Research Article
PDF Mendeley EndNote BibTex Cite

Design, Manufacturing and Testing of a Stirling Engine with Slider-Crank Mechanism

Year 2022, Volume 14, Issue 1, 10 - 23, 31.01.2022
https://doi.org/10.29137/umagd.895498

Abstract

In this study, a beta type Stirling engine with slider-crank mechanism having swept volume of 365 cm3 was designed, manufactured and performances tested. The design phase was first started by determining the operating parameters of the engine. The necessary mathematical calculations were performed by considering the operating conditions of the Stirling engine with a slider-crank mechanism to be manufactured. After determining the engine parameters, the dimensional design phase was started within the tolerance limits of the engine parts. The parts were designed by the computer-aided SolidWorks program in solid modeling and by the AutoCAD program in two-dimensional design and projecting. Each part used in the manufacturing of the Stirling engine was assembled delicately in the assembly process. A prony-type dynamometer, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) fuel, and electronically controlled electric heater systems were developed to perform the performance tests and analyses of the manufactured engine. Experimental studies were conducted at hot end temperatures of 627 °C, 727 °C, and 827 °C and at a cold end temperature of 27 °C by utilizing an electrical heater as a heat source and air as a working fluid. According to the results obtained in experimental studies for different heater temperatures and different charge pressures, it was revealed that engine power values increased depending on the heater temperature and charge pressure increase. The maximum power values at all heater temperatures were acquired at a charge pressure of 4 bar. In this study, the maximum engine power was obtained as 69.5 W at a hot end temperature of 827 °C, at a charge pressure of 4 bar, and at an engine speed of 200 rpm when a stainless-steel displacement piston and air as a working fluid were utilized, and the maximum engine torque value was obtained as 4.21 Nm at a charge pressure of 4 bar and an engine speed of 135 rpm. The lowest engine power among the maximum engine power values obtained in all experimental studies was found as 17.09 W at a hot end temperature of 627 °C, at a pressure of 1 bar, and at an engine speed of 185 rpm. The maximum power values of the engine developed within the scope of this study at hot end temperatures of 627 °C, 727 °C, and 827 °C were determined to be 31.2 W, 48.3 W, and 69.5 W, respectively. Upon examining the results obtained from experimental studies, it is observed that the heater temperature and charge pressure have significant impacts on the performance values of Stirling engines. Within the scope of this study, a new power generation system that could use renewable energy sources was put into operation.

References

  • Brey, H. D., Rinia, H., Weenen, F. L.V. (1947). Fundamentals for the development of the Philips air engine, Philips Technical Review, 9(4):97-104.
  • Çınar, C., Aksoy, F., Erol, D. (2012). The effect of displacer material on the performance of a low temperature differential Stirling engine, International Journal of Energy Research, 36:911-917.
  • Erol, D., Yaman, H. and Doğan, B. (2017). A review development of rhombic drive mechanism used in the Stirling engines. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 78:1044-1067.
  • Finkelstein, T. and Organ, A. J., Air engines the history science and reality of the perfect engine. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers, New York, 2004.
  • Gielen, D., Boshell, F., Saygin, D., Bazilian, M.D. and Wagner, N. (2019). The role of renewable energy in the global energy transformation, Energy Strategy Reviews, 24:38-50.
  • Guelpa, E., Bischi, A., Verda, V., Chertkov, M., Lund, H. (2019). Towards future infrastructures for sustainable multi-energy systems: A review, Energy, 184:2-21.
  • Hansen, K., Mathiesen, B.V., Skov, I. R. (2019). Full energy system transition towards 100% renewable energy in Germany in 2050, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 102:1-13.
  • Krakowski, V., Assoumou, E., Mazauric, V. and Maïzi, N. (2016). Feasible path toward 40–100% renewable energy shares for power supply in France by 2050: A prospective analysis, Applied Energy, 171:501–522.
  • Meijer, R. J. (1965). Philips Stirling engine activities, SAE Technical Paper (No. 650004).
  • Lin, B., Zhu, J. (2019). Determinants of renewable energy technological innovation in China under CO2 emissions constraint, Journal of Environmental Management, 247:662-671.
  • Nathaniel, S. P., Iheonu, C. O. (2019). Carbon dioxide abatement in Africa: The role of renewable and non-renewable energy consumption. Science of The Total Environment, 679:337-345.
  • Organ, A. J., (2014). Stirling cycle engines inner workings and design. John Wiley and Sons, Ltd, (ISBN:9781118818435).
  • Ozcan, M. (2018). The role of renewables in increasing Turkey's self-sufficiency in electrical energy. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 82, 2629-2639.
  • Rinia, H., Pre, F. K. D. (1946). Air engines, Philips Technical Review, 8:129-136.
  • Stirling, R., Stirling Air Engine and The Heat Regenarator, Patent no 4081, 1816.
  • Urieli, I. and Berchowitz, D. M. (1984). Stirling Cycle Engine Analysis. (1. Edition). Bristol: Adam Hilger.
  • Weenen, F. L. V. 1947. “The Construction of the Philips air engine”, Philips Technical Review, 9(5):125-134.

Year 2022, Volume 14, Issue 1, 10 - 23, 31.01.2022
https://doi.org/10.29137/umagd.895498

Abstract

References

  • Brey, H. D., Rinia, H., Weenen, F. L.V. (1947). Fundamentals for the development of the Philips air engine, Philips Technical Review, 9(4):97-104.
  • Çınar, C., Aksoy, F., Erol, D. (2012). The effect of displacer material on the performance of a low temperature differential Stirling engine, International Journal of Energy Research, 36:911-917.
  • Erol, D., Yaman, H. and Doğan, B. (2017). A review development of rhombic drive mechanism used in the Stirling engines. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 78:1044-1067.
  • Finkelstein, T. and Organ, A. J., Air engines the history science and reality of the perfect engine. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers, New York, 2004.
  • Gielen, D., Boshell, F., Saygin, D., Bazilian, M.D. and Wagner, N. (2019). The role of renewable energy in the global energy transformation, Energy Strategy Reviews, 24:38-50.
  • Guelpa, E., Bischi, A., Verda, V., Chertkov, M., Lund, H. (2019). Towards future infrastructures for sustainable multi-energy systems: A review, Energy, 184:2-21.
  • Hansen, K., Mathiesen, B.V., Skov, I. R. (2019). Full energy system transition towards 100% renewable energy in Germany in 2050, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 102:1-13.
  • Krakowski, V., Assoumou, E., Mazauric, V. and Maïzi, N. (2016). Feasible path toward 40–100% renewable energy shares for power supply in France by 2050: A prospective analysis, Applied Energy, 171:501–522.
  • Meijer, R. J. (1965). Philips Stirling engine activities, SAE Technical Paper (No. 650004).
  • Lin, B., Zhu, J. (2019). Determinants of renewable energy technological innovation in China under CO2 emissions constraint, Journal of Environmental Management, 247:662-671.
  • Nathaniel, S. P., Iheonu, C. O. (2019). Carbon dioxide abatement in Africa: The role of renewable and non-renewable energy consumption. Science of The Total Environment, 679:337-345.
  • Organ, A. J., (2014). Stirling cycle engines inner workings and design. John Wiley and Sons, Ltd, (ISBN:9781118818435).
  • Ozcan, M. (2018). The role of renewables in increasing Turkey's self-sufficiency in electrical energy. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 82, 2629-2639.
  • Rinia, H., Pre, F. K. D. (1946). Air engines, Philips Technical Review, 8:129-136.
  • Stirling, R., Stirling Air Engine and The Heat Regenarator, Patent no 4081, 1816.
  • Urieli, I. and Berchowitz, D. M. (1984). Stirling Cycle Engine Analysis. (1. Edition). Bristol: Adam Hilger.
  • Weenen, F. L. V. 1947. “The Construction of the Philips air engine”, Philips Technical Review, 9(5):125-134.

Details

Primary Language English
Subjects Engineering, Mechanical
Journal Section Articles
Authors

Hayri YAMAN
Dr., Kırıkkale University,
0000-0002-9663-7027
Türkiye


Derviş EROL (Primary Author)
Kırıkkale Üniversitesi
0000-0002-3438-9312
Türkiye

Supporting Institution Kırıkkale University Scientific Research Projects Coordination Unit
Project Number 2016/020
Thanks This study was supported within scope of the projects numbered 2016/020 by the Kırıkkale University Scientific Research Projects Coordination Unit. We would like to thank Kırıkkale University Scientific Research Projects Coordination Unit for their financial support.
Publication Date January 31, 2022
Published in Issue Year 2022, Volume 14, Issue 1

Cite

APA Yaman, H. & Erol, D. (2022). Design, Manufacturing and Testing of a Stirling Engine with Slider-Crank Mechanism . International Journal of Engineering Research and Development , 14 (1) , 10-23 . DOI: 10.29137/umagd.895498

All Rights Reserved. Kırıkkale University, Faculty of Engineering.