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Environmentally Friendly Compound Preparation with Green Chemistry Principles from Past to Present

Yıl 2021, Cilt: 1 Sayı: 2, 10 - 16, 30.09.2021

Öz

Many syntheses can be made by physical, chemical or biological methods. However, these methods have many disadvantages such as the use of toxic chemicals harmful to humans, animals, plants and the environment during the synthesis phase, high energy requirement and cost. Researchers have started to work on reducing or eliminating these negative effects in recent years. For this purpose, the concept of Green Chemistry emerged. Green chemistry, also called sustainable chemistry, is a field of chemical and chemical engineering that focuses on the design of products and processes that will minimize or eliminate the use and production of hazardous substances. It play an important roles in biomedicine, nanomedicine, regenerative medicine, pharmaceutics, environmental remediation, catalysis, etc. Over the course of the past decade, green chemistry has demonstrated how fundamental scientific methodologies can protect human health and the environment in an economically beneficial manner. This review explains the importance of Green Chemistry with a series of illustrative examples.

Kaynakça

  • [1] P. Anastas and N. Eghbali, “Green chemistry: principles and practice,” Chemical Society Reviews, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 301-312, 2010.
  • [2] S. Olveira, S. P. Forster and S. Seeger, “Nanocatalysis: academic discipline and industrial realities,” Journal of Nanotechnology, vol. 2014, pp. 1-19, 2014.
  • [3] B. M. Trost, “The atom economy--a search for synthetic efficiency,” Science, vol. 254, no. 5037, pp. 1471-1477, 1991.
  • [4] J. H. Clark and D. J. Macquarrie, (Eds.). “Handbook of green chemistry and technology,” John Wiley and Sons, 2008.
  • [5] K. Alfonsi, J. Colberg, P. J. Dunn, et al. “Green chemistry tools to influence a medicinal chemistry and research chemistry based organisation,” Green Chemistry, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 31-36, 2008.
  • [6] P. Tundo, P. Anastas, D. S. Black, et al. “Synthetic pathways and processes in green chemistry. Introductory overview,” Pure and Applied Chemistry, vol. 72, no. 7, pp. 1207-1228, 2000.
  • [7] H. Duan, D. Wang and Y. Li, “Green chemistry for nanoparticle synthesis,” Chemical Society Reviews, vol. 44, no. 16, pp. 5778-5792, 2015.
  • [8] C. J. Ackerson, P. D. Jadzinsky and R. D. Kornberg, “Thiolate ligands for synthesis of water-soluble gold clusters,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 127, no. 18, pp. 6550-6551, 2005.
  • [9] M. Espino, M. de los Ángeles Fernández, F. J. Gomez and M. F. Silva, “Natural designer solvents for greening analytical chemistry,” TrAC Trends in Analytical Chemistry, vol. 76, pp. 126-136, 2016.
  • [10] C. R. Strauss and R. S. Varma, “Microwaves in green and sustainable chemistry,” Microwave Methods in Organic Synthesis, vol. 266, pp. 199-231, 2006.
  • [11] G. Cravotto and P. Cintas, “The combined use of microwaves and ultrasound: improved tools in process chemistry and organic synthesis,” Chemistry–A European Journal, vol. 13, no. 7, pp. 1902-1909, 2007.
  • [12] P. T. Anastas, “Green chemistry and the role of analytical methodology development,” Critical reviews in analytical chemistry, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 167-175, 1999.
  • [13] T. L., Chen, Kim, Pan, H., et al., “Implementation of green chemistry principles in circular economy system towards sustainable development goals: Challenges and perspectives,” Science of the Total Environment, vol. 716, pp. 136998, 2020.
  • [14] T. J. Collins, “TAML oxidant activators: a new approach to the activation of hydrogen peroxide for environmentally significant problems,” Accounts of Chemical Research, vol. 35, no. 9, pp. 782-790, 2002.
  • [15] B. M. Trost, “The atom economy--a search for synthetic efficiency,” Science, vol. 254, no. 5037, pp. 1471-1477, 1991.
  • [16] K. C. Nicolaou, S. A. Snyder, T. Montagnon, and G. Vassilikogiannakis, “The Diels–Alder reaction in total synthesis,” Angewandte Chemie International Edition, vol. 41, no. 10, pp. 1668-1698, 2002.
  • [17] T. R. Hoye, B. Baire, D. Niu, et al. “The hexadehydro-Diels–Alder reaction,” Nature, vol. 490, no. 7419, pp. 208-212, 2012.
  • [18] P. T. Anastas, L. B. Bartlett, M. M. Kirchoff and T. C. Williamson, ''The role of catalysis in the design, development and implementation of green chemistry'', Catal. Today, vol. 5, no: 1-2, pp. 11-22, 2000.
  • [19] P. T. Anastas, M. M. Kirchhoff and T. C. Williamson, ''Catalysis as foundational of greenchemistry'', Appl. Catal. A: Gener., vol. 221, no: 1-2, pp. 3-13, 2001.
  • [20] J. M. Brown, S. Murai, H. Alper, et al. ''Activation of unreactive bonds and organic synthesis'', Springer Science and Business Media, vol. 3, 1999.
  • [21] S. S. Lin, C. H. Wu, M. C. Sun, Y. P. Ho, ''Microwave-assisted enzyme-catalyzed reactions in various solvent systems'', Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 581-588, 2005.
  • [22] E. Ricca, B. Brucher and J. H. Schrittwieser, ''Multi‐enzymatic cascade reactions: overview and perspectives'', Advanced Synthesis & Catalysis, vol. 353, no. 13, pp. 2239-2262, 2011.
  • [23] M. B. Smith and J. March, ''in March’s advanced organic chemistry: reactions mechanisms and structure'', John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 5th edn, pp. 1231–1237, 2001.
  • [24] B., Torok and Dransfield, T. (Eds.). ''Green chemistry: an inclusive approach'', Elsevier, (2017).
  • [25] A. Figoli, T. Marino, S. Simone, E. Di Nicolo, et al. ''Towards non-toxic solvents for membrane preparation: a review'', Green Chemistry, vol. 16, no. 9, pp. 4034-4059, 2016.
  • [26] J. H. Clark and S. J Tavener, ''Alternative solvents: shades of green'', Organic Process Research and Development, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 149-155, 2007.
  • [27] F. Aricò and P. Tundo, “Dimethyl carbonate as a modern green reagent and solvent,” Russian Chemical Reviews, vol. 79, no. 6, pp. 479, 2010.
  • [28] C. Capello, U. Fischer and K. Hungerbuhler, “What is a green solvent? A comprehensive framework for the environmental assessment of solvents,” Green Chemistry, vol. 9, pp. 927–934, 2007.
  • [29] M. O. Simon and C. J. Li, “Green chemistry oriented organic synthesis in water,” Chemical Society Reviews, vol. 41, no. 4, pp. 1415-1427, 2012.
  • [30] Z. Du, Y. Li, F. Wang, et al. “Indium-Mediated Synthesis of Homoallyl Alcohols in the Aqueous Phase,” Synthetic Communications, vol. 41, no. 11, pp. 1664-1671, 2011.
  • [31] S. Otto, F. Bertoncin and J. B. “Engberts, Lewis acid catalysis of a Diels− Alder reaction in water,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 118, no. 33, pp. 7702-7707, 1996.
  • [32] R. D. Rogers and K. R. Seddon, “Ionic liquids-solvents of the future?,” Science, vol. 302, no. 5646, pp. 792-793, 2003.
  • [33] S. A. Forsyth, J. M. Pringle and D. R. MacFarlane, “Ionic liquids—an overview,” Australian Journal of Chemistry, vol. 57, no. 2, pp. 113-119, 2004.
  • [34] See also: Ionic Liquids Technologies GmbH and Co. KG. ( http://www.iolitec.de).
  • [35] S. K. Lee and H. S. Park, “Green Chemistry at the present in Korea,” Environmental Health and Toxicology, vol. 30, 2015.
  • [36] J. D. Moseley and C. O. Kappe, “A critical assessment of the greenness and energy efficiency of microwave-assisted organic synthesis,” Green Chemistry, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 794-806, 2011.
  • [37] S. Ravichandran and E. Karthikeyan, “Microwave synthesis-a potential tool for green chemistry,” Int J Chem Tech Res, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 466-70, 2011.
  • [38] G. Chatel and R. S. Varma, “Ultrasound and microwave irradiation: contributions of alternative physicochemical activation methods to Green Chemistry,” Green Chemistry, vol. 21, no. 22, pp. 6043-6050, 2019.
  • [39] A. R. Yadav and S. K. Mohite, “A brief review: microwave chemistry and its applications,” Research Journal of Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms and Technology, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 191-197, 2020.
  • [40] V. G. Gude and E. Martinez-Guerra, “Green chemistry of microwave-enhanced biodiesel production. In Production of Biofuels and Chemicals with Microwave,” Springer, Dordrecht. pp. 225-250, 2015.
  • [41] D. L. Hjeresen, J. M. Boese and D. L. Schutt, “Green chemistry and education,” Journal of Chemical Education, vol. 77, no. 12, pp. 1543, 2000.
  • [42] M. Zargar, A. A. Hamid, F. A. Bakar, et al. “Green synthesis and antibacterial effect of silver nanoparticles using Vitex negundo,” L. Molecules, vol. 16, no. 8, pp. 6667-6676, 2011.
  • [43] A. P. Dicks and R. A. Batey, “Confchem conference on educating the next generation: green and sustainable chemistry greening the organic curriculum: development of an under graduate catalytic chemistry course,” Journal of Chemical Education, vol. 90, no. 4, pp. 519-520, 2013.
  • [44] L. L. Cheung, S. A. Styler and A. P. Dicks, “Rapid and convenient synthesis of the 1,4-dihydropyridineprivilegedstructure,” Journal of Chemical Education, vol. 87, no. 6, pp. 628-630, 2010.
  • [45] S. A. Kennedy, “Design of a dynamic undergraduate green chemistry course,” Journal of Chemical Education, vol. 93, no. 4, pp. 645-649, 2016.
  • [46] A. P. Dicks, “Green organic chemistry in lecture and laboratory,” CRC Press, 2019.
  • [47] L. J. Edgar, K. J. Koroluk, M. Golmakani and A. P. Dicks, “Green chemistry decision-making in an upper-level undergraduate organic laboratory,” Journal of Chemical Education, vol. 91, no. 7, pp. 1040-1043, 2014.

Environmentally Friendly Compound Preparation with Green Chemistry Principles from Past to Present

Yıl 2021, Cilt: 1 Sayı: 2, 10 - 16, 30.09.2021

Öz

Many syntheses can be made by physical, chemical or biological methods. However, these methods have many disadvantages such as the use of toxic chemicals harmful to humans, animals, plants and the environment during the synthesis phase, high energy requirement and cost. Researchers have started to work on reducing or eliminating these negative effects in recent years. For this purpose, the concept of Green Chemistry emerged. Green chemistry, also called sustainable chemistry, is a field of chemical and chemical engineering that focuses on the design of products and processes that will minimize or eliminate the use and production of hazardous substances. It play an important roles in biomedicine, nanomedicine, regenerative medicine, pharmaceutics, environmental remediation, catalysis, etc. Over the course of the past decade, green chemistry has demonstrated how fundamental scientific methodologies can protect human health and the environment in an economically beneficial manner. This review explains the importance of Green Chemistry with a series of illustrative examples.

Kaynakça

  • [1] P. Anastas and N. Eghbali, “Green chemistry: principles and practice,” Chemical Society Reviews, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 301-312, 2010.
  • [2] S. Olveira, S. P. Forster and S. Seeger, “Nanocatalysis: academic discipline and industrial realities,” Journal of Nanotechnology, vol. 2014, pp. 1-19, 2014.
  • [3] B. M. Trost, “The atom economy--a search for synthetic efficiency,” Science, vol. 254, no. 5037, pp. 1471-1477, 1991.
  • [4] J. H. Clark and D. J. Macquarrie, (Eds.). “Handbook of green chemistry and technology,” John Wiley and Sons, 2008.
  • [5] K. Alfonsi, J. Colberg, P. J. Dunn, et al. “Green chemistry tools to influence a medicinal chemistry and research chemistry based organisation,” Green Chemistry, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 31-36, 2008.
  • [6] P. Tundo, P. Anastas, D. S. Black, et al. “Synthetic pathways and processes in green chemistry. Introductory overview,” Pure and Applied Chemistry, vol. 72, no. 7, pp. 1207-1228, 2000.
  • [7] H. Duan, D. Wang and Y. Li, “Green chemistry for nanoparticle synthesis,” Chemical Society Reviews, vol. 44, no. 16, pp. 5778-5792, 2015.
  • [8] C. J. Ackerson, P. D. Jadzinsky and R. D. Kornberg, “Thiolate ligands for synthesis of water-soluble gold clusters,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 127, no. 18, pp. 6550-6551, 2005.
  • [9] M. Espino, M. de los Ángeles Fernández, F. J. Gomez and M. F. Silva, “Natural designer solvents for greening analytical chemistry,” TrAC Trends in Analytical Chemistry, vol. 76, pp. 126-136, 2016.
  • [10] C. R. Strauss and R. S. Varma, “Microwaves in green and sustainable chemistry,” Microwave Methods in Organic Synthesis, vol. 266, pp. 199-231, 2006.
  • [11] G. Cravotto and P. Cintas, “The combined use of microwaves and ultrasound: improved tools in process chemistry and organic synthesis,” Chemistry–A European Journal, vol. 13, no. 7, pp. 1902-1909, 2007.
  • [12] P. T. Anastas, “Green chemistry and the role of analytical methodology development,” Critical reviews in analytical chemistry, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 167-175, 1999.
  • [13] T. L., Chen, Kim, Pan, H., et al., “Implementation of green chemistry principles in circular economy system towards sustainable development goals: Challenges and perspectives,” Science of the Total Environment, vol. 716, pp. 136998, 2020.
  • [14] T. J. Collins, “TAML oxidant activators: a new approach to the activation of hydrogen peroxide for environmentally significant problems,” Accounts of Chemical Research, vol. 35, no. 9, pp. 782-790, 2002.
  • [15] B. M. Trost, “The atom economy--a search for synthetic efficiency,” Science, vol. 254, no. 5037, pp. 1471-1477, 1991.
  • [16] K. C. Nicolaou, S. A. Snyder, T. Montagnon, and G. Vassilikogiannakis, “The Diels–Alder reaction in total synthesis,” Angewandte Chemie International Edition, vol. 41, no. 10, pp. 1668-1698, 2002.
  • [17] T. R. Hoye, B. Baire, D. Niu, et al. “The hexadehydro-Diels–Alder reaction,” Nature, vol. 490, no. 7419, pp. 208-212, 2012.
  • [18] P. T. Anastas, L. B. Bartlett, M. M. Kirchoff and T. C. Williamson, ''The role of catalysis in the design, development and implementation of green chemistry'', Catal. Today, vol. 5, no: 1-2, pp. 11-22, 2000.
  • [19] P. T. Anastas, M. M. Kirchhoff and T. C. Williamson, ''Catalysis as foundational of greenchemistry'', Appl. Catal. A: Gener., vol. 221, no: 1-2, pp. 3-13, 2001.
  • [20] J. M. Brown, S. Murai, H. Alper, et al. ''Activation of unreactive bonds and organic synthesis'', Springer Science and Business Media, vol. 3, 1999.
  • [21] S. S. Lin, C. H. Wu, M. C. Sun, Y. P. Ho, ''Microwave-assisted enzyme-catalyzed reactions in various solvent systems'', Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 581-588, 2005.
  • [22] E. Ricca, B. Brucher and J. H. Schrittwieser, ''Multi‐enzymatic cascade reactions: overview and perspectives'', Advanced Synthesis & Catalysis, vol. 353, no. 13, pp. 2239-2262, 2011.
  • [23] M. B. Smith and J. March, ''in March’s advanced organic chemistry: reactions mechanisms and structure'', John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 5th edn, pp. 1231–1237, 2001.
  • [24] B., Torok and Dransfield, T. (Eds.). ''Green chemistry: an inclusive approach'', Elsevier, (2017).
  • [25] A. Figoli, T. Marino, S. Simone, E. Di Nicolo, et al. ''Towards non-toxic solvents for membrane preparation: a review'', Green Chemistry, vol. 16, no. 9, pp. 4034-4059, 2016.
  • [26] J. H. Clark and S. J Tavener, ''Alternative solvents: shades of green'', Organic Process Research and Development, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 149-155, 2007.
  • [27] F. Aricò and P. Tundo, “Dimethyl carbonate as a modern green reagent and solvent,” Russian Chemical Reviews, vol. 79, no. 6, pp. 479, 2010.
  • [28] C. Capello, U. Fischer and K. Hungerbuhler, “What is a green solvent? A comprehensive framework for the environmental assessment of solvents,” Green Chemistry, vol. 9, pp. 927–934, 2007.
  • [29] M. O. Simon and C. J. Li, “Green chemistry oriented organic synthesis in water,” Chemical Society Reviews, vol. 41, no. 4, pp. 1415-1427, 2012.
  • [30] Z. Du, Y. Li, F. Wang, et al. “Indium-Mediated Synthesis of Homoallyl Alcohols in the Aqueous Phase,” Synthetic Communications, vol. 41, no. 11, pp. 1664-1671, 2011.
  • [31] S. Otto, F. Bertoncin and J. B. “Engberts, Lewis acid catalysis of a Diels− Alder reaction in water,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 118, no. 33, pp. 7702-7707, 1996.
  • [32] R. D. Rogers and K. R. Seddon, “Ionic liquids-solvents of the future?,” Science, vol. 302, no. 5646, pp. 792-793, 2003.
  • [33] S. A. Forsyth, J. M. Pringle and D. R. MacFarlane, “Ionic liquids—an overview,” Australian Journal of Chemistry, vol. 57, no. 2, pp. 113-119, 2004.
  • [34] See also: Ionic Liquids Technologies GmbH and Co. KG. ( http://www.iolitec.de).
  • [35] S. K. Lee and H. S. Park, “Green Chemistry at the present in Korea,” Environmental Health and Toxicology, vol. 30, 2015.
  • [36] J. D. Moseley and C. O. Kappe, “A critical assessment of the greenness and energy efficiency of microwave-assisted organic synthesis,” Green Chemistry, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 794-806, 2011.
  • [37] S. Ravichandran and E. Karthikeyan, “Microwave synthesis-a potential tool for green chemistry,” Int J Chem Tech Res, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 466-70, 2011.
  • [38] G. Chatel and R. S. Varma, “Ultrasound and microwave irradiation: contributions of alternative physicochemical activation methods to Green Chemistry,” Green Chemistry, vol. 21, no. 22, pp. 6043-6050, 2019.
  • [39] A. R. Yadav and S. K. Mohite, “A brief review: microwave chemistry and its applications,” Research Journal of Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms and Technology, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 191-197, 2020.
  • [40] V. G. Gude and E. Martinez-Guerra, “Green chemistry of microwave-enhanced biodiesel production. In Production of Biofuels and Chemicals with Microwave,” Springer, Dordrecht. pp. 225-250, 2015.
  • [41] D. L. Hjeresen, J. M. Boese and D. L. Schutt, “Green chemistry and education,” Journal of Chemical Education, vol. 77, no. 12, pp. 1543, 2000.
  • [42] M. Zargar, A. A. Hamid, F. A. Bakar, et al. “Green synthesis and antibacterial effect of silver nanoparticles using Vitex negundo,” L. Molecules, vol. 16, no. 8, pp. 6667-6676, 2011.
  • [43] A. P. Dicks and R. A. Batey, “Confchem conference on educating the next generation: green and sustainable chemistry greening the organic curriculum: development of an under graduate catalytic chemistry course,” Journal of Chemical Education, vol. 90, no. 4, pp. 519-520, 2013.
  • [44] L. L. Cheung, S. A. Styler and A. P. Dicks, “Rapid and convenient synthesis of the 1,4-dihydropyridineprivilegedstructure,” Journal of Chemical Education, vol. 87, no. 6, pp. 628-630, 2010.
  • [45] S. A. Kennedy, “Design of a dynamic undergraduate green chemistry course,” Journal of Chemical Education, vol. 93, no. 4, pp. 645-649, 2016.
  • [46] A. P. Dicks, “Green organic chemistry in lecture and laboratory,” CRC Press, 2019.
  • [47] L. J. Edgar, K. J. Koroluk, M. Golmakani and A. P. Dicks, “Green chemistry decision-making in an upper-level undergraduate organic laboratory,” Journal of Chemical Education, vol. 91, no. 7, pp. 1040-1043, 2014.

Ayrıntılar

Birincil Dil Türkçe
Konular Çevre Bilimleri
Bölüm Derlemeler
Yazarlar

Nurcan BERBER

Yayımlanma Tarihi 30 Eylül 2021
Yayımlandığı Sayı Yıl 2021 Cilt: 1 Sayı: 2

Kaynak Göster

IEEE N. BERBER, “Environmentally Friendly Compound Preparation with Green Chemistry Principles from Past to Present”, Etoxec, c. 1, sy. 2, ss. 10–16, 2021.