Year 2020, Volume 8 , Issue 1, Pages 305 - 323 2020-03-15

Psychological Framework for Gifted Children’s Cognitive and Socio-Emotional Development: A Review of the Research Literature and Implications

Dimitrios PAPADOPOULOS [1]


A literature review was conducted to examine the shaping of giftedness during childhood, a period when crucial developmental changes that affect academic outlook and psychosocial wellness take place. The search of the literature covered articles published in English without restriction on publication year in the following databases: PsycINFO, Google Scholar, EBSCOhost, ERIC, and ProQuest. A total of 95 sources were categorized into two thematic areas that include (a) cognitive development of gifted children and (b) socio-emotional development of gifted children. The analysis of the literature reveals that although superior performance constitutes a key element in the notion of giftedness, ability alone cannot lead a gifted child to personal excellence and long-term commitment within a talent domain as it is insufficient to explain outstanding achievements across the life course. Indeed, these publications provide some evidence that the process of nurturing giftedness in children is determined by the dynamic interaction between individual strengths and a supportive environment, which can stimulate or inhibit the full use of a child’s ability. Finally, this review is intended to change the way researchers, school practitioners, and policymakers think about the limits and capabilities of gifted children, and to provide suggestions for strategies to support their development.
gifted children, gifted education, cognitive and socio-emotional development, childhood
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Primary Language en
Subjects Education, Scientific Disciplines, Education, Special, Psychology
Published Date March 2020
Journal Section Gifted Education
Authors

Orcid: 0000-0003-4835-3107
Author: Dimitrios PAPADOPOULOS (Primary Author)
Institution: University of Crete
Country: Greece


Supporting Institution Greek Association of Mental Health for Children and Adults (Office for Gifted Child Development and Education)
Project Number 267/09-18
Dates

Publication Date : March 15, 2020

Bibtex @review { jegys666308, journal = {Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists}, issn = {}, eissn = {2149-360X}, address = {editorjegys@gmail.com}, publisher = {Genç Bilge Yayıncılık}, year = {2020}, volume = {8}, pages = {305 - 323}, doi = {10.17478/jegys.666308}, title = {Psychological Framework for Gifted Children’s Cognitive and Socio-Emotional Development: A Review of the Research Literature and Implications}, key = {cite}, author = {PAPADOPOULOS, Dimitrios} }
APA PAPADOPOULOS, D . (2020). Psychological Framework for Gifted Children’s Cognitive and Socio-Emotional Development: A Review of the Research Literature and Implications. Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists , 8 (1) , 305-323 . DOI: 10.17478/jegys.666308
MLA PAPADOPOULOS, D . "Psychological Framework for Gifted Children’s Cognitive and Socio-Emotional Development: A Review of the Research Literature and Implications". Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists 8 (2020 ): 305-323 <https://dergipark.org.tr/en/pub/jegys/issue/52150/666308>
Chicago PAPADOPOULOS, D . "Psychological Framework for Gifted Children’s Cognitive and Socio-Emotional Development: A Review of the Research Literature and Implications". Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists 8 (2020 ): 305-323
RIS TY - JOUR T1 - Psychological Framework for Gifted Children’s Cognitive and Socio-Emotional Development: A Review of the Research Literature and Implications AU - Dimitrios PAPADOPOULOS Y1 - 2020 PY - 2020 N1 - doi: 10.17478/jegys.666308 DO - 10.17478/jegys.666308 T2 - Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists JF - Journal JO - JOR SP - 305 EP - 323 VL - 8 IS - 1 SN - -2149-360X M3 - doi: 10.17478/jegys.666308 UR - https://doi.org/10.17478/jegys.666308 Y2 - 2020 ER -
EndNote %0 Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists Psychological Framework for Gifted Children’s Cognitive and Socio-Emotional Development: A Review of the Research Literature and Implications %A Dimitrios PAPADOPOULOS %T Psychological Framework for Gifted Children’s Cognitive and Socio-Emotional Development: A Review of the Research Literature and Implications %D 2020 %J Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists %P -2149-360X %V 8 %N 1 %R doi: 10.17478/jegys.666308 %U 10.17478/jegys.666308
ISNAD PAPADOPOULOS, Dimitrios . "Psychological Framework for Gifted Children’s Cognitive and Socio-Emotional Development: A Review of the Research Literature and Implications". Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists 8 / 1 (March 2020): 305-323 . https://doi.org/10.17478/jegys.666308
AMA PAPADOPOULOS D . Psychological Framework for Gifted Children’s Cognitive and Socio-Emotional Development: A Review of the Research Literature and Implications. JEGYS. 2020; 8(1): 305-323.
Vancouver PAPADOPOULOS D . Psychological Framework for Gifted Children’s Cognitive and Socio-Emotional Development: A Review of the Research Literature and Implications. Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists. 2020; 8(1): 323-305.