Yıl 2020, Cilt 7 , Sayı 1, Sayfalar 1 - 9 2020-03-20

How Important are Social Relations for Happiness? Empirical Evidence from Turkey
How Important are Social Relations for Happiness? Empirical Evidence from Turkey

Yasin ACAR [1]


In this study, we examine how effective are social relations in determining the happiness of an individual by utilizing the life satisfaction survey micro data set (2017)provided by the Turkey Statistical Institute. According to the results of the logistic regression method, women seem to be happier than men, and married people are more satisfied than unmarried. Employees in the public sector appear to be less happy than those in the private sector. Also, health seems to have a positive effect on individual happiness. We find that people who are satisfied with their job, and those who are satisfied with their earnings are also happier. Satisfaction with social life (such as entertainment, cultural, and sporting activities) increases the happiness of individuals, and having more free time makes people happier. Satisfaction with relatives and satisfaction with relationships with people related to work-life were also included in the analysis as factors affecting the happiness of an individual positively. The survey also gives information on about the degree of individuals’ satisfaction with their relationships with neighbors and friends, but these factors do not seem to affect the happiness of individuals.

In this study, we examine how effective are social relations in determining the happiness of an individual by utilizing the life satisfaction survey micro data set (2017)provided by the Turkey Statistical Institute. According to the results of the logistic regression method, women seem to be happier than men, and married people are more satisfied than unmarried. Employees in the public sector appear to be less happy than those in the private sector. Also, health seems to have a positive effect on individual happiness. We find that people who are satisfied with their job, and those who are satisfied with their earnings are also happier. Satisfaction with social life (such as entertainment, cultural, and sporting activities) increases the happiness of individuals, and having more free time makes people happier. Satisfaction with relatives and satisfaction with relationships with people related to work-life were also included in the analysis as factors affecting the happiness of an individual positively. The survey also gives information on about the degree of individuals’ satisfaction with their relationships with neighbors and friends, but these factors do not seem to affect the happiness of individuals.

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Konular İktisat
Bölüm Research Articles
Yazarlar

Orcid: 0000-0002-0847-1902
Yazar: Yasin ACAR (Sorumlu Yazar)
Kurum: BILECIK SEYH EDEBALI UNIVERSITY
Ülke: Turkey


Tarihler

Yayımlanma Tarihi : 20 Mart 2020

APA Acar, Y . (2020). How Important are Social Relations for Happiness? Empirical Evidence from Turkey . Equinox Journal of Economics Business and Political Studies , 7 (1) , 1-9 . Retrieved from https://dergipark.org.tr/tr/pub/equinox/issue/52969/687005