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Main issues in counselling gifted children and youths

Year 2021, Volume 8, Issue 2, 73 - 85, 15.08.2021

Abstract

Counselling gifted children and their families is of extreme importance for the future of science, technology, the financial situation of individuals, families, communities, countries and continents, and the ability to fight against hunger, poverty, lack of good-enough water and air-pollution, as well as improve the situation of those in need. It is of no less importance for the well-being of the young generation of scientists, artists, politicians, and as we have recently very well understood – health care professionals of all levels and in charge of all tasks responsible for our future and the future of the next generations. Good, supportive counselling those who help all these aims means navigating the gifted in the path that will make them materialize their gifts. In order to make this happen it has to be kept in mind that there is no "prescription" that can be followed, neither "a set of recommendations". Each gifted child or adolescent is unique; every one of them is entitled to her or his "haute couture'' dress or suit perfectly suited for them. However, here are some of the main issues most frequently discussed by parents, teachers, counsellors and psychologists of gifted children: The social situation of the gifted child/adolescent, Is there a "right time" for teaching a young child reading and writing? Mathematics? Science?, Class-skipping and the gifted child, Pros and cons of revealing the child's giftedness to the kindergarten- or school-teacher, Dealing with the boredom of the gifted child in the school system, Is there a "most appropriate" class or school for the gifted student?, Afternoon activities for the gifted child: How many are "too many"?, Sibling-relationships in the gifted family, Parental authority and the gifted child, Planning the future education of the gifted adolescent. These are just a few of the issues I have been asked about for over three decades – mainly by parents and the team-members of the 55+ enrichment programs operating in Israel for gifted children. In this article I am to discuss – though in a nutshell – all of them.

References

  • Ackerman, C.M. (1997). Identifying gifted adolescents using personality characteristics: Dabrowski’s overexcitabilities. Roeper Review, 19(4), 229-237.
  • Bates, T.C., & Rock, A. (2004). Personality and information processing speed: Independent influences on intelligent performance. Intelligence, 32(1), 33-46 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.intell.2003.08.002
  • Bouchet, N. M. (2005). To give or to take? Assessing five levels of moral emotional development. Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities & Social Sciences. Vol 65(7-A), 2005, 2782. US: Univ Microfilms International.
  • Brennan, T., & Piechowski, M. M. (1991). A developmental framework for self-actualization: Evidence from case studies. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 31(3), 43-64.
  • Burks, B.S., Jensen, D.W., & Terman, L.M. (1930). Genetic studies of genius, vol. 3: The promise of youth. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
  • Burruss, J. D., & Kaenzig, L. (1999). Introversion: The often forgotten factor impacting the gifted. Virginia Association for the Gifted Newsletter, 21(1). Retrieved from https://www.davidsongifted.org/search-database/entry/a10274
  • Cox, C.M. (1977). Background characteristics of 456 gifted students. Gifted Child Quarterly, 21, 261-267.
  • Cross, T.L. (2017). On the Social and Emotional Lives of Gifted Children (5th ed.). Woodway, TX: Prufrock Press
  • Daniels, S., & Piechowski, M. M. (2009). Living with intensity: Understanding the Sensitivity, Excitability and Emotional Development of Gifted Children, Adolescents and Adults. Scottsdale, AZ: Great Potential Press.
  • David, H. (2002). Geometry in the Israeli kindergarten. In W. Peschek (Hrsg.). Beiträge zum Mathematikunterricht. Vorträge auf der 36. Tagung für Didaktik der Mathematik vom 25. Februar bis 1. März 2002 in Klagenfurt (S. 143-146). Hildesheim und Berlin: Verlag Franzbecker.
  • David, H. (2008). The mathematics acceleration program of the Tel Aviv University (1970-1999). In R. Leikin (Ed.), Proceedings of The 5th International Conference Creativity in Mathematics and the Education of Gifted Students (pp. 427-429). Haifa, Israel, February 24-28, 2008.
  • David, H. (2010). Gifted Case Studies: Keynote. In A. İşman & Z. Kaya (eds.), International Conference on New Horizons in Education: Proceedings book (pp. 7-23). Famagusta, Cyprus, 23rd-25th June 2010.
  • David, H. (2011). Teachers' Attitude: Its importance in nurturing and educating gifted children. Gifted and Talented International, 26(1-2), 65-80.
  • David, H. (2012a). Mathematical giftedness in early childhood. International Journal of Research in Management, Economics and Commerce, 2(12), 19-31.
  • David, H. (2012b). Ethical issues in educating and counseling the gifted. Gifted Education Press Quarterly, 26(3), 7-13.
  • David, H. (2013). Gifted children and their siblings: On research, opinions, beliefs and facts (in Hebrew). PsychoActualya, January issue, 46-51.
  • David, H. (2014a). Why is diagnosing the gifted in Israel so problematic? On the problems of diagnosing gifted children and the difficulties in de-ciphering such diagnoses. Australasian Journal of Gifted Education, 23(1), 49-58.
  • David, H. (2014b). The gifted Arab child in Israel. Saarbrücken, Germany: Lambert Academic Publishing.
  • David, H. (2015). Does the gifted student need a gifted teacher? Gifted Education Press Quarterly, 30(4), 7-17.
  • David, H. (2016). Diagnostic et enseignement pour les enfants hp: l'exemple d'Israël. Revue économique et sociale, 74(4), 103-112 [English version: Diagnosing and schooling of gifted children: The example of Israel].
  • David, H. (2018). Problems and challenges of the gifted adolescent: School-related problems of the gifted adolescent. Journal of Interdisciplinary Sciences, 2(2), 113-131.
  • David, H. (2019a). Emotionally, Socially and Learning Disabled Gifted Children: Theory and Treatment. New York: Nova Science Publishers.
  • David, H. (2019b). Why is the rate of gifted girls’ parents seeking help for their daughters is much lower than that of boys’? The gender aspect. In H. David (Ed.), Understanding Gifted Children: Perspectives, Gender Differences and Challenges. New York: Nova Science Publishers.
  • David, H. (2020a). On-line identification of mathematical giftedness: Case study of a 3-year-old girl in Israel. In On-line dynamic assessment of gifted children during corona-time (pp. 15-49). New York: Nova Science Publishers.
  • David, H. (2020b). Personal summary: A Good Jewish Girl Should Watch Her Language. In On-line dynamic assessment of gifted children during corona-time (pp. 126-142). New York: Nova Science Publishers.
  • David, H. (2020c). The conditions for establishing a therapeutic alliance between the counselor and the gifted client. Proceedings of the 1st International Congress on gifted Young Scientists Education (ICGYSE). Istanbul, Turkey: 20-22 October 2020.
  • David, H., Gil, M. & Raviv, I. (2009). Sibling relationships among Eilat families with at least one gifted child. Gifted and Talented International, 24(2), 71-88.
  • Dossey, L. (2016). Introverts: A Defense. Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing, 12(3), 151-160. DOI: 10.1016/j.explore.2016.02.007
  • Dwairy, M. (2002). Foundations of a psycho-social dynamic personality theory of collective people. Clinical Psychology Review, 22(3), 343-360.
  • Dwairy, M. (2004a). Parenting styles and mental health of Arab gifted adolescents. Gifted Child Quarterly, 48(4), 351-352.
  • Dwairy, M. (2004b). Individuation among Bedouin versus urban Arab adolescents: National, ethnic and gender differences. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 10(4), 350-360.
  • Dwairy, M, & Achoui, M. (2006). Introduction to three cross-regional research studies on parenting styles, individuation, and mental health in Arab societies. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 37(3), 221-229.
  • Dwairy, M., Achoui, M., Abouserie, R., & Farah, A. (2006a). Adolescent-family connectedness among Arabs: A second cross-regional research study. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 37(3), 248-261.
  • Dwairy, M., Achoui, M., Abouserie, R., & Farah A. (2006b). Parenting styles, individuation, and mental health of Arab adolescents: A third cross-regional research study. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 37(3), 262-272.
  • Dwairy, M., Achoui, M., Abouserie, R., Farah, A., Sakhleh, A.A., Fayad, M., & Khan, H.K. (2006). A first cross-regional research study. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 37(3), 230-247
  • Dwairy, M., & Menshar K. E. (2006). Parenting style, individuation, and mental health of adolescents in Egypt. Journal of Adolescence, 29(11), 103-117.
  • Guthrie, K.H. (2019). “Nothing is ever easy”: Parent Perceptions of Intensity in Their Gifted Adolescent Children. The Qualitative Report, 24(8), 2080-2101. Retrieved from https://nsuworks.nova.edu/tqr/vol24/ iss8/16
  • Hancock, S. (Producer) (2013, March 31). Gareth Williams: The Brilliant Brontë Sisters: A Documentary [Television Broadcast]. ITV.
  • Hébert, T. P. (2011). Understanding the Social and Emotional Lives of Gifted Students. Waco, TX: Prufrock.
  • Housand, A., & Reis, S.M. (2008). Self-Regulated Learning in Reading: Gifted Pedagogy and Instructional Settings. Journal of advanced academics, 20(1), 108-136. Doi: 10.4219/jaa-2008-865
  • Janos, P. (1987). A fifty-year follow-up of Terman's youngest college students and IQ-matched age mates. Gifted Child Quarterly, 31(2), 55-58.
  • Karnes, F.A., & Bean, S.M. (1996). Leadership and the gifted. Focus on Exceptional Children, 29(1), 1-16. DOI: 10.17161/foec.v29i1.6859
  • Matthews, M. S. (2004). Leadership education for gifted and talented youth: A review of the literature. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 28(1), 77-113. Doi: 10.1177/016235320402800105
  • Milgram, R.M. (2003). Challenging Out-of-school Activities as a Predictor of Creative Accomplishments in Art, Drama, Dance and Social Leadership. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 47(3), 305-315.
  • Milgram, R.M., & Hong, E. (1999). Creative out-of-school activities in intellectually gifted adolescents as predictors of their life accomplishment in young adults: A longitudinal study. Creativity Research Journal, 12(2), 77-87. DOI: 10.1207/s15326934crj1202_1
  • Oden, M.H. & Terman, L.M. (1968). The fulfillment of promise: 40-year follow-up of the Terman gifted group. Genetic Psychology Monographs, 77(1), 3-93.
  • Ogurlu, U., & Sevim, M.N. (2017). The opinions of gifted students about leadership training. Journal of Ethnic and Cultural Studies, 4(2), 41-52
  • Olszweski-Kubilius, P., Lee, S.Y., & Thomson, D. (2014). Family environment and social development in gifted students. Gifted Child Quarterly, 58(3), 199-216.
  • Oppong,E., Shore, B.M., & Muis, K.R. (2019). Clarifying the connections among giftedness, metacognition, self-regulation, and self-regulated learning: Implications for theory and practice. Gifted child Quarterly, 63(2), 102-119. Doi: 10.1177/0016986218814008
  • Persson, R.S. (2007). The myth of the antisocial genius: A survey study of the socio-emotional aspects of high-IQ individuals. Gifted and Talented International, 22(2), 19-33.
  • Piechowski, M. (2006). “Mellow out,” they say. If I only could. Intensities and sensitivities of the young and bright. Madison, WI: Yunasa.
  • Piirto, J., Cassone, G., Ackerman, C., & Fraas, J. (1996). An international study of intensity in talented teenagers using the Overexcitability Questionnaire. Paper presented at Dabrowski Conference, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, May 23, 1996.
  • Piirto, J. (2000). The Piirto Pyramid of talent development. Gifted Child Today, 23(6), 22-29. Doi: 10.1177/107621750002300608
  • Rimm, S.B., Siegle, D., & Davis, G.A. (2018). Education of the Gifted and Talented (7th Ed.). New York: Pearson.
  • Rinn, A.N. (2018). Social and Emotional Considerations for Gifted Students. In S. Pfeiffer, E. Shaunessy-Dedrick & M. Foley Nicpon (Eds.), APA Handbook of Giftedness and Talent (pp. 453-464). Washington, DC: APA Books.
  • Roeper, A., & Silverman, L.K. (2009). Giftedness and moral promise. In D. Ambrose, & T. Cross (Eds.), Morality, ethics, and gifted minds (pp. 251-264). New York: Springer. DOI: 10.1007/978-0-387-89368-6.
  • Seagoe, M.V. (1975). Terman and the gifted. Los Altos, CA: W. Kaufmann.
  • Sears, R.R. (1977). Sources of life satisfaction of the Terman gifted men. American Psychologist, 32(2), 119-128.
  • Sears, R.R. (1984). The Terman gifted children study. In S.A. Mednick, M. Hanway, & K.M. Finello (Eds.) Handbook of longitudinal research volume 1: Birth and childhood cohorts. New York: Praeger.
  • Silverman, L.K. (1994). The moral sensitivity of gifted children and the evolution of society. Roeper Review, 17(2), 110-116. Doi:/10.1080/02783199409553636
  • Silverman L.K. (2009). What have we learnt about our gifted children? 30th Anniversary 1979-2009. Retrieved from https://www.gifteddevelopment.com/articles/what-we-have-learned-about-gifted-children
  • Silverman, L.K. & Kearney, K. (1989). Parents of the extraordinarily gifted. Advanced Development, 1, 1-10.
  • Stoeger, H., & Zeidner, M. (2019). Self-regulated learning in gifted, talented, and high-achieving learners. High Ability Studies, 30(1-2), 1-8. DOI: 10.1080/13598139.2019.1601326
  • Terman, L.M. (1925). Mental and physical traits of a thousand gifted children. Genetic studies of genius, vols. 1 & 2. Stanford: Stanford UP.
  • Terman. L.M. (1954a). The discovery and encouragement of exceptional talent. American Psychologist, 9(6), 221-230.
  • Terman, L.M. (1954b). Scientists and non-scientists in a group of 800 gifted men. Psychological Monographs, 68(7), 1-44.
  • Terman, L.M. & Oden, M.H. (1935). The promise of youth. Genetic studies of genius, vol. 3. Stanford: Stanford UP.
  • Terman, L.M. & Oden, M.H. (1947). Genetic studies of genius. vol. 4: The Gifted ChildGrows Up: Twenty-five years' follow-up of a superior group. Stanford UP, Stanford CA.
  • Terman, L.M. & Oden, M.H. (1959). The gifted group at mid-life: 35 years' follow-up of the superior child. Stanford, CA; Stanford University Press.
  • Tortrop, H.S. (2015). A comparison of gifted and non-gifted students' self-regulation skills for science learning. Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists, 31(1), 42-57.
  • Zorman, R. & David, H. (2000). There is another way: Girls and women – Achievements and challenges (in Hebrew). Jerusalem: The Henrietta Szold Institute and The Ministry of Education.

Year 2021, Volume 8, Issue 2, 73 - 85, 15.08.2021

Abstract

References

  • Ackerman, C.M. (1997). Identifying gifted adolescents using personality characteristics: Dabrowski’s overexcitabilities. Roeper Review, 19(4), 229-237.
  • Bates, T.C., & Rock, A. (2004). Personality and information processing speed: Independent influences on intelligent performance. Intelligence, 32(1), 33-46 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.intell.2003.08.002
  • Bouchet, N. M. (2005). To give or to take? Assessing five levels of moral emotional development. Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities & Social Sciences. Vol 65(7-A), 2005, 2782. US: Univ Microfilms International.
  • Brennan, T., & Piechowski, M. M. (1991). A developmental framework for self-actualization: Evidence from case studies. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 31(3), 43-64.
  • Burks, B.S., Jensen, D.W., & Terman, L.M. (1930). Genetic studies of genius, vol. 3: The promise of youth. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
  • Burruss, J. D., & Kaenzig, L. (1999). Introversion: The often forgotten factor impacting the gifted. Virginia Association for the Gifted Newsletter, 21(1). Retrieved from https://www.davidsongifted.org/search-database/entry/a10274
  • Cox, C.M. (1977). Background characteristics of 456 gifted students. Gifted Child Quarterly, 21, 261-267.
  • Cross, T.L. (2017). On the Social and Emotional Lives of Gifted Children (5th ed.). Woodway, TX: Prufrock Press
  • Daniels, S., & Piechowski, M. M. (2009). Living with intensity: Understanding the Sensitivity, Excitability and Emotional Development of Gifted Children, Adolescents and Adults. Scottsdale, AZ: Great Potential Press.
  • David, H. (2002). Geometry in the Israeli kindergarten. In W. Peschek (Hrsg.). Beiträge zum Mathematikunterricht. Vorträge auf der 36. Tagung für Didaktik der Mathematik vom 25. Februar bis 1. März 2002 in Klagenfurt (S. 143-146). Hildesheim und Berlin: Verlag Franzbecker.
  • David, H. (2008). The mathematics acceleration program of the Tel Aviv University (1970-1999). In R. Leikin (Ed.), Proceedings of The 5th International Conference Creativity in Mathematics and the Education of Gifted Students (pp. 427-429). Haifa, Israel, February 24-28, 2008.
  • David, H. (2010). Gifted Case Studies: Keynote. In A. İşman & Z. Kaya (eds.), International Conference on New Horizons in Education: Proceedings book (pp. 7-23). Famagusta, Cyprus, 23rd-25th June 2010.
  • David, H. (2011). Teachers' Attitude: Its importance in nurturing and educating gifted children. Gifted and Talented International, 26(1-2), 65-80.
  • David, H. (2012a). Mathematical giftedness in early childhood. International Journal of Research in Management, Economics and Commerce, 2(12), 19-31.
  • David, H. (2012b). Ethical issues in educating and counseling the gifted. Gifted Education Press Quarterly, 26(3), 7-13.
  • David, H. (2013). Gifted children and their siblings: On research, opinions, beliefs and facts (in Hebrew). PsychoActualya, January issue, 46-51.
  • David, H. (2014a). Why is diagnosing the gifted in Israel so problematic? On the problems of diagnosing gifted children and the difficulties in de-ciphering such diagnoses. Australasian Journal of Gifted Education, 23(1), 49-58.
  • David, H. (2014b). The gifted Arab child in Israel. Saarbrücken, Germany: Lambert Academic Publishing.
  • David, H. (2015). Does the gifted student need a gifted teacher? Gifted Education Press Quarterly, 30(4), 7-17.
  • David, H. (2016). Diagnostic et enseignement pour les enfants hp: l'exemple d'Israël. Revue économique et sociale, 74(4), 103-112 [English version: Diagnosing and schooling of gifted children: The example of Israel].
  • David, H. (2018). Problems and challenges of the gifted adolescent: School-related problems of the gifted adolescent. Journal of Interdisciplinary Sciences, 2(2), 113-131.
  • David, H. (2019a). Emotionally, Socially and Learning Disabled Gifted Children: Theory and Treatment. New York: Nova Science Publishers.
  • David, H. (2019b). Why is the rate of gifted girls’ parents seeking help for their daughters is much lower than that of boys’? The gender aspect. In H. David (Ed.), Understanding Gifted Children: Perspectives, Gender Differences and Challenges. New York: Nova Science Publishers.
  • David, H. (2020a). On-line identification of mathematical giftedness: Case study of a 3-year-old girl in Israel. In On-line dynamic assessment of gifted children during corona-time (pp. 15-49). New York: Nova Science Publishers.
  • David, H. (2020b). Personal summary: A Good Jewish Girl Should Watch Her Language. In On-line dynamic assessment of gifted children during corona-time (pp. 126-142). New York: Nova Science Publishers.
  • David, H. (2020c). The conditions for establishing a therapeutic alliance between the counselor and the gifted client. Proceedings of the 1st International Congress on gifted Young Scientists Education (ICGYSE). Istanbul, Turkey: 20-22 October 2020.
  • David, H., Gil, M. & Raviv, I. (2009). Sibling relationships among Eilat families with at least one gifted child. Gifted and Talented International, 24(2), 71-88.
  • Dossey, L. (2016). Introverts: A Defense. Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing, 12(3), 151-160. DOI: 10.1016/j.explore.2016.02.007
  • Dwairy, M. (2002). Foundations of a psycho-social dynamic personality theory of collective people. Clinical Psychology Review, 22(3), 343-360.
  • Dwairy, M. (2004a). Parenting styles and mental health of Arab gifted adolescents. Gifted Child Quarterly, 48(4), 351-352.
  • Dwairy, M. (2004b). Individuation among Bedouin versus urban Arab adolescents: National, ethnic and gender differences. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 10(4), 350-360.
  • Dwairy, M, & Achoui, M. (2006). Introduction to three cross-regional research studies on parenting styles, individuation, and mental health in Arab societies. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 37(3), 221-229.
  • Dwairy, M., Achoui, M., Abouserie, R., & Farah, A. (2006a). Adolescent-family connectedness among Arabs: A second cross-regional research study. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 37(3), 248-261.
  • Dwairy, M., Achoui, M., Abouserie, R., & Farah A. (2006b). Parenting styles, individuation, and mental health of Arab adolescents: A third cross-regional research study. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 37(3), 262-272.
  • Dwairy, M., Achoui, M., Abouserie, R., Farah, A., Sakhleh, A.A., Fayad, M., & Khan, H.K. (2006). A first cross-regional research study. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 37(3), 230-247
  • Dwairy, M., & Menshar K. E. (2006). Parenting style, individuation, and mental health of adolescents in Egypt. Journal of Adolescence, 29(11), 103-117.
  • Guthrie, K.H. (2019). “Nothing is ever easy”: Parent Perceptions of Intensity in Their Gifted Adolescent Children. The Qualitative Report, 24(8), 2080-2101. Retrieved from https://nsuworks.nova.edu/tqr/vol24/ iss8/16
  • Hancock, S. (Producer) (2013, March 31). Gareth Williams: The Brilliant Brontë Sisters: A Documentary [Television Broadcast]. ITV.
  • Hébert, T. P. (2011). Understanding the Social and Emotional Lives of Gifted Students. Waco, TX: Prufrock.
  • Housand, A., & Reis, S.M. (2008). Self-Regulated Learning in Reading: Gifted Pedagogy and Instructional Settings. Journal of advanced academics, 20(1), 108-136. Doi: 10.4219/jaa-2008-865
  • Janos, P. (1987). A fifty-year follow-up of Terman's youngest college students and IQ-matched age mates. Gifted Child Quarterly, 31(2), 55-58.
  • Karnes, F.A., & Bean, S.M. (1996). Leadership and the gifted. Focus on Exceptional Children, 29(1), 1-16. DOI: 10.17161/foec.v29i1.6859
  • Matthews, M. S. (2004). Leadership education for gifted and talented youth: A review of the literature. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 28(1), 77-113. Doi: 10.1177/016235320402800105
  • Milgram, R.M. (2003). Challenging Out-of-school Activities as a Predictor of Creative Accomplishments in Art, Drama, Dance and Social Leadership. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 47(3), 305-315.
  • Milgram, R.M., & Hong, E. (1999). Creative out-of-school activities in intellectually gifted adolescents as predictors of their life accomplishment in young adults: A longitudinal study. Creativity Research Journal, 12(2), 77-87. DOI: 10.1207/s15326934crj1202_1
  • Oden, M.H. & Terman, L.M. (1968). The fulfillment of promise: 40-year follow-up of the Terman gifted group. Genetic Psychology Monographs, 77(1), 3-93.
  • Ogurlu, U., & Sevim, M.N. (2017). The opinions of gifted students about leadership training. Journal of Ethnic and Cultural Studies, 4(2), 41-52
  • Olszweski-Kubilius, P., Lee, S.Y., & Thomson, D. (2014). Family environment and social development in gifted students. Gifted Child Quarterly, 58(3), 199-216.
  • Oppong,E., Shore, B.M., & Muis, K.R. (2019). Clarifying the connections among giftedness, metacognition, self-regulation, and self-regulated learning: Implications for theory and practice. Gifted child Quarterly, 63(2), 102-119. Doi: 10.1177/0016986218814008
  • Persson, R.S. (2007). The myth of the antisocial genius: A survey study of the socio-emotional aspects of high-IQ individuals. Gifted and Talented International, 22(2), 19-33.
  • Piechowski, M. (2006). “Mellow out,” they say. If I only could. Intensities and sensitivities of the young and bright. Madison, WI: Yunasa.
  • Piirto, J., Cassone, G., Ackerman, C., & Fraas, J. (1996). An international study of intensity in talented teenagers using the Overexcitability Questionnaire. Paper presented at Dabrowski Conference, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, May 23, 1996.
  • Piirto, J. (2000). The Piirto Pyramid of talent development. Gifted Child Today, 23(6), 22-29. Doi: 10.1177/107621750002300608
  • Rimm, S.B., Siegle, D., & Davis, G.A. (2018). Education of the Gifted and Talented (7th Ed.). New York: Pearson.
  • Rinn, A.N. (2018). Social and Emotional Considerations for Gifted Students. In S. Pfeiffer, E. Shaunessy-Dedrick & M. Foley Nicpon (Eds.), APA Handbook of Giftedness and Talent (pp. 453-464). Washington, DC: APA Books.
  • Roeper, A., & Silverman, L.K. (2009). Giftedness and moral promise. In D. Ambrose, & T. Cross (Eds.), Morality, ethics, and gifted minds (pp. 251-264). New York: Springer. DOI: 10.1007/978-0-387-89368-6.
  • Seagoe, M.V. (1975). Terman and the gifted. Los Altos, CA: W. Kaufmann.
  • Sears, R.R. (1977). Sources of life satisfaction of the Terman gifted men. American Psychologist, 32(2), 119-128.
  • Sears, R.R. (1984). The Terman gifted children study. In S.A. Mednick, M. Hanway, & K.M. Finello (Eds.) Handbook of longitudinal research volume 1: Birth and childhood cohorts. New York: Praeger.
  • Silverman, L.K. (1994). The moral sensitivity of gifted children and the evolution of society. Roeper Review, 17(2), 110-116. Doi:/10.1080/02783199409553636
  • Silverman L.K. (2009). What have we learnt about our gifted children? 30th Anniversary 1979-2009. Retrieved from https://www.gifteddevelopment.com/articles/what-we-have-learned-about-gifted-children
  • Silverman, L.K. & Kearney, K. (1989). Parents of the extraordinarily gifted. Advanced Development, 1, 1-10.
  • Stoeger, H., & Zeidner, M. (2019). Self-regulated learning in gifted, talented, and high-achieving learners. High Ability Studies, 30(1-2), 1-8. DOI: 10.1080/13598139.2019.1601326
  • Terman, L.M. (1925). Mental and physical traits of a thousand gifted children. Genetic studies of genius, vols. 1 & 2. Stanford: Stanford UP.
  • Terman. L.M. (1954a). The discovery and encouragement of exceptional talent. American Psychologist, 9(6), 221-230.
  • Terman, L.M. (1954b). Scientists and non-scientists in a group of 800 gifted men. Psychological Monographs, 68(7), 1-44.
  • Terman, L.M. & Oden, M.H. (1935). The promise of youth. Genetic studies of genius, vol. 3. Stanford: Stanford UP.
  • Terman, L.M. & Oden, M.H. (1947). Genetic studies of genius. vol. 4: The Gifted ChildGrows Up: Twenty-five years' follow-up of a superior group. Stanford UP, Stanford CA.
  • Terman, L.M. & Oden, M.H. (1959). The gifted group at mid-life: 35 years' follow-up of the superior child. Stanford, CA; Stanford University Press.
  • Tortrop, H.S. (2015). A comparison of gifted and non-gifted students' self-regulation skills for science learning. Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists, 31(1), 42-57.
  • Zorman, R. & David, H. (2000). There is another way: Girls and women – Achievements and challenges (in Hebrew). Jerusalem: The Henrietta Szold Institute and The Ministry of Education.

Details

Primary Language English
Subjects Education, Special
Journal Section Counselling and Guidance of Gifted
Authors

Hanna DAVİD (Primary Author)
Tel Aviv University
0000-0002-7917-3152
Israel

Publication Date August 15, 2021
Published in Issue Year 2021, Volume 8, Issue 2

Cite

APA David, H. (2021). Main issues in counselling gifted children and youths . Journal of Gifted Education and Creativity , 8 (2) , 73-85 . Retrieved from https://dergipark.org.tr/en/pub/jgedc/issue/64210/851943

Journal of Gifted Education and Creativity indexed in DOAJ since March 15, 2020. 2nd International Congress on Gifted Youth and Sustainability of the Education (ICGYSE) 18-19 December 2021 (Please click for attendance)

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