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Yıl 2019, Cilt 3, Sayı 3, 79 - 84, 31.12.2019
https://doi.org/10.30704/http-www-jivs-net.641538

Öz

Kaynakça

  • Aminov, R. I. (2013). Role of archaea in human disease. Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology, 10.3389.
  • Balch, W. E., Fox, G. E., Magrum, L. J., Woese, C. R., & Wolfe, R. S. (1979). Methanogens: reevaluation of a uniquebiological group. Microbiological reviews, 43, 260-296.
  • Bennewies T. T., Motro, Y., Hallin, P. F., & Lund, O. (2006). Ten years of bacterial genome sequencing: comparative-genomics-based discoveries. Functional and integrative genomics , 6(3) 165-185.
  • Bartold, P. M., & Van Dyke, T. E. (2013). Periodontitis: a host-mediated disruption of microbial homeostasis. Unlearning learned concepts. Periodontology, 62, 203-217.
  • Bonelo, G., Ventosa., A. Megias., M. & Ruiz-Berraquero, F. (1984). The sensitivity of halobacteria to antibiotics. FEMS Microbiology letters, 21, 341-345.
  • Cavicchioli, R., Curmi, P. M. G., Saunders, N., & Thomas, T. (2003). Pathogenic archaea: do they exist? BioEssays, 25(11), 1119-1128.   Conlan, J. W., Krishnan, L. Willick., G. E. Patel.,G. B. & Sprott, G. D. (2001). Immunization of mice with lipopeptide antigens encapsulated in novel liposomes prepared from the polar lipids of various Archaeobacteria elicits rapid and prolonged specific protective immunity against infection with the facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Vaccine, 19, 3509-3517.
  • Caporaso J.G., Lauber, C. L., Costello, E. K., Berg-Lyons, D., Gonzalez, A., Stombaugh, J., Knights, D., Gajer, P., Ravel, J., Fierer, N., Gordon, J. I., & Knight, R. (2011). Moving pictures of the human microbiome. Genome biology, 12(5), R50.
  • Chow, J., Tang, H., & Mazmanian, K. S. (2011). Pathobionts of the gastrointestinal microbiota and inflammatory disease. Current opinion in immunology,23(4), 473-480. Conway de Macario, E., & Macario, A. J. (2008). Methanogenic archaea in health and disease: a novel paradigm of microbial pathogenesis. International journal of medical microbiology, 299(2), 99-108.
  • Eckburg, P. B., Lepp, P. W., & Relman, D. A. (2003). Archaea and their potential role in human disease. Infection and Immunity, 71(2), 591-596.   Carbonero, F., Benefiel, A. C., Alizadeh-Ghamsari, A. H., Gaskins, H. R. (2012). Microbial pathways in colonic sulfur metabolism and links with health and disease. Frontiers in physiology, 3, 448.
  • Gill E. E., & Brinkman F. S. (2011). The proportional lack of archaeal pathogens: Do viruses/phages hold the key? BioEssays,33(4), 248-254.
  • Gijzen, H. J., Broers, C. A., Barughare, M. & Stumm, C. K. (1991). Methanogenic bacteria as endosymbionts of the ciliate Nyctotherus ovalis in the cockroach hindgut. Applied and rnvironmental microbiology, 57, 1630-1634.
  • Hulcr, J., Latimer, A. M. Henley, J. B., Rountree.N. R., Fierer, N., Lucky, A., Lowman, M. D. & Dunn R. R. (2012). A jungle in there: Bacteria in belly buttons are highly diverse, but predictable. PloSone 7, e47712. Kandler, O., & Konig H. (1998). Cell wall polymers in Archaea (Archaebacteria). Cellular and molecular life sciences, 54, 305-308.
  • Krishnan, L., Dicaire, C. J., Patel, G. B., & Sprott. G. D. (2000). Archaeosome vaccine adjuvants induce strong humoral, cell-mediated, and memory responses: comparison to conventional liposomes and alum. Infection and immunity, 68, 54-63.
  • Krishnan, L., Sad, S., Patel, G. B. & Sprott, G. D. (2001). The potent adjuvant activity of archaeosomes correlates to the recruitment and activation of macrophages and dendritic cells in vivo. Journal of immunology, 166, 1885-1893.
  • Lawrence, J. G. (2005). Horizontal and vertical gene transfer: the life history of pathogens. Contributions to microbiology, 12, 255-271.
  • Lepp, P. W., Brinig, M. M., Ouverney, C. C., Palm, K., Armitage, G. C., & Relman, D. (2004).  Proceedings of the national academy of sciences, 101(16), 6176-6181.
  • Lewis, S., Cochrane, S. (2007). Alteration of sulfate and hydrogen metabolism in the human colon by changing intestinal transit rate. American journal of gastroenterology, 102, 624-633.
  • Liu, B., Faller, L. L., Klitgord, N., Mazumdar, V., Ghodsi M., Sommer, D. D., Gibbons, T. R., Treangen T. J., Chang, Y. C., Li, S., Stine, O. C., Hasturk, H., Kasif S., Segrè D., Pop, M., & Amar, S. (2012). Deep sequencing of the oral microbiome reveals signatures of periodontal disease. PLoS one, 7(6):e37919.
  • Martin, W. 2004. Pathogenic archaebacteria: do they not exist because archaebacteria use different vitamins? BioEssays, 26, 592-593.
  • McKay, L. F., Eastwood, M. A., Brydon, W. G. (1985).  Methane excretion in man -a study of breath, flatus, and faeces. Gut 26, 69-74.
  • Madigan, M. T., Martinko, J. M. & Parker J. (2000). Prokaryotic diversity: the Archaea, In M. T. Madigan, J. M. Martinko, and J. Parker (ed). Brock biology of microorganisms. p. 546–572. New Jearsy, US : Prentice-Hall, Inc.
  • Maczulak, A. E., Wolin, M. J., & Miller, T. L. (1989). Increase incolonic methanogens and total anaerobes in aging rats. Applied and environmental microbiology, 55, 2468-2473.
  • McKay, L. F., Brydon, W. G., Eastwood, M. A., & Housley, E. (1983). The influence of peripheral vascular disease onmethanogenesis in man. Atherosclerosis, 47(1), 77-81.
  • Moissl-Eichinger, C., Probst, A. J., Birarda, G., Auerbach A, Koskinen, K., Wolf, P., & Holman, H. N. (2017). Human age and skin physiology shape diversity and abundance of Archaea on skin. Scientific reports, 7(1), 4039.
  • Pique ́, J. M., Pallare ́s, M., Cuso ́, E., Vilar-Bonet, J., & Gassull, M. A. (1984). Methane production and colon cancer. Gastroenterol, 87, 601-605.
  • Probst, A. J., Auerbach, A. K. & Moissl-Eichinger, C. (2013). Archaea on human skin. PloS one 8, e65388.
  • Relman, D. A., Loutit, J. S. Schmidt, T. M. Falkow, S. & Tompkins, L. S. (1990). The agent of bacillary angiomatosis. An approach to the identification of uncultured pathogens. New England journal of medicine, 323, 1573–1580.
  • Relman, D. A., Schmidt, T. M., MacDermott, R. P. & S. Falkow (1992). Identification of the uncultured bacillus of Whipple’s disease. New England journal of medicine, 327(5), 293-301.
  • Scanlan, P. D.,  Shanahan, F., & Marchesi, J. R. (2008). Human methanogen diversity and incidence in healthy and diseased colonic groups using mcrA gene analysis. BMC microbiology, 20(8), 79.
  • Samuel, B. S., & Gordon, J. I. (2006). A humanized gnotobiotic mouse model of host–archaeal–bacterial mutualism. Proceedings of the national academy of sciences, 103, 10011-10016.
  • Tseng, T. T., K. S. Gratwick., J. Kollman, D. Park., D. H. Nies., A. Goffeau., & M. H. Saier, Jr. (1999).The RND permease superfamily: an ancient, ubiquitous and diverse family that includes human disease and development proteins. Journal of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, 1(1), 107-125.
  • Weaver, G. A., Krause, J. A., Miller, T. L., & Wolin, M. J.(1986). Incidence of methanogenic bacteria in a sigmoidoscopypopulation: an association of methanogenic bacteria anddiverticulosis. Gut, 27, 698-704.
  • Wilson, K. H., Blitchington, R., Frothingham, R. & Wilson, J. A. (1991). Phylogeny of the Whipple’s-disease-associated bacterium. Lancet, 338, 474–475.

Archaea and their potential pathogenicity in human and animal diseases.

Yıl 2019, Cilt 3, Sayı 3, 79 - 84, 31.12.2019
https://doi.org/10.30704/http-www-jivs-net.641538

Öz

 There are hundreds of organisms that infect and cause disease in humans and animals. These organisms can be bacteria and single-celled eukaryote, as well as a few parasites. Archaea, one of the three domain of life, immensely diverse group of prokaryotes and includes a number of “extremophiles” that develop in such environments as hot springs, salt lakes, human and animal gut, volcanic submarines and low, high pH habitats. It is puzzling that despite being one of the most numerous and ubiquitous life forms on earth, no member of the domain Archaea has been described as human or animal pathogen. The absence of pathogenic Archaea in the taxonomy database is statistically highly significant. The aim of this article is to display a brief overview of what is currently known about archaea and archaeal potential pathogenicity in and on human being and animals.

Kaynakça

  • Aminov, R. I. (2013). Role of archaea in human disease. Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology, 10.3389.
  • Balch, W. E., Fox, G. E., Magrum, L. J., Woese, C. R., & Wolfe, R. S. (1979). Methanogens: reevaluation of a uniquebiological group. Microbiological reviews, 43, 260-296.
  • Bennewies T. T., Motro, Y., Hallin, P. F., & Lund, O. (2006). Ten years of bacterial genome sequencing: comparative-genomics-based discoveries. Functional and integrative genomics , 6(3) 165-185.
  • Bartold, P. M., & Van Dyke, T. E. (2013). Periodontitis: a host-mediated disruption of microbial homeostasis. Unlearning learned concepts. Periodontology, 62, 203-217.
  • Bonelo, G., Ventosa., A. Megias., M. & Ruiz-Berraquero, F. (1984). The sensitivity of halobacteria to antibiotics. FEMS Microbiology letters, 21, 341-345.
  • Cavicchioli, R., Curmi, P. M. G., Saunders, N., & Thomas, T. (2003). Pathogenic archaea: do they exist? BioEssays, 25(11), 1119-1128.   Conlan, J. W., Krishnan, L. Willick., G. E. Patel.,G. B. & Sprott, G. D. (2001). Immunization of mice with lipopeptide antigens encapsulated in novel liposomes prepared from the polar lipids of various Archaeobacteria elicits rapid and prolonged specific protective immunity against infection with the facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Vaccine, 19, 3509-3517.
  • Caporaso J.G., Lauber, C. L., Costello, E. K., Berg-Lyons, D., Gonzalez, A., Stombaugh, J., Knights, D., Gajer, P., Ravel, J., Fierer, N., Gordon, J. I., & Knight, R. (2011). Moving pictures of the human microbiome. Genome biology, 12(5), R50.
  • Chow, J., Tang, H., & Mazmanian, K. S. (2011). Pathobionts of the gastrointestinal microbiota and inflammatory disease. Current opinion in immunology,23(4), 473-480. Conway de Macario, E., & Macario, A. J. (2008). Methanogenic archaea in health and disease: a novel paradigm of microbial pathogenesis. International journal of medical microbiology, 299(2), 99-108.
  • Eckburg, P. B., Lepp, P. W., & Relman, D. A. (2003). Archaea and their potential role in human disease. Infection and Immunity, 71(2), 591-596.   Carbonero, F., Benefiel, A. C., Alizadeh-Ghamsari, A. H., Gaskins, H. R. (2012). Microbial pathways in colonic sulfur metabolism and links with health and disease. Frontiers in physiology, 3, 448.
  • Gill E. E., & Brinkman F. S. (2011). The proportional lack of archaeal pathogens: Do viruses/phages hold the key? BioEssays,33(4), 248-254.
  • Gijzen, H. J., Broers, C. A., Barughare, M. & Stumm, C. K. (1991). Methanogenic bacteria as endosymbionts of the ciliate Nyctotherus ovalis in the cockroach hindgut. Applied and rnvironmental microbiology, 57, 1630-1634.
  • Hulcr, J., Latimer, A. M. Henley, J. B., Rountree.N. R., Fierer, N., Lucky, A., Lowman, M. D. & Dunn R. R. (2012). A jungle in there: Bacteria in belly buttons are highly diverse, but predictable. PloSone 7, e47712. Kandler, O., & Konig H. (1998). Cell wall polymers in Archaea (Archaebacteria). Cellular and molecular life sciences, 54, 305-308.
  • Krishnan, L., Dicaire, C. J., Patel, G. B., & Sprott. G. D. (2000). Archaeosome vaccine adjuvants induce strong humoral, cell-mediated, and memory responses: comparison to conventional liposomes and alum. Infection and immunity, 68, 54-63.
  • Krishnan, L., Sad, S., Patel, G. B. & Sprott, G. D. (2001). The potent adjuvant activity of archaeosomes correlates to the recruitment and activation of macrophages and dendritic cells in vivo. Journal of immunology, 166, 1885-1893.
  • Lawrence, J. G. (2005). Horizontal and vertical gene transfer: the life history of pathogens. Contributions to microbiology, 12, 255-271.
  • Lepp, P. W., Brinig, M. M., Ouverney, C. C., Palm, K., Armitage, G. C., & Relman, D. (2004).  Proceedings of the national academy of sciences, 101(16), 6176-6181.
  • Lewis, S., Cochrane, S. (2007). Alteration of sulfate and hydrogen metabolism in the human colon by changing intestinal transit rate. American journal of gastroenterology, 102, 624-633.
  • Liu, B., Faller, L. L., Klitgord, N., Mazumdar, V., Ghodsi M., Sommer, D. D., Gibbons, T. R., Treangen T. J., Chang, Y. C., Li, S., Stine, O. C., Hasturk, H., Kasif S., Segrè D., Pop, M., & Amar, S. (2012). Deep sequencing of the oral microbiome reveals signatures of periodontal disease. PLoS one, 7(6):e37919.
  • Martin, W. 2004. Pathogenic archaebacteria: do they not exist because archaebacteria use different vitamins? BioEssays, 26, 592-593.
  • McKay, L. F., Eastwood, M. A., Brydon, W. G. (1985).  Methane excretion in man -a study of breath, flatus, and faeces. Gut 26, 69-74.
  • Madigan, M. T., Martinko, J. M. & Parker J. (2000). Prokaryotic diversity: the Archaea, In M. T. Madigan, J. M. Martinko, and J. Parker (ed). Brock biology of microorganisms. p. 546–572. New Jearsy, US : Prentice-Hall, Inc.
  • Maczulak, A. E., Wolin, M. J., & Miller, T. L. (1989). Increase incolonic methanogens and total anaerobes in aging rats. Applied and environmental microbiology, 55, 2468-2473.
  • McKay, L. F., Brydon, W. G., Eastwood, M. A., & Housley, E. (1983). The influence of peripheral vascular disease onmethanogenesis in man. Atherosclerosis, 47(1), 77-81.
  • Moissl-Eichinger, C., Probst, A. J., Birarda, G., Auerbach A, Koskinen, K., Wolf, P., & Holman, H. N. (2017). Human age and skin physiology shape diversity and abundance of Archaea on skin. Scientific reports, 7(1), 4039.
  • Pique ́, J. M., Pallare ́s, M., Cuso ́, E., Vilar-Bonet, J., & Gassull, M. A. (1984). Methane production and colon cancer. Gastroenterol, 87, 601-605.
  • Probst, A. J., Auerbach, A. K. & Moissl-Eichinger, C. (2013). Archaea on human skin. PloS one 8, e65388.
  • Relman, D. A., Loutit, J. S. Schmidt, T. M. Falkow, S. & Tompkins, L. S. (1990). The agent of bacillary angiomatosis. An approach to the identification of uncultured pathogens. New England journal of medicine, 323, 1573–1580.
  • Relman, D. A., Schmidt, T. M., MacDermott, R. P. & S. Falkow (1992). Identification of the uncultured bacillus of Whipple’s disease. New England journal of medicine, 327(5), 293-301.
  • Scanlan, P. D.,  Shanahan, F., & Marchesi, J. R. (2008). Human methanogen diversity and incidence in healthy and diseased colonic groups using mcrA gene analysis. BMC microbiology, 20(8), 79.
  • Samuel, B. S., & Gordon, J. I. (2006). A humanized gnotobiotic mouse model of host–archaeal–bacterial mutualism. Proceedings of the national academy of sciences, 103, 10011-10016.
  • Tseng, T. T., K. S. Gratwick., J. Kollman, D. Park., D. H. Nies., A. Goffeau., & M. H. Saier, Jr. (1999).The RND permease superfamily: an ancient, ubiquitous and diverse family that includes human disease and development proteins. Journal of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, 1(1), 107-125.
  • Weaver, G. A., Krause, J. A., Miller, T. L., & Wolin, M. J.(1986). Incidence of methanogenic bacteria in a sigmoidoscopypopulation: an association of methanogenic bacteria anddiverticulosis. Gut, 27, 698-704.
  • Wilson, K. H., Blitchington, R., Frothingham, R. & Wilson, J. A. (1991). Phylogeny of the Whipple’s-disease-associated bacterium. Lancet, 338, 474–475.

Ayrıntılar

Birincil Dil İngilizce
Bölüm Derleme Makaleler
Yazarlar

Aikerim KUMONDOROVA> (Sorumlu Yazar)
İstanbul Üniversitesi- Cerrahpaşa/ Veteriner Fakültesi
0000-0001-7341-1597
Türkiye


Serkan İKİZ>
İstanbul Üniversitesi- Cerrahpaşa/ Veteriner Fakültesi
0000-0001-6502-0780
Türkiye

Yayımlanma Tarihi 31 Aralık 2019
Yayınlandığı Sayı Yıl 2019, Cilt 3, Sayı 3

Kaynak Göster

APA Kumondorova, A. & İkiz, S. (2019). Archaea and their potential pathogenicity in human and animal diseases. . Journal of Istanbul Veterinary Sciences , 3 (3) , 79-84 . DOI: 10.30704/http-www-jivs-net.641538

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