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Herb diversity and their medicinal uses in Biodiversity Conservation area of Jnanabharathi Campus, Bangalore University, Karnataka

Year 2022, Volume 15, Issue 1, 73 - 83, 15.04.2022
https://doi.org/10.46309/biodicon.2022.930000

Abstract

Unnoticed, breeding beneath the canopy in the woods, the herb layer serves a special role in maintaining the structure and function of forests, this stratum remains an underappreciated aspect of forest ecosystems. The Bangalore University, Jnanabharathi campus, historically being a scrub forest facilitating the growth of enormous vegetation ranging from large canopied trees to understory layer comprising of herbs and grasses. The present study was intended to assess the herbs diversity, richness and medicinal use to emphasize its role in tropical dry forest ecosystems, using a quadrate method. A total of 61 species were recorded, comprising of 52 species of herbs, representing 28 families, of which (77%) belongs to native and (23%) exotic (non-native) category. In addition to herbs four species of grass and five climber species of procumbent were also recorded in the same quadrate. Desmodium triflorum with1014 individuals and (IVI = 11.76) was found to be dominant species followed by Evolvulus alsinoides, Vicoa indica and Calyptocarpus vialis. Astraceae and Fabaceae was the most abundant family followed by Lameaceae and Acanthaceae. The diversity indices were estimated to determine the richness, diversity and evenness of herbaceous species, among three sectors, sector-1 is found to have Shannon index of 3.14 and Simpson index of 0.95, where highest Evenness index of 0.64 was associated with sector-3 followed by Sector-8 and Sector-1. From the study it was also revealed that all the three sectors were significantly depicting clumped or contagious pattern of herb distribution. The study indicates that understory herbaceous layer plays very important role in regeneration of canopy species in scrub forest and it support regeneration of many medicinal herbs. Hence University authorities should protect herb layer from fire, grazing and other anthropogenic disturbances.

References

  • [1] Alagesaboopathi, C. (2013). Ethno medicinal plants used for the treatment of snake bites by Malayali tribal’s and rural people in Salem district, Tamilnadu, India. International journal of Biosciences, 3(2), 42-53. http://dx.doi.org/10.12692/ijb/3.2.42-53
  • [2] Anderson, R. C., Loucks, O. L., & Swain, A. M. (1969). Herbaceous response to canopy cover, light intensity, and throughfall precipitation in coniferous forests. Ecology, 50(2), 255-263. https://doi.org/10.2307/1934853
  • [3] Chopra, R. N., Chopra, I. C., Handa, K. L., & Kapur, L. D. (1958). Chopra’s Indigenous Drugs of India (2nd ed.).Kolkata, Academic Publishers.
  • [4] Djordjevic, S. M. (2017). From medicinal plant raw material to herbal remedies. In H. A. El-Shemy (Ed.), Aromatic and Medicinal Plants- Back to Nature (pp. 269-288). DOI: 10.5772/63696
  • [5] Dubey, P., Raghubanshi, A. S., & Dwivedi, A. K. (2017). Functional traits of herbs in dry deciduous forest: an analysis. Journal of Global Biosciences, 6(5), 4999-5011.
  • [6] Fern, K, (2019). Tropical.thefern.info. Retrieved from http://tropical.theferns.info/viewtropical.php/ id=Desmodium+triflorum.
  • [7] Franche, C., Lindström, K., & Elmerich, C. (2009). Nitrogen-fixing bacteria associated with leguminous and non-leguminous plants. Plant and soil, 321(1-2), 35-59. DOI 10.1007/s11104-008-9833-8
  • [8] Ghosh, P., & Rahaman, C. H. (2016). Pharmacognostic studies and phytochemical screening of aerial and root parts of Cyanotistuberosa (Roxb.) Schult. &Schult. f.-an ethnomedicinal herb. World Journal of Pharmaceutical Research, 5(2), 1580-1601.
  • [9] Gilliam, F. S. (2014). The herbaceous layer in forests of Eastern North America. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
  • [10] Gilliam, F. S., & Roberts, M. R. (2003). The dynamic nature of the herbaceous layer. In F. S. Gilliam & M.R. Robert (Eds.), The herbaceous layer in forests of Eastern North America (1st ed., pp. 323-337). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. Retrieved from http://www.franksgilliam.com/uploads/1/2/0/1/120187503/gilliam___roberts__2003_--herb_book_ch_14.pdf
  • [11] Jolls, C. L., & Whigham, D. F. (2014). Populations of and threats to rare plants of the herb layer: still more challenges and opportunities for conservation biologists. In Gilliam, F. S. (Ed.), The herbaceous layer in forests of Eastern North America (2nd ed., pp.134–164). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199837656.003.0006
  • [12] Kakpure, M. R., &Rothe, S. P. (2012). Qualitative phytochemical screening of Indian witchweed: Strigaasiatica (L.) O. Ktze-an unexplored medicinal parasitic plant. Journal of Experimental Sciences, 3(3), 28-31.
  • [13] Kamboj, Ved P. (2000). Herbal medicine. Current science, 78(1), 35-39.
  • [14] Khan, M. S. A., & Ahmad, I. (2019). Herbal medicine: current trends and future prospects. In New Look to Phytomedicine Academic Press,3-13.https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-814619-4.00001-X
  • [15] Khare, C. P. (2008). Indian medicinal plants: an illustrated dictionary. New York, NY: Springer Science & Business Media.
  • [16] Khurm, M., Chaudhry, B. A., Uzair, M., & Janbaz, K. H. (2016). Antimicrobial, Cytotoxic, Phytotoxic and Antioxidant Potential of Heliotropium strigosum Willd. Medicines, 3(3),20. https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines3030020
  • [17] Makhija, I. K., &Khamar, D. (2010). Anti-snake venom properties of medicinal plants. Der Pharmacia Lettre, 2(5), 399-411.
  • [18] Maridass, M., & De Britto, A. J. (2008). Origins of plant derived medicines. Ethnobotanical Leaflets, 2008(1), 44.
  • [19] Misra, R. (1968). Ecology Work Book. Calcutta: Oxford & IBH Publishing Company.
  • [20] Mukherjee, A., & Sarma, K. (2014). Community structure of plant species in Okhla Bird Sanctuary, Delhi, India. International Journal of Conservation Science, 5(3), 397-408.
  • [21] Muller, R. N. (2003). Nutrient relations of the herbaceous layer in deciduous forest ecosystems. In F.S. Gilliam & M.R. Robert (Eds.), The herbaceous layer in forests of Eastern North America (1st ed., pp.15-37). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199837656.003.0002
  • [22] Nagaraja, B.C.,Prasanna Kumar C.N. & Vidyashree.S, (2020).Tree Diversity and their Fruiting Attributes in Periurban Bangalore University Campus. Indian forester, 146 (7), 615-622.
  • [23] Okubo, A., & Mitchell, J. G. (2001). Patchy distribution and diffusion. In A. Okubo & S. A. Levin (Eds.), Diffusion and Ecological Problems: Modern Perspectives, (2nd ed., pp. 268-297) New York, NY: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4757-4978-6_9
  • [24] Pal, S. K., & Shukla, Y. (2003). Herbal medicine: current status and the future. Asian pacific journal of cancer prevention, 4(4), 281-288.
  • [25] Pielou,E. C. (1966). The measurement of diversity in different types of biological collections. Journal of theoretical biology, 13 (1), 131-144. https://doi.org/10.1016/0022-5193(66)90013-0
  • [26] Ramaswamy, S. V., &Razi, B. A. (1973). Flora of Bangalore District. Mysore, Prasaranga: University of Mysore.
  • [27] Rao, S, K., Swamy, R, K., Kumar, D, Arun Singh R. and K. Gopalakrishna Bhat (2019). Flora of Peninsular India. Retrivedfrom http://peninsula.ces.iisc.ac.in/plants.
  • [28] Retnam KR, John De Britto A. (2007). Antimicrobial activity of a medicinal plant Hybanthus enneaspermus (Linn.) F. Muell. Natural Product Radiance, 6(5), 366–368.
  • [29] Saha, S., Deb, B., Mullick, J. B., Choudhury, P. R., Saha, P., Ghosh, B., &Sil, S. K. (2016). Antibacterial Activity of Evolvulus nummularius against Standard ATCC Gram Positive and Gram Negative Strains: Studies on MIC, MBC, Growth Curve Analysis and ROS Generation. International Journal of Pure & Applied Bioscience, 4(4), 205-211.http://dx.doi.org/10.18782/2320-7051.2357
  • [30] Shannon, C.E., &Weaver, W. (1949). The Mathematical Theory of communication. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press.
  • [31] Simpson, E. H. (1949). Measurement of diversity. Nature, 163(4148), 688.
  • [32] Singh, N. K., Seth, A., &Maurya, S. K. (2015). Croton bonplandianum Baill.: A rich source of essential fatty acids, linoleic and linolenic acid. Der Pharma Chemica, 7(3), 85-88.
  • [33] Udayashankar, A. C., Nandhini, M., Rajini, S. B., & Prakash, H. S. (2019). Pharmacological significance of medicinal herb Eclipta alba L.–a review. International Journal of Pharmaceutical Science and Research, 10(8), 3592-3606. http://dx.doi.org/10.13040/IJPSR.0975-8232.10(8).3592-06
  • [34] Uritu, C. M., Mihai, C. T., Stanciu, G. D., Dodi, G., Alexa-Stratulat, T., Luca, A.,& Tamba, B. I. (2018). Medicinal plants of the family Lamiaceae in pain therapy: A review. Pain Research and Management, 1-44. https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/7801543
  • [35] Wijaya, S., Nee, T. K., Jin, K. T., Hon, L. K., San, L. H., & Wiart, C. (2011). Antibacterial and antioxidant activities of Synedrellanodiflora (L.) Gaertn.(Asteraceae). Journal of complementary and Integrative Medicine, 8(1), 1553-3840.DOI: 10.2202/1553-3840.149
  • [36] KATAR, N., & KATAR, D. (2020). Effect of Different Row Spaces on Yield and Quality of Anise (Pimpinella anisum) under Eskisehir Ecological Conditions. Biological Diversity and Conservation, 13(3), 314-321. DOI: 10.46309/biodicon.2020.769561

Herb diversity and their medicinal uses in Biodiversity Conservation area of Jnanabharathi Campus, Bangalore University, Karnataka

Year 2022, Volume 15, Issue 1, 73 - 83, 15.04.2022
https://doi.org/10.46309/biodicon.2022.930000

Abstract

Unnoticed, breeding beneath the canopy in the woods, the herb layer serves a special role in maintaining the structure and function of forests, this stratum remains an underappreciated aspect of forest ecosystems. The Bangalore University, Jnanabharathi campus, historically being a scrub forest facilitating the growth of enormous vegetation ranging from large canopied trees to understory layer comprising of herbs and grasses. The present study was intended to assess the herbs diversity, richness and medicinal use to emphasize its role in tropical dry forest ecosystems, using a quadrate method. A total of 61 species were recorded, comprising of 52 species of herbs, representing 28 families, of which (77%) belongs to native and (23%) exotic (non-native) category. In addition to herbs four species of grass and five climber species of procumbent were also recorded in the same quadrate. Desmodium triflorum with 1014 individuals and (IVI = 11.76) was found to be dominant species followed by Evolvulus alsinoides, Vicoa indica and Calyptocarpus vialis. Astraceae and Fabaceae was the most abundant family followed by Lameaceae and Acanthaceae. The diversity indices were estimated to determine the richness, diversity and evenness of herbaceous species, among three sectors, sector-1 is found to have Shannon index of 3.14 and Simpson index of 0.95, where highest Evenness index of 0.64 was associated with sector-3 followed by Sector-8 and Sector-1. From the study it was also revealed that all the three sectors were significantly depicting clumped or contagious pattern of herb distribution. The study indicates that understory herbaceous layer plays very important role in regeneration of canopy species in scrub forest and it support regeneration of many medicinal herbs. Hence University authorities should protect herb layer from fire, grazing and other anthropogenic disturbances.

References

  • [1] Alagesaboopathi, C. (2013). Ethno medicinal plants used for the treatment of snake bites by Malayali tribal’s and rural people in Salem district, Tamilnadu, India. International journal of Biosciences, 3(2), 42-53. http://dx.doi.org/10.12692/ijb/3.2.42-53
  • [2] Anderson, R. C., Loucks, O. L., & Swain, A. M. (1969). Herbaceous response to canopy cover, light intensity, and throughfall precipitation in coniferous forests. Ecology, 50(2), 255-263. https://doi.org/10.2307/1934853
  • [3] Chopra, R. N., Chopra, I. C., Handa, K. L., & Kapur, L. D. (1958). Chopra’s Indigenous Drugs of India (2nd ed.).Kolkata, Academic Publishers.
  • [4] Djordjevic, S. M. (2017). From medicinal plant raw material to herbal remedies. In H. A. El-Shemy (Ed.), Aromatic and Medicinal Plants- Back to Nature (pp. 269-288). DOI: 10.5772/63696
  • [5] Dubey, P., Raghubanshi, A. S., & Dwivedi, A. K. (2017). Functional traits of herbs in dry deciduous forest: an analysis. Journal of Global Biosciences, 6(5), 4999-5011.
  • [6] Fern, K, (2019). Tropical.thefern.info. Retrieved from http://tropical.theferns.info/viewtropical.php/ id=Desmodium+triflorum.
  • [7] Franche, C., Lindström, K., & Elmerich, C. (2009). Nitrogen-fixing bacteria associated with leguminous and non-leguminous plants. Plant and soil, 321(1-2), 35-59. DOI 10.1007/s11104-008-9833-8
  • [8] Ghosh, P., & Rahaman, C. H. (2016). Pharmacognostic studies and phytochemical screening of aerial and root parts of Cyanotistuberosa (Roxb.) Schult. &Schult. f.-an ethnomedicinal herb. World Journal of Pharmaceutical Research, 5(2), 1580-1601.
  • [9] Gilliam, F. S. (2014). The herbaceous layer in forests of Eastern North America. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
  • [10] Gilliam, F. S., & Roberts, M. R. (2003). The dynamic nature of the herbaceous layer. In F. S. Gilliam & M.R. Robert (Eds.), The herbaceous layer in forests of Eastern North America (1st ed., pp. 323-337). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. Retrieved from http://www.franksgilliam.com/uploads/1/2/0/1/120187503/gilliam___roberts__2003_--herb_book_ch_14.pdf
  • [11] Jolls, C. L., & Whigham, D. F. (2014). Populations of and threats to rare plants of the herb layer: still more challenges and opportunities for conservation biologists. In Gilliam, F. S. (Ed.), The herbaceous layer in forests of Eastern North America (2nd ed., pp.134–164). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199837656.003.0006
  • [12] Kakpure, M. R., &Rothe, S. P. (2012). Qualitative phytochemical screening of Indian witchweed: Strigaasiatica (L.) O. Ktze-an unexplored medicinal parasitic plant. Journal of Experimental Sciences, 3(3), 28-31.
  • [13] Kamboj, Ved P. (2000). Herbal medicine. Current science, 78(1), 35-39.
  • [14] Khan, M. S. A., & Ahmad, I. (2019). Herbal medicine: current trends and future prospects. In New Look to Phytomedicine Academic Press,3-13.https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-814619-4.00001-X
  • [15] Khare, C. P. (2008). Indian medicinal plants: an illustrated dictionary. New York, NY: Springer Science & Business Media.
  • [16] Khurm, M., Chaudhry, B. A., Uzair, M., & Janbaz, K. H. (2016). Antimicrobial, Cytotoxic, Phytotoxic and Antioxidant Potential of Heliotropium strigosum Willd. Medicines, 3(3),20. https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines3030020
  • [17] Makhija, I. K., &Khamar, D. (2010). Anti-snake venom properties of medicinal plants. Der Pharmacia Lettre, 2(5), 399-411.
  • [18] Maridass, M., & De Britto, A. J. (2008). Origins of plant derived medicines. Ethnobotanical Leaflets, 2008(1), 44.
  • [19] Misra, R. (1968). Ecology Work Book. Calcutta: Oxford & IBH Publishing Company.
  • [20] Mukherjee, A., & Sarma, K. (2014). Community structure of plant species in Okhla Bird Sanctuary, Delhi, India. International Journal of Conservation Science, 5(3), 397-408.
  • [21] Muller, R. N. (2003). Nutrient relations of the herbaceous layer in deciduous forest ecosystems. In F.S. Gilliam & M.R. Robert (Eds.), The herbaceous layer in forests of Eastern North America (1st ed., pp.15-37). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199837656.003.0002
  • [22] Nagaraja, B.C.,Prasanna Kumar C.N. & Vidyashree.S, (2020).Tree Diversity and their Fruiting Attributes in Periurban Bangalore University Campus. Indian forester, 146 (7), 615-622.
  • [23] Okubo, A., & Mitchell, J. G. (2001). Patchy distribution and diffusion. In A. Okubo & S. A. Levin (Eds.), Diffusion and Ecological Problems: Modern Perspectives, (2nd ed., pp. 268-297) New York, NY: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4757-4978-6_9
  • [24] Pal, S. K., & Shukla, Y. (2003). Herbal medicine: current status and the future. Asian pacific journal of cancer prevention, 4(4), 281-288.
  • [25] Pielou,E. C. (1966). The measurement of diversity in different types of biological collections. Journal of theoretical biology, 13 (1), 131-144. https://doi.org/10.1016/0022-5193(66)90013-0
  • [26] Ramaswamy, S. V., &Razi, B. A. (1973). Flora of Bangalore District. Mysore, Prasaranga: University of Mysore.
  • [27] Rao, S, K., Swamy, R, K., Kumar, D, Arun Singh R. and K. Gopalakrishna Bhat (2019). Flora of Peninsular India. Retrivedfrom http://peninsula.ces.iisc.ac.in/plants.
  • [28] Retnam KR, John De Britto A. (2007). Antimicrobial activity of a medicinal plant Hybanthus enneaspermus (Linn.) F. Muell. Natural Product Radiance, 6(5), 366–368.
  • [29] Saha, S., Deb, B., Mullick, J. B., Choudhury, P. R., Saha, P., Ghosh, B., &Sil, S. K. (2016). Antibacterial Activity of Evolvulus nummularius against Standard ATCC Gram Positive and Gram Negative Strains: Studies on MIC, MBC, Growth Curve Analysis and ROS Generation. International Journal of Pure & Applied Bioscience, 4(4), 205-211.http://dx.doi.org/10.18782/2320-7051.2357
  • [30] Shannon, C.E., &Weaver, W. (1949). The Mathematical Theory of communication. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press.
  • [31] Simpson, E. H. (1949). Measurement of diversity. Nature, 163(4148), 688.
  • [32] Singh, N. K., Seth, A., &Maurya, S. K. (2015). Croton bonplandianum Baill.: A rich source of essential fatty acids, linoleic and linolenic acid. Der Pharma Chemica, 7(3), 85-88.
  • [33] Udayashankar, A. C., Nandhini, M., Rajini, S. B., & Prakash, H. S. (2019). Pharmacological significance of medicinal herb Eclipta alba L.–a review. International Journal of Pharmaceutical Science and Research, 10(8), 3592-3606. http://dx.doi.org/10.13040/IJPSR.0975-8232.10(8).3592-06
  • [34] Uritu, C. M., Mihai, C. T., Stanciu, G. D., Dodi, G., Alexa-Stratulat, T., Luca, A.,& Tamba, B. I. (2018). Medicinal plants of the family Lamiaceae in pain therapy: A review. Pain Research and Management, 1-44. https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/7801543
  • [35] Wijaya, S., Nee, T. K., Jin, K. T., Hon, L. K., San, L. H., & Wiart, C. (2011). Antibacterial and antioxidant activities of Synedrellanodiflora (L.) Gaertn.(Asteraceae). Journal of complementary and Integrative Medicine, 8(1), 1553-3840.DOI: 10.2202/1553-3840.149
  • [36] KATAR, N., & KATAR, D. (2020). Effect of Different Row Spaces on Yield and Quality of Anise (Pimpinella anisum) under Eskisehir Ecological Conditions. Biological Diversity and Conservation, 13(3), 314-321. DOI: 10.46309/biodicon.2020.769561

Details

Primary Language English
Subjects Biodiversity Conservation
Journal Section Research Article
Authors

Vidyashree S (Primary Author)
Bangalore University
0000-0003-4780-0972
India


Uday KUMAR This is me
Bangalore University
0000-0002-4483-001X
India

Supporting Institution Bangalore University, Karnataka, India
Early Pub Date April 14, 2022
Publication Date April 15, 2022
Application Date April 29, 2021
Acceptance Date February 8, 2022
Published in Issue Year 2022, Volume 15, Issue 1

Cite

APA S, V. & Kumar, U. (2022). Herb diversity and their medicinal uses in Biodiversity Conservation area of Jnanabharathi Campus, Bangalore University, Karnataka . Biyolojik Çeşitlilik ve Koruma , 15 (1) , 73-83 . DOI: 10.46309/biodicon.2022.930000

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