Ethical Principles and Publication Policy

Plagiarism is the unethical act of copying someone else’s prior ideas, processes, results or words without explicit acknowledgement of the original author and source. Self-plagiarism occurs when an author utilizes large part of his/her own previously published work without using appropriate references. This can range from getting the same manuscript published in multiple journals to modifying a previously published manuscript with some new data.


Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientist (JEGYS) (ISSN: 2149-360X) is an international refereed scientific journal which publishes review and research article, teaching techniques and activities for the education of the gifted young scientist, book reviews and interviews in English. Submitted articles are evaluated in a double blinded peer-reviewed fashion. The JEGYS is an open access journal, published 4 issues a year. JEGYS holds copyrights for all articles published in the journal.


The journal is strictly against any unethical act of copying or plagiarism in any form. Plagiarism is said to have occurred when large portions of a manuscript have been copied from existing previously published resources. All manuscripts submitted for publication to JEGYS are cross-checked for plagiarism using Turnitin/ iThenticate software.


JEGYS meticulously requests and checks plagiarism reports from authors for their article submissions.Papers found to be plagiarized during initial stages of review are out-rightly rejected and not considered for publication in the journal. In case a manuscript is found to be plagiarized after publication, the Editor-in-Chief will conduct preliminary investigation, may be with the help of a suitable committee constituted for the purpose. If the manuscript is found to be plagiarized beyond the acceptable limits, the journal will contact the author’s Affilation and Funding Agency, if any. A determination of misconduct will lead JEGYS to run a statement bidirectionally linked online to and from the original paper, to note the plagiarism and provide a reference to the plagiarized material. The paper containing the plagiarism will also be marked on each pages. this situation is conveyed to the relevant unit in a report.

Types of Plagiarism

The following types of plagiarism are considered by JEGYS:

Full Plagiarism: Previously published content without any changes to the text, idea and grammar is considered as full plagiarism. It involves presenting exact text from a source as one’s own.

Partial Plagiarism: If content is a mixture from multiple different sources, where the author has extensively rephrased text, then it is known as partial plagiarism.

Self-Plagiarism: When an author reuses complete or portions of their pre-published research, then it is known as self-plagiarism. Complete self-plagiarism is a case when an author republishes their own previously published work in a new journal.


Plagiarism Action Plan and Precautions of JEGYS

JEGYS respects intellectual property and aims at protecting and promoting original work of its authors. Manuscripts containing plagiarized material are against the standards of quality, research and innovation. Hence, all authors submitting articles to JEGYS are expected to abide ethical standards and abstain from plagiarism, in any form. In case, an author is found to be suspected of plagiarism in a submitted or published manuscript then, JEGYS shall contact the author (s) to submit his / her (their) explanation within two weeks, which may be forwarded to the Plagiarism Finding Unit (PFU) constituted for the purpose, for further course of action.

If JEGYS does not receive any response from the author within the stipulated time period, then the director of authors’ affiliations to which the author is affiliated shall be contacted to take strict action against the concerned author.

JEGYS shall take serious action against published manuscripts found to contain plagiarism and shall completely remove them from JEGYS journal website (https://dergipark.org.tr/en/pub/jegys) and other third party websites where the paper is listed and indexed. The moment, any article published in JEGYS database is reported to be plagiarized, JEGYS will constitute a Plagiarism Finding Unit (PFU) to investigate the same. Upon having established that the manuscript is plagiarized from some previously published work, JEGYS shall support the original author and manuscript irrespective of the publisher and may take any or all of the following immediate actions or follow the additional course of actions as recommended by the committee:

JEGYS editorial office shall immediately contact the Head of the Affiliations to which the author(s) is (are) affiliated to take strict action against the concerned author.

JEGYS shall remove the PDF copy of the published manuscript from the website (https://dergipark.org.tr/en/pub/jegys) and disable all links to full text article. The term Plagiarized Manuscript shall be appended to the published manuscript title.

JEGYS shall disable the author account with the journal and reject all future submissions from the author for a period of 3 years or even ban the authors permanently.

JEGYS may also display the list of such authors along with their full contact details on the JEGYS website. (https://dergipark.org.tr/en/pub/jegys)

The JEGYS editorial board holds meetings, takes opinions, and implements them on combating plagiarism. JEGYS draws on the knowledge and experience of other academic journals to combat plagiarism.


Open Access Policy

JEGYS abide by Budapest Open Access Initiative and provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge. JEGYS abide by Budapest Open Access Initiative and provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge. Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists (JEGYS) is an Open Access Journal. All articles can be downloaded free of charge. Articles published in the Journal are Open-Access articles distributed under a Creative Commons Attibution – NonCommercial – NoDerrivatives 4.0.


Benefits of open access for authors, include:

OA articles are freely and permanently available online immediately upon publication, enabling broader distribution and increased visibility
Authors can easily comply with the OA mandates of their institution or funding body as OA articles are usually published under a Creative Commons license
The final version can be re-used and immediately deposited in any repository
In most cases authors retain the copyright to their work
Articles are citation tracked and included in all major bibliographic databases
There are no space constraints, i.e. unlimited space for supplementary material including figures, extensive data and video footage
The journal allows readers to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of its articles and allow readers to use them for any other lawful purpose.

Budapest Open Access Initiative
An old tradition and a new technology have converged to make possible an unprecedented public good. The old tradition is the willingness of scientists and scholars to publish the fruits of their research in scholarly journals without payment, for the sake of inquiry and knowledge. The new technology is the internet. The public good they make possible is the world-wide electronic distribution of the peer-reviewed journal literature and completely free and unrestricted access to it by all scientists, scholars, teachers, students, and other curious minds. Removing access barriers to this literature will accelerate research, enrich education, share the learning of the rich with the poor and the poor with the rich, make this literature as useful as it can be, and lay the foundation for uniting humanity in a common intellectual conversation and quest for knowledge.

For various reasons, this kind of free and unrestricted online availability, which we will call open access, has so far been limited to small portions of the journal literature. But even in these limited collections, many different initiatives have shown that open access is economically feasible, that it gives readers extraordinary power to find and make use of relevant literature, and that it gives authors and their works vast and measurable new visibility, readership, and impact. To secure these benefits for all, we call on all interested institutions and individuals to help open up access to the rest of this literature and remove the barriers, especially the price barriers, that stand in the way. The more who join the effort to advance this cause, the sooner we will all enjoy the benefits of open access.
The literature that should be freely accessible online is that which scholars give to the world without expectation of payment. Primarily, this category encompasses their peer-reviewed journal articles, but it also includes any unreviewed preprints that they might wish to put online for comment or to alert colleagues to important research findings. There are many degrees and kinds of wider and easier access to this literature. By "open access" to this literature, we mean its free availability on the public internet, permitting any users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of these articles, crawl them for indexing, pass them as data to software, or use them for any other lawful purpose, without financial, legal, or technical barriers other than those inseparable from gaining access to the internet itself. The only constraint on reproduction and distribution, and the only role for copyright in this domain, should be to give authors control over the integrity of their work and the right to be properly acknowledged and cited.

While the peer-reviewed journal literature should be accessible online without cost to readers, it is not costless to produce. However, experiments show that the overall costs of providing open access to this literature are far lower than the costs of traditional forms of dissemination. With such an opportunity to save money and expand the scope of dissemination at the same time, there is today a strong incentive for professional associations, universities, libraries, foundations, and others to embrace open access as a means of advancing their missions. Achieving open access will require new cost recovery models and financing mechanisms, but the significantly lower overall cost of dissemination is a reason to be confident that the goal is attainable and not merely preferable or utopian.
To achieve open access to scholarly journal literature, we recommend two complementary strategies.

Self-Archiving: First, scholars need the tools and assistance to deposit their refereed journal articles in open electronic archives, a practice commonly called, self-archiving. When these archives conform to standards created by the Open Archives Initiative, then search engines and other tools can treat the separate archives as one. Users then need not know which archives exist or where they are located in order to find and make use of their contents.

Open-access Journals: Second, scholars need the means to launch a new generation of journals committed to open access, and to help existing journals that elect to make the transition to open access. Because journal articles should be disseminated as widely as possible, these new journals will no longer invoke copyright to restrict access to and use of the material they publish. Instead they will use copyright and other tools to ensure permanent open access to all the articles they publish. Because price is a barrier to access, these new journals will not charge subscription or access fees, and will turn to other methods for covering their expenses. There are many alternative sources of funds for this purpose, including the foundations and governments that fund research, the universities and laboratories that employ researchers, endowments set up by discipline or institution, friends of the cause of open access, profits from the sale of add-ons to the basic texts, funds freed up by the demise or cancellation of journals charging traditional subscription or access fees, or even contributions from the researchers themselves. There is no need to favor one of these solutions over the others for all disciplines or nations, and no need to stop looking for other, creative alternatives.

Open access to peer-reviewed journal literature is the goal. Self-archiving (I.) and a new generation of open-access journals (II.) are the ways to attain this goal. They are not only direct and effective means to this end, they are within the reach of scholars themselves, immediately, and need not wait on changes brought about by markets or legislation. While we endorse the two strategies just outlined, we also encourage experimentation with further ways to make the transition from the present methods of dissemination to open access. Flexibility, experimentation, and adaptation to local circumstances are the best ways to assure that progress in diverse settings will be rapid, secure, and long-lived.

The Open Society Institute, the foundation network founded by philanthropist George Soros, is committed to providing initial help and funding to realize this goal. It will use its resources and influence to extend and promote institutional self-archiving, to launch new open-access journals, and to help an open-access journal system become economically self-sustaining. While the Open Society Institute's commitment and resources are substantial, this initiative is very much in need of other organizations to lend their effort and resources.
We invite governments, universities, libraries, journal editors, publishers, foundations, learned societies, professional associations, and individual scholars who share our vision to join us in the task of removing the barriers to open access and building a future in which research and education in every part of the world are that much more free to flourish.

February 14, 2002 Budapest, Hungary