Year 2019, Volume 17, Issue 1, Pages 1 - 15 2019-04-30

Genel afete hazırlık inançları ve ilişkili sosyodemografik özellikler: Yalova Üniversitesi örneği
General disaster preparedness beliefs and related sociodemographic characteristics: The example of Yalova University, Turkey

Ebru Inal [1] , Kerim Hakan Altıntaş [2] , Nuri Doğan [3]

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Amaç: Bu çalışma, kavramsal bir çerçeve olarak Sağlık İnanç Modeli’nin kullanılmasıyla Genel Afetlere Hazırlık İnançları ile ilgili sosyodemografik ve afetlerle ilişkili faktörleri belirlemeyi amaçlamaktadır. Yöntem: Bu araştırma Nisan-Temmuz 2014 yılları arasında Yalova’da yürütülmüştür. Geçerliği kabul edilmiş Sağlık İnanç Modeli’ne dayalı Genel Afetlere Hazırlık İnanç Ölçeği akademik ve idari personelden oluşan 286 kişilik bir çalışma grubuna uygulanmıştır. Genel Afetlere Hazırlık Ölçeği puanı Sağlık İnanç Modeli altölçeklerinin toplanmasıyla elde edilmiştir. Genel Afetlere Hazırlık Ölçeği puanı ve ilişkili faktörler arasındaki ilişki için hiyerarşik linear regresyon kullanılmıştır.  Bulgular: Genel Afetlere Hazırlık İnanç puanı daha yüksek aylık gelir, daha yüksek mesleki durum, daha önceki afet deneyimi ve acil durum/afet eğitimi almış olmak ile pozitif olarak ilişkilidir. Daha önce acil durum/afet eğitimi alan katılımcılar daha önce hiç acil durum/afet eğitimi almadığını belirten katılımcılar ilekarşılaştırıldığında ortalama olarak 19.05 kez daha yüksek Genel Afetlere Hazırlık İnanç puanına sahiptir  (​β​ =19.05±4.83, p<0.001). Ayrıca, daha önce herhangi bir afet deneyimi olan katılımcılar hiç afet deneyimi olmayan katılımcılar ile karşılaştırıldığında ortalama olarak 21.62 kez daha yüksek Genel Afetlere Hazırlık İnanç puanına sahiptir (​β​ =21.62±0.32, p<0.001). Sonuç:​ Aylık gelir, mesleki durum, herhangi bir afet deneyimi ve herhangi bir afet eğitimine sahip olma durumu Genel Afetlere Hazırlık İnancı ile ilişkili önemli faktörlerdir. Genel afete hazırlığı artırmayı amaçlayan müdahaleler afet eğitiminin temel ilkesini içermeli ve ilk öncelik olarak daha düşük sosyoekonomik durumda olan kişileri hedeflemelidir. 

Aim: This study aimed to identify sociodemographic and disaster related factors associated with General Disaster Preparedness Belief using the Health Belief Model as a theoretical framework.  Methods: The survey study was conducted in Yalova, Turkey between April and July, 2014. A prevalidated General Disaster Preparedness Belief scale instrument based on the Health Belief Model was administered to a study group of 286 academic and administrative staff. The General Disaster Preparedness Belief score was computed by summing up the six Health Belief Model subscales. Hierarchical linear regression was used to test for association between the General Disaster Preparedness Belief score and its associated factors. Results: The General Disaster Preparedness Belief score was positively associated with; higher monthly income, higher occupational status, having experienced any disaster previously and having any emergency/disaster education. Respondents who had any emergency/disaster education had on average an 19.05 higher General Disaster Preparedness Belief score as compared to respondents who had no emergency/disaster education (β=19.05±4.83, p<0.001). Furthermore, participants who had experienced any disaster had on average 21.615 higher GDPB score as compared to participants who had never experienced any disaster (​β​ =21.62±0.32, p<0.001). Conclusions: Monthly income, occupational status, previous experiences of disasters and access to emergency/disaster education were important factors associated with General Disaster Preparedness Belief. Interventions aimed at increasing general disaster preparedness should include provision of disaster education and should target individuals with lower socioeconomic status as a priority.  

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Primary Language en
Subjects Health Care Sciences and Services
Journal Section Original Research
Authors

Author: Ebru Inal (Primary Author)
Institution: Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart Üniversitesi, Sağlık Yüksekokulu, Acil Yardım ve Afet Yönetimi Bölümü, Çanakkale, Türkiye
Country: Turkey


Author: Kerim Hakan Altıntaş
Country: Turkey


Author: Nuri Doğan

Dates

Publication Date: April 30, 2019

Bibtex @research article { tjph381667, journal = {Turkish Journal of Public Health}, issn = {}, eissn = {1304-1088}, address = {Turkish Society of Public Health Specialists}, year = {2019}, volume = {17}, pages = {1 - 15}, doi = {10.20518/tjph.381667}, title = {General disaster preparedness beliefs and related sociodemographic characteristics: The example of Yalova University, Turkey}, key = {cite}, author = {Inal, Ebru and Altıntaş, Kerim Hakan and Doğan, Nuri} }
APA Inal, E , Altıntaş, K , Doğan, N . (2019). General disaster preparedness beliefs and related sociodemographic characteristics: The example of Yalova University, Turkey. Turkish Journal of Public Health, 17 (1), 1-15. DOI: 10.20518/tjph.381667
MLA Inal, E , Altıntaş, K , Doğan, N . "General disaster preparedness beliefs and related sociodemographic characteristics: The example of Yalova University, Turkey". Turkish Journal of Public Health 17 (2019): 1-15 <http://dergipark.org.tr/tjph/issue/44103/381667>
Chicago Inal, E , Altıntaş, K , Doğan, N . "General disaster preparedness beliefs and related sociodemographic characteristics: The example of Yalova University, Turkey". Turkish Journal of Public Health 17 (2019): 1-15
RIS TY - JOUR T1 - General disaster preparedness beliefs and related sociodemographic characteristics: The example of Yalova University, Turkey AU - Ebru Inal , Kerim Hakan Altıntaş , Nuri Doğan Y1 - 2019 PY - 2019 N1 - doi: 10.20518/tjph.381667 DO - 10.20518/tjph.381667 T2 - Turkish Journal of Public Health JF - Journal JO - JOR SP - 1 EP - 15 VL - 17 IS - 1 SN - -1304-1088 M3 - doi: 10.20518/tjph.381667 UR - https://doi.org/10.20518/tjph.381667 Y2 - 2018 ER -
EndNote %0 Turkish Journal of Public Health General disaster preparedness beliefs and related sociodemographic characteristics: The example of Yalova University, Turkey %A Ebru Inal , Kerim Hakan Altıntaş , Nuri Doğan %T General disaster preparedness beliefs and related sociodemographic characteristics: The example of Yalova University, Turkey %D 2019 %J Turkish Journal of Public Health %P -1304-1088 %V 17 %N 1 %R doi: 10.20518/tjph.381667 %U 10.20518/tjph.381667
ISNAD Inal, Ebru , Altıntaş, Kerim Hakan , Doğan, Nuri . "General disaster preparedness beliefs and related sociodemographic characteristics: The example of Yalova University, Turkey". Turkish Journal of Public Health 17 / 1 (April 2019): 1-15. https://doi.org/10.20518/tjph.381667
AMA Inal E , Altıntaş K , Doğan N . General disaster preparedness beliefs and related sociodemographic characteristics: The example of Yalova University, Turkey. TurkJPH. 2019; 17(1): 1-15.
Vancouver Inal E , Altıntaş K , Doğan N . General disaster preparedness beliefs and related sociodemographic characteristics: The example of Yalova University, Turkey. Turkish Journal of Public Health. 2019; 17(1): 15-1.