1, 2 - 20, 27.06.2020
https://doi.org/10.46893/talent.757477

Abstract

References

  • Amabile, T. (1983). The social psychology of creativity. New York: Springer Verlag.
  • Ambrose, D. (2000). World-view entrapment: Moral-ethical implications for gifted education. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 23(2), 159-186.
  • Aspinwall, L. G., & Brunhart, S. M. (2000). What I do know won't hurt me: Optimism, attention to negative information, coping, and health. In J. E. Gillham (Ed.), Laws of life symposia series. The science of optimism and hope: Research essays in honor of Martin E. P. Seligman (p. 163–200). Philadelphia: Templeton Foundation Press.
  • Aspinwall, L.G., & Richter, L. (1999). Optimism and self-mastery predict more rapid disengagement from unsolvable tasks in the presence of alternatives. Motivation and Emotion, 23(3), 221-245.
  • Battistich, B., Watson, M., Solomon, D., Schaps, E., & Solomon, J. (1991). The child development project: Program for the development of prosocial character. In W. Kurtines and J. Gewirtz (Eds.), Handbook of moral behavior and development, Volume 3: Application (pp. 1-34). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Barns, H. (1979). History teaching – dramatic art. In E. Piening & N. Lyons (Eds.), Education as an art. New York: The Rudolf Steiner School Press.
  • Baum, S. M., Olenchak, F. R., & Owen S. V. (1998). Gifted students with attention deficits: Fact and/or fiction? Or, can we see the forest for the trees? Gifted Child Quarterly, 42(2), 96-104.
  • Berman S. (1997). Children's social consciousness and the development of social responsibility. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.
  • Bronfenbrenner, U. (1979). The ecology of human development. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
  • Chang, E.C. (Ed.). (2001). Optimism and pessimism: Implications for theory, research, and practice. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
  • Chlopan, B. E., McCain, M. L. Caronell, J. L. & Hagen, R. L. (1985). Empathy: Review of available measures. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 48, 3 635-653.
  • Csikszentmilhalyi, M. (1990). Flow: The psychology of optimal experience. New York: HarperCollins.
  • Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1996). Creativity: Glow and the psychology of discovery and invention. New York: HarperCollins.
  • Dabrowski, K., & Piechowski, M. M. (1977). Theory of levels of emotional development (Vol. 1 & 2). Oceanside, NY: Dabor Science.
  • Danish, S. J. & Kagan, N. (1971). Measurement of affective sensitivity: Toward a valid measure of interpersonal perception. The Journal of Counseling Psychology, 18(1) 51-54.
  • de Tocqueville, A. (1945). Democracy in America (Vol. 2). New York: Alfred A Knopf.
  • Eisenberg, N., & Miller, P. A. (1987). The relation of empathy to prosocial and related behaviors. Psychological Bulletin, 101(1), 91-119.
  • Eisenberg-Berg, N. (1979). Development of children’s prosocial moral judgment. Developmental Psychology, 15(2), 128-137.
  • Eliot, C. W. (Ed) (1909). The Harvard classics, New York: Collier & Son.
  • Erikson, E. H. (1964). Insight and responsibility: Lectures on the ethical implications of psychoanalytic insight. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, Inc.
  • Feshback, N. D., & Hoffman. M. L. (1978, April). Sex differences in children’s reports of emotion-arousing situations. Paper presented in D. McGuiness (chair), Symposium at Western Psychological Association meetings, San Francisco.
  • Fowler, D. (1990). Democracy’s next generation. Educational Leadership, 48(3), 10-15.
  • Fredrickson, B. (2000, March 7). Cultivating positive emotions to optimize health and well-being. Prevention and Treatment [On-line], 1-26. Available: http://journals.apa.org/prevention/volume3/pre0030001a.html
  • Friedman, H. S. (1980). Understanding and assessing nonverbal expressiveness: The affective communication test. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 39(2), 333-351.
  • Gagné, F. (1985). Giftedness and talent: Reexamining a reexamination of the definitions. Gifted Child Quarterly, 29, 103-112.
  • Gardner, H. (1983). Frames of mind: The theory of multiple intelligences. New York: Basic Books.
  • Gelb, M. J. (1998). How to think like Leonardo da Vince. New York: Delacorte Press.
  • George, P. G., & Scheft, T. (1998). Children’s thoughts about the future: Comparing gifted and nongifted students after 20 years. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 21(2), 224-239.
  • Gottfried, A. E. (1982). Children’s academic intrinsic motivation inventory. Princeton, NJ: Educational Testing Service.
  • Gove. F. L. & Keating, D. P. (1979). Empathic role-taking precursors. Developmental Psychology, 15 (6) 594-600.
  • Hart Research Associates (1989). Democracy’s next generation: A study of youth and teachers. Washington DC: People for the American Way.
  • John-Steiner, V. (1997). Notebooks of the mind: Explorations of thinking. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Kaufman, F. (2000). Gifted education and romance of passion. Communicator 31(3), 1.
  • Kogan, M. (2000). Teaching truth, beauty, and goodness. [An interview with Howard Gardner]. Monitor on Psychology, 31(12), 66-67.
  • Kreitler, S., Kreitler, H., & Zigler, E. (1974). Cognitive orientation and curiosity. British Journal of Psychology, 65, 43-52.
  • LaBonte, R. (1999). Social capital and community development: Practitioner emptor. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 23(4), 430-433.
  • Larson, R. W. (2000). Toward a psychology of positive youth development. American Psychologist, 15(1), 170-183.
  • Lindholm, C. (1990). Charisma. Cambridge, MA: Basil Blackwell.
  • MacKinnon, D. W. (1978). In search of human effectiveness. Buffalo, NY: Creative Education Foundation, Inc.
  • Maslow, A. (1954). Motivation and personality. New York: Harper.
  • Mehrabian, A., & Epstein, N. (1972). A measure of emotional empathy. The Journal of Personality, 40(4), 525-543.
  • Mönks, F. J. (1991). Kann wissenschaftliche argumentation auf aktulität verzichten? (Are scientific arguments dispensable in the discussion on identification of the gifted?) Zeitschrift für Entwicklungspsychologie und Pädagogische Psychologie, 23, 232-240.
  • Moon, S. M. (2000, May). Personal talent: What is it and how can we study it? Paper presented at the Fifth Biennial Henry B. and Joycelyn Wallace National Research Symposium on Talent Development, Iowa City, IA.
  • Naylor, F. D. (1981). Melbourne curiosity inventory. Australian Psychologist, 16(2), 172-183.
  • Padhee, B., & Das, S. (1987). Reliability of an adapted curiosity scale. Social Science International 3(2), 27-30.
  • Peterson, C. (2000). The future of optimism. American Psychologist, 55(1), 44-55.
  • Portes, A. (1998). Social capital: Its origins and applications in modern sociology. Annual Review of Sociology, 24, 1-24. Putman, D. (1997). Psychological Courage. Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology, 4(1), 1-11.
  • Putnam, R. (1993). Making democracy work: Civic traditions in modern Italy. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  • Putnam, R. (1995). Bowling alone: America's declining social capital. Journal of Democracy, 6(1), 65-78.
  • Rea, D. W. (2000). Optimal motivation for talent development. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 23(2), 187-216.
  • Reis, S.M. (1995). Older women’s reflections on eminence: Obstacles and opportunities. Roeper Review, 18(1), 66-72.
  • Reis, S.M. (1998). Work left undone: Choices and compromises of talented females. Mansfield Center, CT: Creative Learning Press, Inc.
  • Renzulli, J. S. (1977). The Enrichment Triad Model: A guide for developing defensible programs for the gifted and talented. Mansfield Center, CT: Creative Learning Press.
  • Renzulli, J. S. (1978). What makes giftedness? Re-examining a definition. Phi Delta Kappan, 60, 180-184.
  • Rotter, J. B. (1966). Generalized expectancies for internal versus external control of reinforcement. Psychological Monographs, 81(1), 1-28.
  • Ryan, R. M. & Deci, E. L. (2000). Self-determination theory and the facilitation of intrinsic motivation, social development, and well-being. American Psychologist, 55, 1, 68-78.
  • Scheier, M. F., & Carver, C. S. (1985). Optimism, coping, and health: Assessment and implications of generalized outcome expectancies. Health Psychology, 4, 219-247.
  • Schwartz, B. (2000). Self-determination: The tyranny of freedom. American Psychologist, 55(1), 79-88.
  • Seligman, M. E. P. (1991). Learned optimism. New York: Knopf.
  • Seligman, M. E. P, & Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2000). Positive psychology. American Psychologist, 55(1), 5-14.
  • Seligman, M.E.P., Reivich, K., Jaycox, L., & Gillham, J. (1995). The optimistic child. New York: Houghton Mifflin.
  • Silverman, L., Roeper, A., & Smith, G. (2000, November). A child shall lead them: Children for nonviolence. Paper presented at the meeting of the National Association of Gifted Children, Atlanta, GA.
  • Sternberg, R. J. & Davidson, J. E. (1986). Conceptions of giftedness. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Stipek, D. J., Lamb, M. E., & Zigler, E. F. (1981). OPTI: A measure of children’s optimism. Educational Psychological Measurement, 41, 131-143.
  • Tannenbaum, A. J. (1986). Giftedness: A psychosocial approach. In R.J. Sternberg & J.E. Davidson (Eds.), Conceptions of giftedness. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Tiger, L. (1979). Optimism: The biology of hope. New York: Simon & Schuster.
  • Times Mirror Center for the People and the Press (1990). The age of Indifference: A study of young Americans and how they view the news. Washington DC: Author.
  • Underwood, B., & Moore, B (1982). Perspective-taking and altruism. Psychological Bulletin, 91, 143-173.
  • Wicker, F. W., Lambert, F. B., Richardson, F. C., & Kahler, J. (1984). Categorical goal hierarchies and classification of the human motives. Journal of Personality, 52(3), 285-305.
  • Williams, J. (1998). Self-concept –performance congruence: An exploration of patterns among high-achieving adolescents. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 21(4), 415-422.
  • Wong, M. M., & Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1991). Motivation and academic achievement: The effects of personality traits and the quality of experience. Journal of Personality, 59(3), 539-574.
  • Zahn-Waxler, C., & Radke-Yarrow, M. (1982). The development of altruism: alternative research strategies. In N. Eisenberg-Berg (Ed.), The development of prosocial behavior (pp. 109-37). New York: Academic.

Promoting Social Capital by Expanding the Conception of Giftedness

Year 2020, Volume 10, Issue 1, 2 - 20, 27.06.2020
https://doi.org/10.46893/talent.757477

Abstract

After repeatedly observing the little boy crying on the school bus, Melanie, a fifth grade student, took a seat next to him and struck up a conversation. “You don’t understand,” said Tony, a first grader whose face was practical-ly hidden behind the thickest eyeglasses Melanie had ever seen. “You see these glasses? I’m partially sighted. The kids trip me and make fun of me; I have special books for my subjects, but there are no books in the library that I can read. ”Later that day Melanie approached her enrichment teacher and asked if she could make Tony her “Type III” Project [Type III Enrichment in The Enrichment Triad Model (Renzulli, 1977, p.22) is a self-selected individual or small group investigation of a real problem] for the year. Over the next several days, Melanie and the enrichment teacher drew up a plan that began with some “friendly persuasion” for the boys that were harassing Tony. A few of the school’s bigger, well-respected boys and girls escorted him from the school bus and sat with him in the lunchroom. Melanie then asked Tony a series of questions from an instrument called the Interest-A-Lyzer to determine what some of his reading interests might be. She recruited a number of the school’s best writers to work on large print "big books” that dealt with Tony’s interests in sports and adventure stories. She also recruited the school’s best artists to illustrate the books, and served as the editor and production manager for the series. As the project progressed over the next several months, a remarkable change took place in Tony’s attitude toward school. He became a local celebrity, and other students even signed out books from Tony’s special section of the library. Melanie’s crea-tive idea and her task commitment resulted in the development of pro-found empathy and sensitivity to human concerns and the application of her talents to an unselfish cause. When questioned about her work, Melanie explained simply, “It didn’t change the world, but it changed the world of one little boy.”

References

  • Amabile, T. (1983). The social psychology of creativity. New York: Springer Verlag.
  • Ambrose, D. (2000). World-view entrapment: Moral-ethical implications for gifted education. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 23(2), 159-186.
  • Aspinwall, L. G., & Brunhart, S. M. (2000). What I do know won't hurt me: Optimism, attention to negative information, coping, and health. In J. E. Gillham (Ed.), Laws of life symposia series. The science of optimism and hope: Research essays in honor of Martin E. P. Seligman (p. 163–200). Philadelphia: Templeton Foundation Press.
  • Aspinwall, L.G., & Richter, L. (1999). Optimism and self-mastery predict more rapid disengagement from unsolvable tasks in the presence of alternatives. Motivation and Emotion, 23(3), 221-245.
  • Battistich, B., Watson, M., Solomon, D., Schaps, E., & Solomon, J. (1991). The child development project: Program for the development of prosocial character. In W. Kurtines and J. Gewirtz (Eds.), Handbook of moral behavior and development, Volume 3: Application (pp. 1-34). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Barns, H. (1979). History teaching – dramatic art. In E. Piening & N. Lyons (Eds.), Education as an art. New York: The Rudolf Steiner School Press.
  • Baum, S. M., Olenchak, F. R., & Owen S. V. (1998). Gifted students with attention deficits: Fact and/or fiction? Or, can we see the forest for the trees? Gifted Child Quarterly, 42(2), 96-104.
  • Berman S. (1997). Children's social consciousness and the development of social responsibility. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.
  • Bronfenbrenner, U. (1979). The ecology of human development. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
  • Chang, E.C. (Ed.). (2001). Optimism and pessimism: Implications for theory, research, and practice. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
  • Chlopan, B. E., McCain, M. L. Caronell, J. L. & Hagen, R. L. (1985). Empathy: Review of available measures. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 48, 3 635-653.
  • Csikszentmilhalyi, M. (1990). Flow: The psychology of optimal experience. New York: HarperCollins.
  • Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1996). Creativity: Glow and the psychology of discovery and invention. New York: HarperCollins.
  • Dabrowski, K., & Piechowski, M. M. (1977). Theory of levels of emotional development (Vol. 1 & 2). Oceanside, NY: Dabor Science.
  • Danish, S. J. & Kagan, N. (1971). Measurement of affective sensitivity: Toward a valid measure of interpersonal perception. The Journal of Counseling Psychology, 18(1) 51-54.
  • de Tocqueville, A. (1945). Democracy in America (Vol. 2). New York: Alfred A Knopf.
  • Eisenberg, N., & Miller, P. A. (1987). The relation of empathy to prosocial and related behaviors. Psychological Bulletin, 101(1), 91-119.
  • Eisenberg-Berg, N. (1979). Development of children’s prosocial moral judgment. Developmental Psychology, 15(2), 128-137.
  • Eliot, C. W. (Ed) (1909). The Harvard classics, New York: Collier & Son.
  • Erikson, E. H. (1964). Insight and responsibility: Lectures on the ethical implications of psychoanalytic insight. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, Inc.
  • Feshback, N. D., & Hoffman. M. L. (1978, April). Sex differences in children’s reports of emotion-arousing situations. Paper presented in D. McGuiness (chair), Symposium at Western Psychological Association meetings, San Francisco.
  • Fowler, D. (1990). Democracy’s next generation. Educational Leadership, 48(3), 10-15.
  • Fredrickson, B. (2000, March 7). Cultivating positive emotions to optimize health and well-being. Prevention and Treatment [On-line], 1-26. Available: http://journals.apa.org/prevention/volume3/pre0030001a.html
  • Friedman, H. S. (1980). Understanding and assessing nonverbal expressiveness: The affective communication test. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 39(2), 333-351.
  • Gagné, F. (1985). Giftedness and talent: Reexamining a reexamination of the definitions. Gifted Child Quarterly, 29, 103-112.
  • Gardner, H. (1983). Frames of mind: The theory of multiple intelligences. New York: Basic Books.
  • Gelb, M. J. (1998). How to think like Leonardo da Vince. New York: Delacorte Press.
  • George, P. G., & Scheft, T. (1998). Children’s thoughts about the future: Comparing gifted and nongifted students after 20 years. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 21(2), 224-239.
  • Gottfried, A. E. (1982). Children’s academic intrinsic motivation inventory. Princeton, NJ: Educational Testing Service.
  • Gove. F. L. & Keating, D. P. (1979). Empathic role-taking precursors. Developmental Psychology, 15 (6) 594-600.
  • Hart Research Associates (1989). Democracy’s next generation: A study of youth and teachers. Washington DC: People for the American Way.
  • John-Steiner, V. (1997). Notebooks of the mind: Explorations of thinking. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Kaufman, F. (2000). Gifted education and romance of passion. Communicator 31(3), 1.
  • Kogan, M. (2000). Teaching truth, beauty, and goodness. [An interview with Howard Gardner]. Monitor on Psychology, 31(12), 66-67.
  • Kreitler, S., Kreitler, H., & Zigler, E. (1974). Cognitive orientation and curiosity. British Journal of Psychology, 65, 43-52.
  • LaBonte, R. (1999). Social capital and community development: Practitioner emptor. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 23(4), 430-433.
  • Larson, R. W. (2000). Toward a psychology of positive youth development. American Psychologist, 15(1), 170-183.
  • Lindholm, C. (1990). Charisma. Cambridge, MA: Basil Blackwell.
  • MacKinnon, D. W. (1978). In search of human effectiveness. Buffalo, NY: Creative Education Foundation, Inc.
  • Maslow, A. (1954). Motivation and personality. New York: Harper.
  • Mehrabian, A., & Epstein, N. (1972). A measure of emotional empathy. The Journal of Personality, 40(4), 525-543.
  • Mönks, F. J. (1991). Kann wissenschaftliche argumentation auf aktulität verzichten? (Are scientific arguments dispensable in the discussion on identification of the gifted?) Zeitschrift für Entwicklungspsychologie und Pädagogische Psychologie, 23, 232-240.
  • Moon, S. M. (2000, May). Personal talent: What is it and how can we study it? Paper presented at the Fifth Biennial Henry B. and Joycelyn Wallace National Research Symposium on Talent Development, Iowa City, IA.
  • Naylor, F. D. (1981). Melbourne curiosity inventory. Australian Psychologist, 16(2), 172-183.
  • Padhee, B., & Das, S. (1987). Reliability of an adapted curiosity scale. Social Science International 3(2), 27-30.
  • Peterson, C. (2000). The future of optimism. American Psychologist, 55(1), 44-55.
  • Portes, A. (1998). Social capital: Its origins and applications in modern sociology. Annual Review of Sociology, 24, 1-24. Putman, D. (1997). Psychological Courage. Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology, 4(1), 1-11.
  • Putnam, R. (1993). Making democracy work: Civic traditions in modern Italy. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  • Putnam, R. (1995). Bowling alone: America's declining social capital. Journal of Democracy, 6(1), 65-78.
  • Rea, D. W. (2000). Optimal motivation for talent development. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 23(2), 187-216.
  • Reis, S.M. (1995). Older women’s reflections on eminence: Obstacles and opportunities. Roeper Review, 18(1), 66-72.
  • Reis, S.M. (1998). Work left undone: Choices and compromises of talented females. Mansfield Center, CT: Creative Learning Press, Inc.
  • Renzulli, J. S. (1977). The Enrichment Triad Model: A guide for developing defensible programs for the gifted and talented. Mansfield Center, CT: Creative Learning Press.
  • Renzulli, J. S. (1978). What makes giftedness? Re-examining a definition. Phi Delta Kappan, 60, 180-184.
  • Rotter, J. B. (1966). Generalized expectancies for internal versus external control of reinforcement. Psychological Monographs, 81(1), 1-28.
  • Ryan, R. M. & Deci, E. L. (2000). Self-determination theory and the facilitation of intrinsic motivation, social development, and well-being. American Psychologist, 55, 1, 68-78.
  • Scheier, M. F., & Carver, C. S. (1985). Optimism, coping, and health: Assessment and implications of generalized outcome expectancies. Health Psychology, 4, 219-247.
  • Schwartz, B. (2000). Self-determination: The tyranny of freedom. American Psychologist, 55(1), 79-88.
  • Seligman, M. E. P. (1991). Learned optimism. New York: Knopf.
  • Seligman, M. E. P, & Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2000). Positive psychology. American Psychologist, 55(1), 5-14.
  • Seligman, M.E.P., Reivich, K., Jaycox, L., & Gillham, J. (1995). The optimistic child. New York: Houghton Mifflin.
  • Silverman, L., Roeper, A., & Smith, G. (2000, November). A child shall lead them: Children for nonviolence. Paper presented at the meeting of the National Association of Gifted Children, Atlanta, GA.
  • Sternberg, R. J. & Davidson, J. E. (1986). Conceptions of giftedness. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Stipek, D. J., Lamb, M. E., & Zigler, E. F. (1981). OPTI: A measure of children’s optimism. Educational Psychological Measurement, 41, 131-143.
  • Tannenbaum, A. J. (1986). Giftedness: A psychosocial approach. In R.J. Sternberg & J.E. Davidson (Eds.), Conceptions of giftedness. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Tiger, L. (1979). Optimism: The biology of hope. New York: Simon & Schuster.
  • Times Mirror Center for the People and the Press (1990). The age of Indifference: A study of young Americans and how they view the news. Washington DC: Author.
  • Underwood, B., & Moore, B (1982). Perspective-taking and altruism. Psychological Bulletin, 91, 143-173.
  • Wicker, F. W., Lambert, F. B., Richardson, F. C., & Kahler, J. (1984). Categorical goal hierarchies and classification of the human motives. Journal of Personality, 52(3), 285-305.
  • Williams, J. (1998). Self-concept –performance congruence: An exploration of patterns among high-achieving adolescents. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 21(4), 415-422.
  • Wong, M. M., & Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1991). Motivation and academic achievement: The effects of personality traits and the quality of experience. Journal of Personality, 59(3), 539-574.
  • Zahn-Waxler, C., & Radke-Yarrow, M. (1982). The development of altruism: alternative research strategies. In N. Eisenberg-Berg (Ed.), The development of prosocial behavior (pp. 109-37). New York: Academic.

Details

Primary Language English
Subjects Education, Special
Journal Section Research Articles
Authors

Joseph RENZULLİ This is me
The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, The Neag School of Education, University of Connecticut
0000-0002-5370-9633
United States

Publication Date June 27, 2020
Application Date June 15, 2020
Acceptance Date June 21, 2020
Published in Issue Year 2020, Volume 10, Issue 1

Cite

APA Renzulli, J. (2020). Promoting Social Capital by Expanding the Conception of Giftedness . Talent , 10 (1) , 2-20 . DOI: 10.46893/talent.757477